Bringing home a 7 week old kitten on Friday...

(64 Posts)

I realise she's very young to leave Mum, but have little choice.
A family I work with have 10+ cats, including this kitten.
The others from the litter left at 5 weeks old sad
They are very keen to give her away as soon as they can. I persuaded them to keep her for the extra fortnight, but if I don't take her on Friday she will be homeless.
They do not have a litter tray, so the cats wee and poo in the house. She has been eating solid food, mainly given to her by Mum Cat, who has been taking food from bins and bringing it home to eat with the kittens. They have not been wormed or de flea'd, and are quite skinny.

I feel the kitten would be better coming home with me, as they are financially unable to feed or care for her properly, but I am worried about her young age.
I have booked a vets appointment for Saturday.

What can I do to make the transition easy for her? I do work, but only school hours, and have the weekend to settle her in before I have to leave her alone. Am so nervous, and keen to do my best after her difficult start.

Any cat experts out there tonight?

cozietoesie Wed 11-Sep-13 22:15:45

Not an expert here but you've come to the right place.

Can the current owners get Momcat neutered?

cozietoesie Wed 11-Sep-13 22:20:25

PS - 7 weeks is young so you'll likely have to train the kit to its litter tray as if it was a hand reared - but my darling Oneago was abandoned by his Mom at one day old and he made it through. She's got every chance.

I have given them details of our local PDSA but they lack motivation, despite me offering to transport them. The home circumstances are quite chaotic.
Am I doing the right thing, do you think?
Getting a kitten wasn't planned, though for the past 2 weeks I have been frantically researching and preparing.
One of the other kittens is on it's 3rd home already, having been attacked by a dog owned by its new family sad
I just know if I don't take it now, it will end up in the same situation as its Mum, flea ridden and almost constantly pregnant/nursing.

Kitten has never seen a litter tray! Mum cat goes outside whilst the kittens use the carpet or beds sad
The house has a very strong smell of cat waste.

MrsFrederickWentworth Wed 11-Sep-13 22:34:36

You are doing the right thing.

See if you can get something smelling of mom cat to put near it. If you have a non leaky type hot water bottle, eg the sort filled with grain that you heat in the microwave, put it with an alarm clock under a comfy blanket in the basket and the warmth and tick and smell will be comforting. And if you have a litter tray nearby, you' ll see, kitten will work things out. Cats are intelligent and clean animals . There will be mistakes bit unless it is feral, you should be fine.

Any way, that's what we used to to with ours

cozietoesie Wed 11-Sep-13 22:39:09

Yikes.

Okey Cokey - let's leave that home situation for another thread. (Which it probably needs.)

Cats/kittens are easy despite what you may read on here. As she's not been litter trained, clear the house temporarily of any expensive rugs (ie anything that can't be cleaned or dumped) and any valuable nick nacks.

Get a couple of litter trays, some litter (I always use Fuller's Earth clumping but other posters will likely have other suggestions) and some kitten food. Also, given the circumstances, lots of kitchen towel and a couple of spray Dettoxes or similar.

You don't need special bowls for her food and water - what you have in the cupboard will likely do - or go to the nearest charity shop on your next free day and get some cheap stuff there.

Will try that. I have a microwave heat pack with a fleecy cover.
I gave prepared a room for the cat to spend its first few days in. The floor is laminate so accidents won't be the end of the world. I just hope she is healthy.
I have bought good quality kitten food and a fleece blanket.

cozietoesie Wed 11-Sep-13 22:47:49

You are absolutely doing the right thing. It's maybe going to be a hard row to plough ('Oh for F's sake - not another shit on the floor?') but training her and having a happy cat at the end of the day will be wonderful for you.

I am so excited!

cozietoesie Wed 11-Sep-13 22:51:37

Of course!

smile

cozietoesie Wed 11-Sep-13 22:56:30

And remember - any problems and you can just come back here for views.

smile

kiriwawa Wed 11-Sep-13 23:00:35

I think Catsan ultraclumping is good for kittens - it's got a very fine texture which is easy for them to manipulate. Put her in the tray as soon as she's eaten and when she wakes up and hopefully she'll get the idea. Cats like to be clean so she should cotton on fairly quickly.

You need to feed her regularly if you can - any chance you can come home during the day to feed her at lunchtimes?

Starkitten Wed 11-Sep-13 23:00:49

Good luck with Kitty and don't worry if she hides in a corner for first few days! But...could you not get the RSPCA involved with those people? Anonymously? Breaks my heart that mum cat has to bin sweep for her little ones......

cozietoesie Wed 11-Sep-13 23:10:07

Likewise - but I'm judging that the OP has a professional relationship with the family so it's not straightforward.

cozietoesie Wed 11-Sep-13 23:10:07

Likewise - but I'm judging that the OP has a professional relationship with the family so it's not straightforward.

cozietoesie Wed 11-Sep-13 23:10:52

Tech is still off on holiday, eh?

OhDearNigel Wed 11-Sep-13 23:17:24

Op, unless you are already contacting social services, you need to. . What you're describing is unhealthy not only for cats but children as well.

You are right, my relationship with the family is professional. The situation is complex and professionally my priority is not the welfare of the animals.
As sad as it is, the area is an extremely deprived inner city and the circumstances in which the animals are kept is not uncommon.

I realise it is far from ideal, but my thinking is...at least I can help this one cat?

I did read somewhere that clumping litter is unsafe as kittens can ingest it or be adversely affected by the dust it creates. Is that not the case?

Unfortunately I can't come home at lunch to feed her.
I leave the house at 8 and my dd arrives home at around 2.45. Is this too long to go without food?

kiriwawa Wed 11-Sep-13 23:33:26

I'm feeding my 14 week old kittens every 4 hours. They're hungry little critters but then they're used to it and expect it. It's really about how much food you can get into them so you could split night into 2 - ie my kittens have a 12 hour break from 8pm till 8am but you could feed them when you go to bed and as soon as you get up.

I'm using the same litter that the rescue centre used - it's not dusty and I don't think they eat it. They do eat every other bloody thing though angry grin

5 weeks is tiny! Take lots of photos (next to things that show scale - I made my kittens pose next to cans of coke the other day!)

Ok.
So plan is feed at around 11.30pm, then again at 6.30am.
Dd can feed her at 2.45, then we could probably fit in 2 more meals before her last feed.

If I am aiming for 2-3 pouches a day I would need to feed her at least 4 times I think?
So nervous about getting this right!

cozietoesie Wed 11-Sep-13 23:45:19

She'll probably think she's in kitty heaven! She'll be fine.

smile

kiriwawa Wed 11-Sep-13 23:48:17

Sounds perfect! Once you let her out of the one room, you may want to get another litter tray. My 2 sometimes (like babies) forget to go until it's too late so another one in a more accessible area is a good idea.

Please could you post some pix when you get her? grin

cozietoesie Wed 11-Sep-13 23:54:25

OP

I've used clumping litter (natural Fuller's Earth) for more years and several cats. Without any problems.

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