What dog shall I get?

(20 Posts)
tygertygerburningbright Mon 31-Mar-14 19:04:44

I'm going to get a dog, I know a little about dogs in general. I attempted to get rehome a puppy a few months ago, a nine months old staffie. But when I brought her home she jumped straight over the baby gate into ds (3.5) 's room. So I just knew I couldn't sleep easy knowing she could get in there.
I gave her to a friend and borrow her regularly but only when ds is not home because I just don't know that I could control her as she is so big and I didn't have her from a pup.
So im thinking small dog, have been looking at pomeranian and chihuahua puppies but everyone says chihuahuas are mean!
Are there any small to medium dogs that are not yappy/scary?

Owllady Mon 31-Mar-14 19:07:03

If you are scared of digs I think it's more than misguided to get one!
What is your motivation for wanting one?

Isthatwhatdemonsdo Mon 31-Mar-14 19:10:30

Chihuahua's can be snappy. However I don't think you should be getting a dog.

tygertygerburningbright Mon 31-Mar-14 19:11:58

I am not scared of dogs. I actually think I was being quite sensible not to have a giant staffy who was already almost a year old as my first dog.

My motivation to get a dog is that staffy. I have her regularly and I love her. She is the most loving and sweet creature I have ever known. But, and it's a valid but, as an inexperienced dog owner if she were to flip out or something I wouldn't have the strength to overpower her. I just think you can't be careful enough when you have young kids.

TheBuggerlugs Mon 31-Mar-14 19:37:11

ANY dog, large or small can flip out. I also think getting a dog isn't a good idea.

Being driven by a certain breed is why there are so many badly owned dogs out there who are bought because they are cute, or small or whatever and they tend to be badly bred unless you are prepared to pay a lot from a proper breeder, and be misunderstood. As dogs go, staffies are fantastic but like all dogs they have a lot of needs, you won't find a dog that will just move in with you like it's been with you years.

TheBuggerlugs Mon 31-Mar-14 19:40:58

Oh and personally I wouldn't get a puppy either. They are major hard work, more than you probably imagine. Could you speak to the RSPCA about the EARS scheme and get an older dog that is used to living with a family. That may be a good starter for 10 and you may get years from an older dog.

We have just got our first family dog a poodle shih tzu cross. We have waited until our youngest child was 11 (eldest is 27) and tbh I think we were right to wait.I never considered that a dog might flip out because I knew I'd put in the time energy and money required to make sure he was well socialised and trained and chose Eric because he is small and doesn't shed hair mostly. Having a puppy is really hard work and I think it would be really hard to balance the puppy's needs with a young child's tbh.
Eric is a sweet little thing but he nips, he steals anything that is left lying about, he needs taking on the garden every hour or so (was 30 minutes), he wants attention most of the day. Dd understands this and is pretty independent but I'd say a pre schooler might find it really difficult.

ilovemydoggy Mon 31-Mar-14 19:45:16

I have a chihuahua and he is not snappy 1 bit. My niece pulls him about , won't let him do anything constantly picking him up and he just takes it. You can see in his face his thinking ffs let me sleep. She even dunked the poor little sod in the swimming pool last year and he took no notice. We have bought our chihuahua up though very much as a part if the family rather than a dog.

ilovemydoggy Mon 31-Mar-14 19:47:16

This is my little man Elvis.

tygertygerburningbright Mon 31-Mar-14 19:47:39

I think maybe I came across like I was scared or nervous about dogs in my op. Honestly I'm not. I've been around dogs all my life jyst never had one of my own.

I'm not expecting the dog to 'flip out' but I well aware that I have a very young child and wouldn't keep a dog unless it was safe. I also do know that it takes a lot of time and effort to try to ensure your dog can be trusted.

I'm confident that I can raise a puppy, but I am interested to hear about older dogs because I always thought that they were harder work than a puppy because you don't know their history etc. Perhaps I should talk to the dogs trust or someone similar.

tygertygerburningbright Mon 31-Mar-14 19:50:06

My main reason for giving the staffy to a friend was that I didn't know her well and she could have got into my son's room at night. Honestly now I know her I wish I kept her! But I'm a firm believer of better safe than sorry, especially when it comes to animals.

Spookymum Mon 31-Mar-14 19:53:09

We have a Chihuahua that is 9 months old, had him since he was an 8 week old tiny bundle of fluff. I also have 3 children aged 7, 5 and 20 months and our puppy is amazing with them.

I think Chihuahuas unfortunately have a reputation of being snappy little things but I think that is when they are carried round like an accessory! Ours is treat like a dog, he loves going for walks, has been easy to house train and also learnt to sit, down, stay etc

He adores being with the children, even the 20 month old he will climb on him wanting to play. I obviously watch them when together as I would any dog but he is very easy going and quite laid back.

YNK Mon 31-Mar-14 19:55:18

You don't need to be able to overpower a dog in order to train it. That Cesar milan type dominance theory has been totally discredited by research.

Your staffy was being over enthusiastic in greeting your son. She needs 4 on the floor training! If she is this keen on affection (most staffys are) she should be really easy to train!

It's Me or the Dog vids are on you tube (Victoria Stilwell).

YNK Mon 31-Mar-14 19:57:21

If you go on FB there is a great group called Dog Training Advice and Support. They will give great advice for 4 on the floor!

YNK Mon 31-Mar-14 19:59:08
coffetofunction Mon 31-Mar-14 20:03:59

I can understand your worries. We thought about rehoming a dog however we were lead to believe a dog should be brought up with children. We have a jack russel bitch who we've had for near 3 years. She's fantastic, but I am always aware that she could turn.

Small dogs are well known for "small dog syndrome"...I recommend a jack russell every day of the week but that's because she was right for our family. I would suggest looking round, speaking to dog owners, vets, ect & then when you have all your info choose one. There's no right smile

coffetofunction Mon 31-Mar-14 20:05:36

I can understand your worries. We thought about rehoming a dog however we were lead to believe a dog should be brought up with children. We have a jack russel bitch who we've had for near 3 years. She's fantastic, but I am always aware that she could turn.

Small dogs are well known for "small dog syndrome"...I recommend a jack russell every day of the week but that's because she was right for our family. I would suggest looking round, speaking to dog owners, vets, ect & then when you have all your info choose one. There's no right smile

YNK Mon 31-Mar-14 20:32:38

My wirehaired terrier can jump much higher than my staffy although he's half the size!

Gileswithachainsaw Mon 31-Mar-14 20:38:15

What ever dog you get it's going to need training. You really need to look into this, you can't keep giving them away to friends the second it escapes from a room. Most dogs do things you don't want them to do, it's your job to train it and teach it not to.

Please, think long and hard about getting one.

my pup jumped over the baby gate.

I got a higher dog-gate

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