Mumsnet has not checked the qualifications of anyone posting here. If you have any medical concerns we suggest you consult your GP.

Delayed vaccinations- how best to proceed from now?

(96 Posts)
lou4791 Fri 02-Nov-12 12:49:40

My DD had her 2 month vaccinations at 4 months of age, and her 3 month vaccinations 8 weeks later at the age of 6 months. Due in part to me wishing to space them out a bit, and to surgery cancellations she still has not had the third lot of vaccinations. An appointment has come through for them and I am not sure how to proceed.
She is now over 10 months old so is overdue her third lot of newborn vaccinations, and due her menC and Hib, and her MMR and pneumococcal very soon. Surely having all of these so close together is now unnecessary, especially as the Pneumococcal, Hib and MenC will effectively be doubled up now.
Will my most sensible option be to decline the third lot of newborn vaccinations and continue with the 12 month vaccinations as usual?

I hope someone with a deeper understanding of vaccines will be able to offer some advise.

OneMoreChap Wed 14-Nov-12 23:33:27

Brycie
I said "Your choice risks other children"

You said:
I'm a vaccinator and I'm irritated by this lazy scare-mongering.

As a health worker, I am surprised by your view. What does your professional body think of that? Unless you mean you are a parent who has had their child appropriately vaccinated...

Do you aver that that declining vaccinations as the OP intended does not compromise immunity?

Tabitha8 Thu 15-Nov-12 18:45:19

Onemore
What is the OP's apparently shiftless behaviour?

Incidentally, I frequently attend mother and toddler groups with my young child and I play with the other children there. I must ask their mothers if they ever have their own immunity to vaccine preventable diseases checked. I suspect that I'll find that I hang out with a whole bunch of irresponsible sods.

Brycie Thu 15-Nov-12 21:38:27

I mean I vaccinate my own children, sorry for the misunderstanding.

Yes, I think it's lazy, you haven't thought about the fact that there's an increased risk for her own children.

No, it doesn't really, in terms of other people, as most other people are vaccinated.

Brycie Thu 15-Nov-12 21:40:09

Oh I thougthg surgery cancellations meant she'd had surgery. Still, her baby her choice. Unless you're planning to go round to her house and pick up the pieces if things go wrong.

wearymum200 Thu 15-Nov-12 21:56:23

Advice on what to do if vaccines delayed here:
http://www.patient.co.uk/health/Childhood-Immunisation.htm
Note Hib/ MenC are included in the 3rd lot of newborn vaccinations, as is pneumococcal
MMR obv is not, but is only delayed till after 12 months, because children don't have a good antibody response to it before that.

OneMoreChap Thu 15-Nov-12 23:08:08

Brycie I despair, I really do.

Why have we had a recent spike in measles? Because stupid people didn't vaccinate their children.

Yes, stupid people.
www.travelclinic.ltd.uk/blog/post/2012/05/10/Measles-Outbreak!-UK-and-overseas.aspx

OneMoreChap Thu 15-Nov-12 23:10:48

Tabitha8
What is the OP's apparently shiftless behaviour?

"Due in part to me wishing to space them out a bit"
"Surely having all of these so close together is now unnecessary, especially as the Pneumococcal, Hib and MenC will effectively be doubled up now.
Will my most sensible option be to decline the third lot of newborn vaccinations"

asking a forum rather than a health professional.

Incidentally, I frequently attend mother and toddler groups with my young child and I play with the other children there. I must ask their mothers if they ever have their own immunity to vaccine preventable diseases checked. I suspect that I'll find that I hang out with a whole bunch of irresponsible sods.

Does that mean you approve of people who are too stupid to vaccinate their kids, then?

itsnotmymainmainpresent Thu 15-Nov-12 23:19:27

Where I live, we have to wait for our doctor to send out an appointment for us to take our children for their vaccinations.

DD2 is 14 months old and hasn't had her letter through yet for her MMR/12 month vaccinations.
Tricky for me to storm in there and demand she be vaccinated at the exact right age, when everyone else living in this Healthcare Trust area has to wait.
Not deliberately delaying vaccinating my child, but I will bet I am not the only one in the country in a similar situation.

OP: Just call your GP surgery and talk to the nurse. They will get your DD booked in, and she can have her vaccinations.

itsnotmymainmainpresent Thu 15-Nov-12 23:21:20

Oh, and apart from if I were travelling overseas to a high risk area, or in the case of tetanus should I step on a rusty nail (or similar) hmm What vaccinations should I be having myself? I'm not asthmatic. I'm 33 years old - if that makes a difference? hmm

Never heard of adult vaccinations.

