My doggy has hip dysplasia :-(

(3 Posts)
HoHoBrandyButter Mon 10-Dec-12 22:31:40

Just that really. We got her from a rescue a few months ago and she's five. Had her x-rayed as she was snapping when people stroked her in certain spots and the vet has said her hips are really bad.

I've got painkillers and food supplements for her but not sure what else happens next. Can anyone advise me please? Vet is sending X-rays to a specialist to check. My poor furry friend - no wonder she got narky with people touching her!

tabulahrasa Tue 11-Dec-12 11:29:42

I don't really know what happens next either - my puppy is currently at the vets getting x-rays done though.

There are operations available, obviously I don't know whether they're an option for your dog and apart from that it's a case of keeping them as lean as possible, not overexercising and pain killers and what have you.

BookieMonster Tue 11-Dec-12 15:17:08

I think it depends on whether the dysplasia has been present long enough to start wearing down the joint.
In young pups that are still growing, TPO surgery can be performed which will help stop that progression. It is major surgery, very expensive and requires significant recovery time with complete rest and confinement. BookieDog1 had TPO performed on both hips for severe dysplasia when she was 10 months and then 14 months old. There's a small window of opportunity for this while they're still growing.
AFAIA, once the condition has progressed to the point of significant wear and tear on the joint and osteoarthritis, you could be looking at symptom management (anti inflammatory meds, painkillers etc) or joint replacement surgery. Obviously, it depends on the severity of the condition. It really needs a specialist to look at the x-rays and then chat through the options with you.
It's horrible news to hear and I'm really sorry this is happening to you and your furry one.
In the meantime, try fish oil and glucosamine supplements. They really do help joint problems.

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