Retraining as primary teacher without moving house, and with a family - possible?

(12 Posts)
gaelicsheep Wed 08-May-13 20:25:27

wishwehadgoneabroad - OK, I've messaged you smile

QueenOfWhatever - I guess for me the school I was based in would need to be a whole lot nearer than Bristol to make it doable. I will call them though - good to know everyone's so helpful - and there's an open evening soon that I'll try to get to as well.

Wishwehadgoneabroad Wed 08-May-13 19:38:38

Don't do it!!!

I made a career change 5 years ago...long hard slog (financially and emotionally) through the PGCE.

I am now in the process of career changing back to the career I left in the first place.

If you want to know why, inbox me.

Glos Uni, just give them a call. Everyone I've come across during this has been really helpful and supportive. They actually understand that having children is important unlike most employers! The schools are all over the place and SD is very new, which is part of the reason why it's so hard to find a list of schools where you might be placed.

For the whole course, it's 12 days in Cheltenham and 15 in Swindon. When I thought about it like that, the commuting seemed more manageable.

The Teaching Agency website is a total dog's dinner. I would always try to speak to someone either by phone or face-to-face.

gaelicsheep Wed 08-May-13 17:07:36

It would also be brilliant to hear from anyone who has done a PGCE in this scenario with crazy commuting. I gather the days are quite long even before you add a journey either side? Did you see your own kids at all and what about planning and coursework?

gaelicsheep Wed 08-May-13 17:00:34

Thanks QueenOfWhatever. Who did you apply to for that? Gloucestershire uni or the primary school itself? Is it an official partner school? It seems quite hard to get an idea of where partner schools actually are. Bristol/Swindon/Cheltenham are right at the limits of possibility I'd say.

Yes, you definitely can do this. I am in Bristol and start on the Schools Direct programme this September. Three days a week in a primary in Bristol, one day a week at the teaching school in Swindon and one day a week at the University of Gloucestershire in Cheltenham.

A reasonable amount of commuting but it's only for nine months. If those sound realistic to you, then go for it. They may still have places available for this September but you'd have to be super quick. I only applied this March.

gaelicsheep Wed 08-May-13 00:06:26

Wow that's really interesting - good luck!. There seem to be several flexible pathways on offer there. Have you discussed that with them yet? One pathway seems to suggest much of the work, including school placements, could be two days a week. I totted it up and thought - perhaps optimistically - I might get away with annual leave, extended leave and a little unpaid leave. I'm under no illusions it would be very hard work alongside a job and a family!

PinkCanary Wed 08-May-13 00:01:56

I'm waiting on a decision from Edge Hill at the moment re the PGCE part time flexible pathway. It is my first choice, and application was submitted at the early December deadline. They only contacted applicants in Feb, for March & April interviews, and am still waiting to hear. (Hoping no news is good news!)
I currently work as a TA but once a place is confirmed I'll need to write to governing body to request time off for placements. However my head teacher has suggested that its unlikely I'll be permitted. So I might need to quit my job anyhow. Stuck between a rock and a hard place...

gaelicsheep Wed 08-May-13 00:01:56

Also I guess I'm thinking towards other jobs in education as possible long term options well. Having QTS seems to be an essential prerequisite for pretty much everything. I'd hope to go on to do a Masters I guess, then who knows.

gaelicsheep Tue 07-May-13 23:58:52

Hi, I know what you mean, but coming from a sector where the lack of jobs is truly spectacular, that doesn't worry me too much. Especially if the much vaunted increase in school rolls is to be believed. I believe the GTP is now for primary as well, which I guess is some kind of indicator. But boy is it complicated with the different training options, and finance arrangements, in the different countries.

Primrose123 Tue 07-May-13 23:48:57

I looked at this a few years ago and I am in Wales. I looked at the in school training scheme, but found out that it was only done for secondary training. That might have changed now though.

The thing that put me off most was the lack of jobs. I know lots of unemployed teachers, and they are good teachers. My father used to be a school governor, and they had to let some teachers go and merge classes for financial reasons. Then, when they did advertise for a new teacher, they had about 120 applicants.

gaelicsheep Tue 07-May-13 23:34:01

And has anyone done this? I am in Wales where it is even harder to find decent information than it is on the English Teaching Agency site. I am close to the border though so not impossible to consider training in England. My problem right now is deciding on a route.
I am the main breadwinner so taking a year out to do a PGCE is a massive and risky leap financially, plus I think I would struggle to commute to and fro every day to a suitable university. Welsh universities, with one exception, would be impossible as they are all miles away.
The Graduate Teacher Programme in Wales is a possibility, but there are only 10 places per area so it strikes me this could be very difficult.
School Direct in an English school is vaguely possible, but only if I could find a school in commutable distance so not a huge amount of choice.
Or part time, on a course that would allow me to continue in my current job. I've only found one course (Edge Hill) where I think that could be remotely possible as I have family close by. All the others seem to suggest that even though university teaching might be part time, school placements would definitely be full time making it a non-starter for holding down a job while training.

Has anyone any pearls of wisdom to shed on this? This is before I even start worrying about the suitability of teaching as a career if you have a young family and want to see them, ever, in term time!

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