New to the world of horses, what are the different options for owning/loaning/shari ng?

(6 Posts)
MumA70 Tue 09-Jul-13 13:12:10

I have always adored horses and finally started having lessons. I absolutely love it, I want to go everyday but don't have the time or money! :-(
I just wondered what are the different 'ownership' options and how do they work?
In an ideal world, when I'm more experienced loaning sounds like it could be an option but how does it work? Thanks

Smartieaddict Tue 09-Jul-13 14:26:15

Loaning means you take the horse and treat it as yours, usually for a fixed period, although they can be permanent. The person taking the horse on loan usually pays all the costs involved in looking after the horse, and does all the practical day to day work involved, but does not become the owner, so at some point the horse would usually go back to its owner.

Sharing varies a lot more, and would usually be worked out to suit the people involved. eg, someone might have a horse they want exercised once a week, and want a small financial contribution for that, or they may want to do the horse half the week, and someone else do the other days, and split costs 50 50.

I would look for a share first, to get an idea of what is involved if you are new to horses, then go from there. There are lots of people in the current financial climate that need some help with their horses, so you should be able to find something. Good luck!

MumA70 Tue 09-Jul-13 20:31:28

Thank you! That's really helpful to know. I really don't have a clue about any of it but would love to be more involved with horses one way or another.

JulyKit Tue 09-Jul-13 21:15:22

Hello, MumA70.
Have you joined the British Horse Society? You could then take their exams, which are a really good, solid way to learn about horse management responsibilities. (Not cheap, but owning/loaning horses, and any other sustained involvement with them never is.)
Also, have you checked out volunteering at a Blue Cross centre or similar? Or a riding school (I think e.g. Overdale in Oxon advertises for volunteers).
These are good ways to get a feel for horsey life generally.

MumA70 Wed 10-Jul-13 10:50:41

Thank you, I'll definitely look into that! Sounds great :-)

SlowlorisIncognito Thu 11-Jul-13 20:12:50

You do need some stable management experience before taking on a share or a loan- the riding is often the least difficult part of this! Your riding stables may well offer the chance to help out and learn some stable management skills.

If you don't have time to do a horse everyday, a loan is probably not for you at the moment. You would need to see to the horse probably twice a day, every day, unless you were paying a lot of money for part/full livery (where grooms do some of the looking after of the horse for you).

A share might be better for you when you have some experience, as you agree to what days you can do, and you can gain experience of looking after a horse alone.

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