Advice on overassertive puppy bullying older dog please.

(12 Posts)

Hi. We have a 12-year-old collie x, who has always been very gentle and unassertive, as was my last dog. Both bitches.
We have just got a new puppy, a cocker spaniel x, also female. She is 9 weeks old and we have had her for a week and a half.
Everyone warned us that the old dog might be grumpy with the puppy; it seems to be the other way round. Puppy eats old dog's food and when old dog comes into the room when puppy is eating, puppy gives one loud yap and old dog leaves the room. Old dog turns her face away when puppy goes up to her.
Two problems:
1) I love my old dog - my dog - and want her to be happy
2) I don't want the puppy to grow up into an aggressive, over assertive dog, especially since we have a young child - puppy is to be her dog and she is very responsible (8).
Puppy has already had a proper yapping scrap with someone else's puppy and sometimes growls when playing with DD.

Don't let the puppy eat the older dogs food. Make it clear that is not an option. Ensure the puppy learns good manners, and that does not include stealing someone elses food or chasing them out of a room.

Puppy's are full of beans, play is full on and she is bound to growl and yap. It's what puppies do. It often sounds blood curdling but as long as they're going back for more, they're enjoying themselves. If they try and back off or slink away, it's time to intervene and stop the game.

Old dog is turning her face away to give the pup a clear 'dog signal' that she is uninterested in playing. It's how puppies learn who to approach and what to do. It will gradually change as the pup learns how to approach with good manners, but for the time being, it's just dog chat. It doesn't mean old dog is unhappy. It means old dog is making her position very clear.

7to25 Wed 06-Aug-14 07:30:52

I think that dogs find their own hierarchy and humans can do little about it. Other wiser people may give you tips but I think that dogs are happy if they know where they are in the pecking order (mixed metaphor). I think that you can always feed the older dog first and make the puppy wait.

Locked puppy in her cage this morning while feeding older dog; lots of howling! Trouble is, she is irrepressible - no amount of saying 'no' makes any difference.
I am wondering if she is getting too much fuss and attention. Since she can't go on the ground before her vaccinations are up to date, she is carried when we go out and obviously all DD's friends want to play with her and cuddle her.
I don't want a dog that will guard her food or snap at children, so need good advice .. maybe I am over thinking?

outtolunchagain Wed 06-Aug-14 07:41:38

I know the puppy is a cross but have you been on cockersonline.co.uk , cocker spaniels can be quite difficult puppies , but they turn into lovely dogs wink, they are however often quite bumptious mouthy puppies with cockerdile teeth and a tendency to very mad moments shock

Cockersonline was my lifeline with my cocker puppy , now a fab family dog, lots of advice on how to handle them , on the forum , loads of people managing puppies and older dogs and children and also very reassuring .

outtolunchagain Wed 06-Aug-14 07:42:27

Love your name by the way!

Off to cockersonline; thanks!

Try them eating together and watch them. Keep pup on a lead if necessary.

EvenBetter Wed 06-Aug-14 22:31:51

From what I've read on the excellent Facebook group, keep them separate, don't make them have to spend time with each other and the baby keep practicing unwanted behaviour. They don't understand 'no', you have to show them what you want them to do instead which takes time and many many treats!
Nine weeks is such a baby! She'll be learning so much every minute. Jealous, my baby is now almost a year old, I miss her puppyhood!

Which excellent Facebook group??

Lilcamper Thu 07-Aug-14 09:01:16

Thank you.

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now