Cats wanting fed all the time

(6 Posts)
cozietoesie Tue 01-Oct-13 09:08:31

Ah - if he's only snacking 'occasionally' he's likely attention seeking rather than hungry. (Which was always likely to be the way of things.) I think more play is needed, I'm afraid.

(Also, perhaps, some grooming. Have you tried that? I've noticed with Seniorboy that 5 minutes groom seems to satisfy him for a good couple of hours. Being such concentrated attention, I guess.)

bootsycollins Tue 01-Oct-13 09:08:28

Our cat bully's dh constantly meowing for food but dh has made a Rod for his own back by being a big softie and giving in to his meowing. I'm the disciplinarian in this house, if he's being particularly vocal with the meowing and I'm trying to get some peace I'll fob him off with a few Dreamies grin otherwise I just say "no, don't be a silly boy, you've just been fed" he usually gives up and slinks off for a kip.

Ghirly Tue 01-Oct-13 09:02:25

Thanks for replying cozietoesie
I'll have a look at the links for some tips.
My middle cats mum was a rag doll. I guessed his docile and cuddly nature is due to his genes. Not sure if his feeding issues are too.

I'll read the links and also try and be more firm with sticking to my guns and not feeding him every hour!
I swear he would eat 10 sachets of good a day if I let him.
I do put dry food out for the cats too which he does snack on occasionally.

cozietoesie Tue 01-Oct-13 08:40:47

There's some advice on environmental enrichment at International Cat Care (formerly FAB.) However, their link on food foraging has gone AWOL (I think they may be setting up their website anew and haven't quite dotted all their 'i's) so have a look at this also.

Other posters may have some better sources.

cozietoesie Tue 01-Oct-13 08:26:05

Has your middle one got Siamese or oriental in him ? That all sounds very much like their sort of behaviour.

Your problem, Ghirly, is that you've given in - so rewarded the behaviour. They know now that if they're really obstreporous, you'll give them something.

I'm assuming that you maybe put down some dry kibble and they gobble that up rather than snacking ?

I'm afraid you're going to have to be tough hence a rather tiring week or so. Rigid feeding routine and a firm NO if they (especially middle one) beg at other times. And do not give in. At all.

What do they have in the way of toys to play with? It sounds also as if they need some additional stimulation. Have you thought about giving them some of their food in a feeding ball or two?

Ghirly Tue 01-Oct-13 03:58:22

I have 2 cats and a kitten.
Eldest is almost 2, middle one just turned 1 and the youngest is a 5 month old kitten.

My middle one has form for following me around meowing ALL the time, it's incessant.
He craves constant attention and no matter what I'm doing if I sit down he jumps up wanting to lie with me.

But that's a side issue.

His problem now is tha he is now constantly - and I mean every single time - I go to the kitchen he cries non stop to be fed.

I can feed him first thing then an hour later if I'm making breakfast or even just sweeping the floor, he will be expecting food.

As with the attention seeking (which I put down to him leaving his mum far far too early) it is become wearing, the long drawn out cries are becoming irritating. I can't get anything done as he is following me about getting under my feet.

When I got him neutered I mentioned his eating to the vet who told me not to feed him too much as neutered male cats put on weight very easily.

I've now taken to putting him outside if it hasn't been long since his last feed - but he just sits at the door crying to get in.

Now the kitten has started joining him with the craving for food - those two are thick as thieves and always together.

My eldest cat is a normal eater and never cries for food.

I don't want to over feed them but sometimes I feel I have to just to get a 5 minute break from the meowing!

Any tips/advice?

Sorry this is long and thankyou in advance.

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