Difference between SCITT and Schools Direct?

(5 Posts)
iheartshoes Wed 06-Aug-14 07:40:48

Or am I being very stupid and they are both the same thing? Have seen schools direct can be either salaried or unsalaried but not sure what the difference between this and a SCITT is? I am trying to work out the different teacher training options available to me for next year. Love to hear anyone's experience of doing either of these and how compatible you found both with family life - I am currently SAHM to 16 month old DD who would be 2.5 when I started and very worried about the impact it might have on her... Be really interested to hear from anyone who has done similar

lifeissweet Wed 06-Aug-14 07:52:48

I did a Primary SCITT. It was somewhere between a school-based and a university option. I spent about half time on placement and half in lectures at college. It wasn't salaried, but funded like a normal PGCE. It gave me both a PGCE and QTS like the normal university courses - I think more school-based options give you the QTS without the PGCE, but I may be wrong.

It suited me really well. I liked that I was in school so much and was able to try out the theory from the lectures within the same week. It was also a good way to get a job, as I was in school so much that I became a part of the furniture!

At the time (about 7 years ago) DS was just 2. It was tough, I won't lie! And I needed a lot of support from his father and other family. The workload is HUGE. Don't underestimate it.

I don't think it effected DS too badly, but I did feel very guilty about constantly passing him around and not spending much quality time with him (I still do, actually - teaching is like that)

Coolas Sun 10-Aug-14 21:34:40

SCITT is unpaid and is an initial teacher training course based in schools (2 normally) with university tuition as we'll.
SSD (school salary direct) are unqualified teachers who are employed by the school and therefore paid to train on the job, but they have pretty much sole responsibility for their classes (about 50% timetable). They have a mentor who is assigned as a supervisor.
Whichever way round you do it, teacher training is hugely time consuming. Good Luck.

Supermum222 Wed 13-Aug-14 07:34:15

Hi,

I am hoping to do teacher training next year and I am leaning towards the SCITT. I have worked in the NHS for a number of years so I like the idea of time spent in school backed up with lectures from people who know what they are talking about.

Supermum222 Wed 13-Aug-14 07:35:06

My children will be 11 and 7 when I hopefully make the move.

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