Would you buy a cheap thoroughbred?

(31 Posts)
D0G Tue 12-Mar-13 18:45:28

Have seen one for £500, have spoken to the owner and he does sometimes rear on a ride if he has to stand around but flatwork and sj is excellent, I'm confident I can handle the rearing, dh's horse was the same but is now much better. He's only 8 so a good age, I'm so tempted but keep thinking for that £ there must be something seriously wrong, though the market is terrible here ATM and its definitely a buyers market.

Should I steer clear or have a look? My riding instructer can come with me to see him...

Elansofar Sat 16-Mar-13 17:04:04

No. Don't do it. You can get them for free round my way... No one wants them.

Booboostoo Wed 13-Mar-13 21:15:02

Sounds like you are not in a hurry which is a great position to be in. On the selling side anyone who can wait will be waiting for spring anyway so it's best to give it another month or two for the weather to improve.

D0G Wed 13-Mar-13 20:01:14

Well she has someone seeing him tomorrow night now so may well be sold before Saturday. I was going to go tonight but its a bit of a drive and would be dark when I arrived, I'm not going to rush into it and be saddled (see whay I did there) with an unsuitable horse. If its meant to be he will be there on Saturday. Though am thinking he will probably be a bit small for me any way, I'm 5"7 and 11 ish stone.

I have a wb on loan at the mo and she's bloody gorgeous but my friend will at some point want her back sad. I want something I can do a bit of jumping on, possibly xc and regular hacking. I'm not going to rush though, I will have loan horse for a good while yet I think I'm going to save a decent amount and really shop around. There are some lovely horses advertised for about 2k around here ATM.

Booboostoo Wed 13-Mar-13 16:18:28

I think the 'cheap' is a red herring. There are loads of cheap TBs and quite a few cheap other breeds at the moment as people are desperate to get rid of horses they can no longer afford.

'Cheap' is also misleading in the case of a horse that rears. If you do take on a horse with such an issue the first thing you would have to do is get the vet out to exclude a physical cause to his problem. You may uncover nothing, in which case you still have a potentially very dangerous behavioural issue, or you may find a physical cause some of which are very debilitating and require lengthy and costly treatments.

The question for me would not be 'shall I buy this horse?' but 'why this horse and not some other one?'. How many horses have you viewed? What do you want to do with your horse? Why does this seem particularly well suited to your purpose in comparison with others out there?

Well - there's no such thing as a cheap thoroughbred (speaking from bitter experience). They can cost more to feed, can have crap feet and can be heavy on the vet. Having said that I love them to bits and would def go and see. A plus side is that they generally box, shoe, clip and behave well in the stable having seen so much.

On a more cautious note my ex pointer reared with me out hunting - he wanted to go one way with the hounds and I wanted to go home - right up, we almost hit the tip over point and it absolutely terrified me. I've ridden for more than 40 years, since I was very small and had experience on all sorts of horses, including ones that have reared, but that was the closest I've come to go over and it scared me. I have been somewhat wary of him since and it's not an experience I would like to repeat - I now turn him in small circles if I think he's losing patience which stops him, but it's not much fun. If you are happy to deal with it then that's fine - but it is dangerous.....

EMUZ Tue 12-Mar-13 23:59:41

Definitely have a look. I bought one grin
Mine had raced from age 4 to 16 shock I searched his history and it was amazing, he'd been ridden by Richard dunwoody at one point. He was my horse of a lifetime, despite having been bar fired. 110% in traffic, you could do anything with him without holding him (clipping, shoeing, injecting) and I happily plonked a child on him. Jumped like a stag (ex chaser)
He was PTS age 22 with cushings and I miss him everyday

Price wouldn't be a worry so much, but definitely get his legs (and back) checked. Ideally get the legs scanned for possible tendon or ligament damage. Looking at his race record, he didn't earn a lot, so probably why he was retired.

He seems to have been evented from 2009 to 20011 (only up to BE90 looking at the British Eventing site )but I can't find any competition record past that date. There are a few retireds on the eventing history and it would be interesting to know if there have been many since, and why.

That said, ex-racers really can make really nice riding horses, so, pending the discovery of any major injuries and depending on 'rear' factor I'd say go for it. grin

Butkin Tue 12-Mar-13 23:09:03

DOG - it's all on the Racing Post site. I just went through it (and Racehorses of 2008) and tried to pick out the main bits for you. You can watch each of his races for 25p a go on there as well.