ElaineBenes Fri 16-Nov-12 01:53:00

You've never heard of adult vaccinations???

Flu vaccine? Pertussis booster? You've never heard of these vaccines? Wow!

ElaineBenes Fri 16-Nov-12 01:55:32

And, yes, I most certainly would be following up to see why there is a delay in my child being protected against measles.

claraschu Fri 16-Nov-12 03:48:30

In the US you don't have to vaccinate if God has told you not to.

Brycie Fri 16-Nov-12 07:09:22

wow you're so amazingly clever onemorechap, and so selfless and rational. I really love you, you're amazing.

OneMoreChap Fri 16-Nov-12 16:05:00

brycie clever, selfless and rational? Thanks.

Although turning up so the vaccinations my kids are meant to have could be administered wasn't that hard, nor mentally taxing.

itsnotmymainmainpresent Fri 16-Nov-12 18:57:00

I've heard of flu vaccine, yes. Not the pertussis booster. Will look it up.

Flu vaccine is recommended for very young, elderly and those with respiratory problems, as far as I know. I don't fit into any of those categories. I have no problem with the fact I have never had a flu vaccine. I do realise flu can be fatal.

So pertussis booster is whooping cough. Never seen it offered to adults.
According to the NHS website it's offered during pregnancy. There are a lot of vaccinations / tests during pregnancy - they do not fall into the normal sphere of vaccinations as far as I am concerned. You don't get a letter saying "hey, you'r 30, come for your jabs" hmm

itsnotmymainmainpresent Fri 16-Nov-12 18:57:14

"you're"

ElaineBenes Fri 16-Nov-12 19:08:44

You might not be offered it on the NHS but that doesn't mean you can't get it (although I live in the US so no NHS anyhow, you make your own decisions and pay for them).

I don't want to get the flu, I have no time to take 2 weeks off work regardless of the health complications, I get the vaccine and pay for it and do the same for my kids. Just because I don't get a letter doesn't mean that I won't do it!

Tabitha8 Fri 16-Nov-12 19:25:27

I haven't yet made up my mind whether vaccines for adults, given primarily to protect children (eg. whooping cough, MMR) ought to be available for free on the NHS or if adults should have to pay for them. I'm leaning towards a freebie. If they are considered necessary, then ought they not to be free?
Presumably each one now would be the cost of a precription charge? About £8 each.

Onemore
Not sure what you meant when you said:

Does that mean you approve of people who are too stupid to vaccinate their kids, then?

I was talking about the parents having their own immunity checked, not the immunity of their children.

Anyway, I've yet to meet anyone who has avoided vaccinating a child out of stupidity.

Tabitha8 Fri 16-Nov-12 19:32:20

itsnotmy
Perhaps the reason you didn't know about adult vaccinations (I think that we are really talking about boosters of the childhood vaccines, aren't we?) is because, when children are vaccinated, we tend to believe that immunity will be lifelong.
I had no idea, even only three years ago, that I could catch measles, for example. I had the jab as a child and grew up believing that would be that forever.

ElaineBenes Fri 16-Nov-12 19:43:32

Tabitha8

I've seen lots of people on here who don't vaccinate their children out of stupidity. Unfortunately, they also think that they are very clever.

Welovecouscous Fri 16-Nov-12 19:45:35

Elaine, can't you just respect other people's choices?

ElaineBenes Fri 16-Nov-12 19:47:28

I can respect other people's choices.

I can also say that they are based on stupidity and not on scientific evidence if that is the case.

Can you not respect my opinion?

Welovecouscous Fri 16-Nov-12 19:52:12

Elaine I respect your right to the view that it is always sensible to vaccinate. I wouldn't describe you as stupid.

I don't feel the need to denigrate other people for their healthcare choices, unlike you.

I am sure many would have said there was no need to remove mercury from vaccines until the government said mercury use should be avoided. Sceptics are not always wrong.

I vaccinate btw.

Tabitha8 Fri 16-Nov-12 19:52:19

I must have missed some vaccination threads (I try to read them all) as I can't think of anyone who hasn't vaccinated their child out of stupidity.

ElaineBenes Fri 16-Nov-12 19:59:35

No, it might not always be the right choice or sensible to vaccinate. I don't know people's medical histories.

But if someone is basing their decisions on woo, then I do think that's stupidity.

Tabitha, there was a recent thread where someone insisted how knowledgable they are about vaccines. One piece of 'evidence' to show that vaccines increase allergies was an internet survey asking if a child was vaccinated and if they had allergies. I mean, seriously? That's stupidity IMO.

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now