NQT handing in notice on September return

(33 Posts)
Idratherbeeatingcake Sun 31-Aug-14 13:40:36

First time poster, so here goes.

I'm starting school tomorrow having just done my PGCE and one months transition before six week hols. The thing is, I got my job fairly early in the course and by the end of the course, I knew teaching wasn't really for me but I was already tied into a contract.
I'm just wondering if I should tell the hod of my intention to quit during tomorrow's inset or should I just hand my notice in before Oct? I don't want school trying to talk me out of it (they are super supportive) but don't want it to be out of the blue.

I enjoy working with kids but despise how the work never ends and feels all consuming. I'm nearly 40 with teenage kids and moved from a minimum wage job hoping to do something that would allow our family to finally stop struggling financially. However, this job just stresses me constantly and aggravates my anxiety. I've been looking at other jobs and am optimistic that I've gained some great experience but want to be able to move on asap. I'm aware that contractually I should work til Xmas but I'm absolutely dreading these next few months.

Sorry for the mini essay, I just wanted to give as much info as possible.

MonstersBalls Sun 31-Aug-14 13:49:50

I would wait a month before telling them so that it looks like you've given teaching (and their school) a good chance.

Out of interest why didn't you tell them at the end of last term, to give them a chance to find someone for September?

Snargaluff Sun 31-Aug-14 13:52:09

Oh god you cannot tell them during inset! I would wait until oct but to be honest I would do the NQT year so that it is done. You don't know how you will feel at the end of the year or in the future. I have many friends who said at the end of their PGCE that they would never teach, who are now embarking on their NQT a few years down the line.

Idratherbeeatingcake Sun 31-Aug-14 14:04:15

MonsterBalls, I wasn't due to start the job til Sept but was asked towards the end of my course if I could do the last four weeks of term due to early transition. I was absolutely broke and agreed even though I was exhausted. I've mentioned seberal times to my mentor and hod that I don't feel up to the job, but they just tell me it'll get easier. While that sounds good in theory, knowing that my to-do list will never end is not what I want. It just makes me feel depressed thinking about it.

Thankyou for the quick replies, by the way :-)

Idratherbeeatingcake Sun 31-Aug-14 14:10:27

Also, I didn't think I could actually do that. I thought I'd still have to hand my notice in for the official deadlines?

Why do you think it's not a good idea to let them know straight away? I was hoping that if they knew I was looking to leave, they may let me leave earlier than Xmas if I find something else. Or is it just a professional no-no?

It won't look great on your CV, no.

Floralnomad Sun 31-Aug-14 14:47:40

Surely it is not a case of them letting you leave early because you find something else - its a case of them finding someone who can start earlier . I agree you should have told them at the end of last term ,this is unfair on the school . What age children are you teaching ?

But what jobs do you think are around that pay a decent salary and aren't all consuming in the first few years? Everyone I know who is successful in their 40s slogged their guts out for at least 5 years to get established.

Not doing the NQT year would look like on a CV just doesn't like hard work. Hand in your notice when you have another job lined up. Have you actually applied for anything else ? I'm sure you have learned some new skills that would open up other areas, but I do think finishing your training (which means the NQT year) would look better than has done a PGCE.

If you are determined to go by Christmas without a job lined up, then I don't think it matters when you had your notice in, as tomorrow or October still looks flakey and will get a poor or no reference.

DoctorLawn Sun 31-Aug-14 15:25:39

Do your NQT year, because it will widen your opportunities in years to come, and will look better on your CV than not completing it.

It will be hard work, for sure - but you can do it flowers

Beetlemilk Sun 31-Aug-14 15:30:32

The end of the year is the most stressful and tiring period for teachers. Other teachers may have just been too worn out to really support you in the way they would do at the start of the year.

You might find that you enjoy making a fresh start with the children in Sept. You can always hand in your notice in Oct.

originalusernamefail Sun 31-Aug-14 15:33:26

Give it a bit longer! 4 weeks is not long enough time to make a career changing decision. I work as a nurse and when I made the move into ICU I cried all the way to work and all the way home for the first six months. I was exhausted and hated every minute and everyone there.

By the end of my 1st year I had found my stride and now feel totally comfortable and have made some great friends. Without your NQT year your PGCE will have been a waste of time. Any career worth having you need to pay your dues.

Branleuse Sun 31-Aug-14 15:35:15

do your NQT year and then maybe do supply?

amyhamster Sun 31-Aug-14 15:41:23

I would stick it out whilst looking for something else if you're 100% sure it's not for you
Maybe a HLTA?

Although often on mn people reply go for it, you only live once so if you know for definite a career in teaching / schools isn't for you go for it

EhricLovesTheBhrothers Sun 31-Aug-14 15:46:50

You've done a PGCE, you have a Job lined up and you're thinking of quoting before you started? Please reconsider. Complete the first year and see how you feel. You need to push yourself, no career is easy from the word go.