He packed in racing in May of his 4yo career which is a bit unusual and suggests he had some sort of setback.

D0G Tue 12-Mar-13 22:50:54

I see what you mean about the rearing dopey though it genuinely doesn't really bother me, I think I can handle it and if not know a fab person for reschooling and sorting issues out.

I don't think there are any race yards anywhere near us to phone around.

D0G Tue 12-Mar-13 22:48:20

How did you find all that out butkin? I'm
Amazed I couldn't find anything! I don't think the rearing is major, I think owner is just being totally honest iyswim?

New approach, Jim Bolger trained new approach gringrin

Thanks butkun, was on my iPhone and struggling with the RP site and jugging DD.
Sorry I got confused with StS, having lived in IRE when he was huge I should know' wink

Butkin Tue 12-Mar-13 21:58:40

There are lots of cheap - or free - ex racehorses around either direct from trainers or rehomed from retraining centres.

As Makingitup says he was originally owned and trained by Jim Bolger who bred him from a stallion, Lil's Boy, that he had owned and trained himself.

He wasn't much good so they sold him to Brendan Duke who used to train here but now lives back in Ireland.

He ran poorly in a couple of hurdles so they put him back on the flat in 2008 as a 4yo. He did managed to be placed four times in a row on the all-weather in the early Spring of 2008 - from 7 furlongs to a mile.

He was 2nd once - only beaten a neck at Wolverhampton - but never actually won. His last run was at Salisbury for a girl apprentice in May 2008.

During his racing career he wore cheek pieces, blinkers and a tongue strap so they did everything to try and get his head in front!

He is 9 now and Racing Post doesn't have any record of him going through the sales ring. He is a half-brother to three winners.

I'd be a bit worried about the rearing.

Jim Bolger is indeed a genius of a trainer but Sea The Stars was actually trained by John Oxx.

dopeysheep Tue 12-Mar-13 21:51:05

Maybe. Racing is bloody hard on them though so that would be my worry, tendon issues and the like.
But he might be great, it's a gamble. Rearing spooks me a bit, they can buck all they want but rearing can so easily turn nasty.

dikkertjedap Tue 12-Mar-13 19:36:42

Definitely get him checked by a vet and I would insure him at least for the first year in case their are hidden problems which could turn out costly.

Many ex-racers go extremely cheaply, sometimes just for free (matter of phoning round the yards, most owners rather have them going to a nice home than the butchers).

I personally would look for one who doesn't rear, but that is because some do go over, which clearly is very dangerous. Plus at the moment there are so many who will be off loaded, that you will easily get another TB (really just pick up the phone and ask racing yards if they have any horses the owners are planning to dispose of).

Having said that he's been out of training a while.
Defo try him grin

You need to try him smile
They do really love routine aswell

D0G Tue 12-Mar-13 19:25:40

She said its when he's not keen on doing something or frustrated so could be slightly more than a hop or could be a little squee type thing. Can't be worse than dh's fecking "safe plod" cob who goes vertical, now that was a bit hairy.

I love the hopping, they do it onto the gallop

horseylady Tue 12-Mar-13 19:09:34

Mine will 'hop' when excited! That's why I asked. No malice just a bit 'weeeee' I don't call them rears.

I find its mostly feed and where they have come from that's a nightmare.
But bollys always come across as well mannered and broken in

D0G Tue 12-Mar-13 19:05:38

Thanks that's really quite reassuring, it is a crap market at the moment. I do love thoroughbreds, quite excited about going to see him.

And some of the ex racers I've sold at ascot sales have been brilliant rides, and sound just useless at racing or heart not in it and have only made 300, lowest bid.
Gone to nice private homes, and 2 went to play polo.
So I would go for it personally if he is sound, if he's not and you want a TB- look at redwings and great wood.
They are fab

D0G Tue 12-Mar-13 19:02:27

I did have an ex racer, she was fecking fast and a bit nappy but also cheap and not awful. Apparently they aren't full on she said he's never tipped over and she's never come off, she thinks not malicious at all but excitable.

D0G Tue 12-Mar-13 19:00:49

Thanks that's really helpful smile. I'd not yet seen him I am planning on going on Saturday. His current owner has done a fair bit of jumping on him but now is working full time and basically doesn't have the time for him. He's been advertised for a while for more money bits she's just dropped quite a bit. My ri is very knowledgable and should be able to advise on splints etc.

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