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Can I ask for some opinions please?

(22 Posts)
XBenedict Fri 01-Mar-13 09:26:00

I am a practice nurse and doing a module on immunisations. I have to work through a big pre course learning pack and part of this asks me to bring the concerns parent might have regarding immunising their DCs.

So I thought the best place to get these concerns might be on here? What sort of thing goes through your mind when you take you DC to be immunised? Are there any questions you'd really like to know the answer to but didn't ask?

What information would you like from your practice nurse? Thanks for your help, I'm really new to this role as I have always worked in secondary care and the military so practice nursing is a whole new world for me smile

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

123mon Fri 01-Mar-13 14:46:26

whats the ingrediants in the vaccine and whats the all side effects

lljkk Fri 01-Mar-13 14:52:46

Which types of side effects are reasonably normal and which ones to seek medical advice about.

bruffin Fri 01-Mar-13 16:02:13

Where to get proper information and which websites to avoid.

XBenedict Fri 01-Mar-13 16:41:10

Thank you for all these comments, they are really useful and I shall take them all to my study day on Tues for discussion smile

XBenedict Fri 01-Mar-13 21:32:43

Anymore?

redspottydress Sat 02-Mar-13 21:51:45

Give the inserts to the parents before vaccinating! Don't make the parent feel ridiculous for verbalising concerns even if you think they are being. Know your stuff, or where to find it out.

lljkk Sun 03-Mar-13 10:30:28

Probably controversial, but I think that parents should be told that side effects are so normal as to be desirable. They are a good sign, they mean that the vaccine worked, because it is supposed to provoke a strong immune response (just not too strong).

XBenedict Sun 03-Mar-13 16:10:59

Thank you

Tabitha8 Sun 03-Mar-13 16:38:08

So, if there are no side-effects, does that mean that the vaccine hasn't worked?

CatherinaJTV Sun 03-Mar-13 16:39:04

no it doesn't, it just means there have not been adverse effects.

Tabitha8 Sun 03-Mar-13 16:47:38

So, they can provoke a strong immune response without any side effects? If I had a vaccinated child, I think that I would prefer zero side effects, I must admit.

XBenedict Sun 03-Mar-13 17:50:44

It's like any medication though isn't it? We are all different - some antibiotics can produce unwanted side effects but it doesn't mean they won't work. Some medicines are prescribed for the side effects they produce and not necessarily for their primary intention.

I really appreciate all your views. I have listed them in my notes and will use them on Tues. smile

I don't vaccinate my son. If I were to, I would want easy access to the insert. I think these should be made freely available.

CelticPromise Sun 03-Mar-13 18:02:15

It might be useful for there to be an info sheet freely available with why vaccinations are offered, why at the time they are, how the Wakefield nonsense has been discredited, REAL reasons not to vaccinate and where to look for sound info.

lljkk Sun 03-Mar-13 18:02:19

That's a good explanation, XB.

Faxthatpam Sun 03-Mar-13 18:06:08

Agree with what Celtic said. Clear advance info on all those issues.

Tabitha8 Mon 04-Mar-13 17:15:04

Are we reading side-effects and adverse effects to mean the same thing?

Orphadeus Mon 04-Mar-13 23:05:39

I recall being very angry when we were due to be vaccinated at the school. I mentioned it to a friend and it was obvious he was also fuming.

We bunked that.

sashh Sat 09-Mar-13 06:30:07

Are we reading side-effects and adverse effects to mean the same thing?

No, or at least we shouldn't be.

If you go for minor surgery without a GA but with a spinal anesthetic you may be given something to relax you.

There are many drugs that can do this, and there is the option of not giving the drug at all.

One drug that is used for this a lot is midazolam. It has a well known side effect of causing short term memory loss.

So if the doctor doesn't want you to remember the operation / procedure they will use midazolam. Things like hip operations, and colonscopies are things the Dr doesn't want you to remember.

However for something like a cesarian you will want to remember so either no drug or one that doesn't case the side effect of memory loss.

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