Dog was attacked last week, now becoming aggressive towards other dogs- what to do?

(7 Posts)
Raahh Sun 27-Dec-15 20:48:53

last Monday, took ddog out, about 6pm, so dark. DD1 was with me. We were nearly home, turned a corner, and heard someone yell 'oi,come back' - next thing, a dog had our dog by the neck. After, we realised he hadn't been bitten, the other dog may have had his harness. But he wouldn't let go. Was scary. I have mine on a short-ish lead, as he gets over excited- the other dog was obviously not under control. Ddog didn't appear hurt- I think the blood on him was mine, as the other dog jumped at my hand first. The man with the other dog was pretty unpleasant, his dog was off lead on a busy footpath.

I got bitten, and ended up in A and E having a tetanus (and all the rings on my ring finger cut off sadly)- but more importantly, since then, ddog has seemed anxious, and then aggressive towards other dogs when out walking. I haven't let him close, but he has been snarling. He's 11 months, a mini schnauzer (vocal,at the best of times). Should I take him to the vet, or try something else? He's been fine in the house, usual self, but i'm worried this might have longer term effects.

My sister has a thunder jacket for her dog, after a similar incident. Are these any good?

We love our little fellow, and I don't want him to be anxious when out (he loves his walks).

(Sorry this is long).

LetThereBeCupcakes Sun 27-Dec-15 20:54:13

Have you been to the vet at all? Do that first, just in case.

Do YOU feel anxious? Moat dogs will pick up on their owner's anxieties which make things worse.

You need to set up lots of positive encountersbfor ddog, so he can gradually build up his confidence again. Keep him on lead, but don't pull it tight. Try not to let him feel trapped. Lots of positive reinforcement when he sees another dog, rewarding him for ignoring the dog or behaving how you would like him to. Don't shout at him, as this will reinforce his fear.

Do you have a good trainer that can help?

Raahh Sun 27-Dec-15 21:03:28

I'm taking him Tuesday, just for a check. I'm fine-I was annoyed at the other dog owner, and his attitude, but have been very clam with the dog. He has seemed ok when i took him out,apart from being a bit grumbly with a very docile lab we know well.grin.

Our groomer is also his trainer- I didn't think of her- thank you, she is lovely, so might take him for a nail trim, and a chat. He likes her a lot, thank you.

HarrietSchulenberg Sun 27-Dec-15 21:09:00

My large lurcher was attacked by a Yorkshire Terrier not long after we had him. Little nippy thing that kept ducking underneath him trying to bite his tummy. Yorkie (and owner) were damned lucky that mine was too confused to get hold of him as he'd have killed the terrier.
He is now quite nervous around other dogs when on his lead, although friendly and playful when off.
I found that giving treats (fistfuls on some occasions) and making him sit as other dogs approach and pass helps, but if I forget the treats he still growls and tries to approach the other dog. Some dogs he is fine with, even on lead, and they can have a good old wag and sniff, but others he is not.
I also find that making slightly embarrassing encouraging, positive noises when he first spots another dog helps. It is not unknown for me to coo "Looook, doggy buddy" in a slightly daft sing-song voice to make him more relaxed.
I think the main thing is to find a way to make sure that meeting other dogs becomes a postive, not scary, experience.
Alternatively, I met someone with a whole team of huskies who had trained her dogs to just ignore others when passing, mainly by commanding "Ignore" when approaching. It worked, but was a bit strange.

Bubble2bubble Sun 27-Dec-15 21:19:12

This happened to one of my dogs, who had previously adored other dogs. It got so bad after an attack that I got a behaviourist to see him. She likened him to a person who had been mugged - very often a person becomes not just scared of being mugged again, but just generally very anxious. Ddog was now nervous of other dogs, but also now scared of traffic, and was very stressed in strange places. ( absolutely fine and normal at home )
I spent a lot of time reinforcing his recall ( this had also gone disastrously wrong since the attack ) and getting him to pay more attention to me both in general and in potentially stressful situations, using food. The aim is eventually that he will look to me if there is something that frightens him, rather than going in to attack IYSWIM.
You do need to get advice, and start helping him sooner rather than later, your poor little guy has had bad fright

MsAdorabelleDearheartVonLipwig Sun 27-Dec-15 22:13:02

No advice to add, it's all very good so far, but just wanted to agree with Harriet about being very positive around the dog in situations out and about so he gradually forgets his anxiety.

Oh and I sympathise about the rings. I had to have mine cut off after I hurt that finger and it swelled up. On the plus side, I had the rings properly resized when I had then repaired and now they fit better. grin

MsAdorabelleDearheartVonLipwig Sun 27-Dec-15 22:15:45

Had them repaired. Still have fat fingers.

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