1 puppy jabs

(10 Posts)
defonamechangedforthis Mon 24-Mar-14 21:51:56

opinions on walking pup after 1st jab and before 2nd?

WeAllHaveWings Mon 24-Mar-14 21:55:31

We were told They are not fully protected until several days after 2nd jab, so why would you take the risk?

defonamechangedforthis Mon 24-Mar-14 22:44:55

I did not say I was taking risks. I just wondered opinions. is it actually medically the case of them not being fully protected until after the second?

Lonecatwithkitten Mon 24-Mar-14 22:50:31

The first injection primes the immune system, the second one imparts the true immunity.
Only last month I saw parvovirus in a puppy who had been taken out after his first injection. He did survive, but he spent 3 days on a drip and he has long term bowel damage that is preventing him absorbing vitamin B12 requiring regular injections.

cashewfrenzy Tue 25-Mar-14 08:29:17

There is a huge gulf of difference between walking a puppy on a busy route before they are fully vaccinated and carefully socialising a puppy in safe circumstances. For many years we vets have focused only on physical health but new science and an awareness of the risks of abnormal social development have led to a chance in the advice I now give. Look at the AVSAB guidelines (bottom statement on this page): avsabonline.org/resources/position-statements

Keeping young dogs confined to the home until 10 or 12 weeks of age is harmful to their social development. There is a short window of opportunity ( from 6-14 weeks of age, even less in herding breeds) and it's critical that puppies are exposed to a wide range of experience during this period. Many many more dogs are put to sleep in the first 3 years of life than die from diseases which could be vaccinated against.

You need to discuss with your vet the specific risks in your area before deciding what is safe for your puppy. You may also wish to look at the kennel club's Puppy Plan website which gives lots of information on socialisation, why it's important, what it entails and how to go about it. They also have a fabulous YouTube channel.

cashewfrenzy Tue 25-Mar-14 08:31:04

*change, not chance

And the Puppy Plan website: thepuppyplan.com/

cashewfrenzy Tue 25-Mar-14 08:35:28

Sorry stll half asleep!

Many more dogs are put to sleep due to behavioural problems in the first 3 years of life, than die from communicable disease. ie lack of socialisation is more likely to kill a dog. Of course most under-socialised dogs aren't put to sleep but many of them have behaviour difficulties which affect their, and their owners', quality of life - anxiety and aggression.

HavantGuard Tue 25-Mar-14 08:49:48

I wouldn't risk it but recognised the benefits of socialisation, so I have had mine out and about in my arms from 10 weeks (after the second jab.) They get to see, hear and smell everything from a safe place. I've sat on a bench outside a small shopping area so they got used to the sights and sounds of people and cars, sat in a park so they see plenty of dogs, sat near a playground so they are used to the sounds of children. I've stroked shopping trollies to show them they're safe and held them out to sniff them. I have treated after every loud noise, person passing etc so they see it as no big deal. You start out somewhere quiet and build to busier places. People come up and say hello to them and you can get them to give a treat. As soon as they can be near other dogs you get them to meet a good, easy going one and then to puppy classes and start meeting as many dogs as possible.

There are ways to balance risk and benefit without endangering their health.

defonamechangedforthis Tue 25-Mar-14 22:23:13

thank you for your messages. Unfortunately she is too big to be carried. think great dane sized pup. she does have another dog around so is socialising that way.
we are keen to introduce new opportunities and experiences to her as soon as possible obviously due to her potential size!

HavantGuard Wed 26-Mar-14 06:29:45

I've carried similar! It beats the gym. You take a blanket or towel and settle somewhere with them on your lap. Assuming you drive it is possible.

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now