Reepits Sun 31-Aug-14 15:47:01

A not who hated teaching nearly destroyed my sons education, if you doing like it, get out....and let someone else who wants to teach get started.

Pipbin Sun 31-Aug-14 15:52:25

My suggestion, as others is to do your NQT year then try supply.
You have to be there until October anyway, no matter what you do. You might find it easier after that.
I would suggest finishing your NQT year so you are fully qualified and then teaching supply.
Supply is much easier. No planning, no reports, no parents to deal with, no OFSTED. The work isn't as regular, and the lack of wages for August can be a bind but if you are careful it can work for you.

Iggi999 Sun 31-Aug-14 15:52:47

You are wise to think of your mental health in this way. My first thought was that you are quitting way too soon - and there is no doubt that it does get easier, but then sometimes it gets harder too. Things like discipline will get loads easier once you've been there a while.

Idratherbeeatingcake Sun 31-Aug-14 19:43:45

Thankyou for all these replies. In all honesty, the staff have already been amazing in the support they've offered and the pupils, although occasionally challenging, are generally nice. I just don't want to add to other peoples' workloads because I can't manage, although people have already offered, I feel this is also 'flaky'. It is a secondary school, and one of the reasons I considered telling them straight away is so they can begin to consider filling the post as fast as possible with someone ready for the role. I did try telling my hod in july that I didnt think it was for me and asked about the likelihood of going part-time. She didn't think the nqt year could be done pt, and on reflection, I'd only be going part time to do all my non teaching work on my days off in order to have some quality family time, which now seems ridiculous. As well as this, I didn't think I'd officially be able to hand my notice in last term anyway and would have to wait til this cycle came round. It's only having time to think over the hols ( which I haven't enjoyed one day of due to the marking/planning/worrying) which has consolidated my thoughts.
The only problem with ensuring I have another job before leaving is not knowing when I could potentially leave. I have considered just trying to do supply until I find something permanent. At this point in my life, I think I'm realising I'm beyond trying to 'be' anything career-wise (unplanned children far too young and never having any real guidance/aims), and would be happy to work enough just to be able to afford not to struggle every single week and not fall into depression trying.
I did feel that I'd wasted my pgce year but I've realised it's given me lots of experience and transferable skills. I've seen several jobs I could now apply for, which I couldn't have before.
Sorry this post is scatty, just trying to address all points people have mentioned :-/

trinity0097 Sun 31-Aug-14 19:49:08

NQTs can do induction part time, it just takes longer, so if you are on a 50% Contract it takes 2 years, if on a 20% it takes 5 years and so on. You can still progress through the pay scales as an NQT it is not dependent on passing induction.

I would suggest you give it a go properly before giving up. Finishing your NQT year makes things easier for anything else you may go on to do.

unpackyoursuitcase Mon 01-Sep-14 11:25:02

You are in such a lucky position. I am doing supply after a return to teaching after a short break to raise my dd. I cannot get a teaching job!! Please do your induction year. It will be so much harder later on. You have all summer to think over things and maybe that wasn't the best. Stick at it. Put all that extra income to good use(reward yourself).
Then see how you feel next year. Good luck. Pm if you want to chat further

Idratherbeeatingcake Mon 01-Sep-14 16:58:12

Thankyou, everyone.

CatherineofMumbles Tue 02-Sep-14 09:31:01

One here who doesn't agree that you should do the whole year, but I do agree that it would be better to wait until October to hand in your notice, as you are committed to December either way. If you hand your notice in now, people's attitudes will change towards you, as they always do when someone has handed on their notice. You can make it until October! And then, when you do hand in your notice, you will only have 6 weeks to go, and you will easily be able to live through that.

ShowMeTheWonder Tue 02-Sep-14 11:08:46

I felt just like you at the end of my PGCE. I told my tutor I didn't think I was cut out for teaching. He said I might not be but I wouldn't know until I'd tried it for two or three years. I'm six years in now, though I did go part time when I had children. It's a very stressful and consuming job at times but also rewarding with great holidays! I think you would be better giving it more of a go. Planning and marking get much, much quicker and you develop systems to manage the workload. If you have a good supportive school, you may find it better than you expect.

Idratherbeeatingcake Tue 02-Sep-14 17:50:10

Thankyou again. There's been some great adive and opinions, all of which I appreciate.

I've not said anything to school yet. The inset was ok but I felt so disheartened last night and this morning that I just cried all the way there. However, I managed the day ok and am going to try and manage until october, at least.

One day at a time I suppose.

Beetlemilk Tue 02-Sep-14 18:04:50

Oh well done for getting through today. smile

Yes one day at a time. You can do it!

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