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Andrew Wakefield speaks out

(181 Posts)
babanouche Thu 18-Apr-13 00:02:03

www.youtube.com/watch?v=d7kbWfsygG4

Sorry if this has been done to death. I've never been to this part of MN before. This is a really interesting clip, worth watching to the very end. My LO is due MMR soon and I have my doubts now.

Previous to watching this I was sure he was a bad scientist. He says the measles outbreak in wales may be due to the vaccine not working. He also throws doubt on the people who approved the triple vaccine & challenges certain professionals to a televised public debate. Very thought provoking stuff.

Spidermama Fri 19-Apr-13 19:05:29

A few more parents here here Coroong.
I'm not sure what the relevance is of diabetes costs.

Beachcomber Fri 19-Apr-13 19:10:52

Beachcomber, it's upsetting to hear your daughter had an adverse reaction to a vaccination, I hope she is on the road to a full recovery and healthy life.

She isn't (we are just out of hospital again) but thanks all the same. As you say, we all have our various health issues within our families and of course there are loads of other ways to have problems than through vaccines. I don't doubt that the majority of children cope well with vaccines, but not all of them do. Which is why my position is that we should never give an unnecessary vaccination and should never be complacent. My daughter was given Hep B vaccines by a rather jab happy doctor and knowing what we do now we are very angry about that - she didn't need them and they may have contributed to her adverse reaction to DTP.

Yes vaccines do a pretty good job of reducuing levels of infectious disease and that is a good thing. However I don't think enough is done to identify children who are at risk of not coping with vaccines, especially multiples. Balance is what is needed - and I think the obsessions with 'herd immunity' and disease eradication sway that balance into a place where we no longer proceed with caution and treat vaccines as the potent drugs they are. We are also reluctant to recognise vaccine damage/adverse events as they 'taint' the image of vaccines and lead to loss of confidence in 'the programme'. And that, is inadmissible.

featherbag Fri 19-Apr-13 19:12:01

That dangerous twat man wants locking up.

bumbleymummy Fri 19-Apr-13 19:26:04

You can't beat having a scapegoat hmm

Beachcomber Fri 19-Apr-13 19:38:29

Some figures for Sanofi Pasteur who have around 25% of the world's vaccine market;

Sanofi pasteur - 2009 net sales: € 3,483 millions (+9.2% over 2008)
Staff: more than 12,500 employees
More than 1.6 billion doses of vaccines produced yearly to immunize more than 500 million people in the world
Largest product range available, against 20 infectious diseases
A global presence
More than €1 million invested every day in R&D

So no, not as big a business as diabetes treatments but like I say, hardly short change.

Beachcomber Fri 19-Apr-13 19:44:08

On passive immunity - it seems to be a complex issue with breastfeeding playing a role but the major factor being whether mothers have had measles themselves or have been vaccinated against the disease.

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10876898

Abstract

The serological survey of 138 infants aged 8 months and 138 mothers having had protective titers of specific antibodies to measles during pregnancy was made. The study revealed that passively transferred antibodies to measles circulated in infants for a longer time and were detected more frequently under the conditions of breast feeding by mothers having had measles (up to 93.7% of infants). In artificially fed infants, born of mothers having had no measles, but previously vaccinated against this infection, antibodies to measles were detected in rather rare cases (only in 7.3%). In infants, artificially fed, but born of mothers having had measles, the level of antibodies to measles was practically unchanged (81.6%).

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