Educating Yorkshire C4 9pm

(629 Posts)
DameEdnasBridesmaid Thu 05-Sep-13 20:28:03

Am looking forward to this, RL Waterloo Rd?

AutumnLeavesaGoGo Fri 11-Oct-13 11:59:26

bringbacksideburns, I remember the Jamie Oliver School programme when Alvin Hall pointed out that all the kids described by everyone else as clever were not, they had "street smarts".

I think we are too gentle for fear of harming their self-esteem, when achievement is actually the answer to that.

Why didn't the teacher choose where the kids sit? They did that in maths in my bog-standard years ago.

hattymattie Fri 11-Oct-13 12:24:20

Autumn I remember that programme and I agree entirely.

I also could not understand why the blondes weren't separated. I get the feeling that a lot of time is spent on these kids and the smarter ones are ignored or dragged down.

YoureBeingADick Fri 11-Oct-13 12:38:59

The higher acheivers/more capable are of no interest to the teachers wrt class time/attention as they will already be getting their A-C grades which is all the school needs from them. The ones who will get D or lower get the attention because it will bring them up to A-C grades which is the all important thing. The ones who will get those grades anyway have to find a way themselves- outside of class time to improve their predicted grades. Very frustrating.

TheDietStartsTomorrow Fri 11-Oct-13 13:01:23

I'm still talking about a previous episode here, but I think Hadiqa was a wonderful, polite, humble, clever, articulate, friendly and kind girl. She made friends with a girl who was clearly nowhere near as clever and pretty as her and she loved her friend for who she was. He friend on the other had, took some time realising that she herself needs to decide who her friends are and not the rest of the gang dictate this.

Alexandrite Fri 11-Oct-13 13:16:34

The episode with Hadiqua was depressing. She was a lovely girl but treated horribly by other girls.

Damnautocorrect Fri 11-Oct-13 13:28:22

I don't think exams are easier but I do think kids are coached to pass rather than taught, also there's often the opportunity to resubmit coursework. Also, past papers are used as study aids and by looking at the study aids teachers can work out what's likely to come up this time.

curlew Fri 11-Oct-13 13:33:49

"The higher acheivers/more capable are of no interest to the teachers wrt class time/attention as they will already be getting their A-C grades which is all the school needs from them. The ones who will get D or lower get the attention because it will bring them up to A-C grades which is the all important thing. The ones who will get those grades anyway have to find a way themselves- outside of class time to improve their predicted grades. Very frustrating."

Not true. Schools are judged on their A*-Cs. But they are also judged on whether or not low, middle and high attaining pupils make "expected progress". So somebody coming in to the school on a level 5 and getting a c at GCSE would not be considered to have made expected progress and the school would be held to account for it.

Also C is what colleges and employers want, which is why schools bust a gut to get their kids there. It's not all self interest, you know!

Alexandrite Fri 11-Oct-13 15:46:26

Yes that's right Curlew. I think in the past schools may have got away with just concentrating on the borderline C's and not bothering with the sure thing A-Cs, but that is no longer the case. I've noticed a few recent OFSTED reports (grammar and comp) where it has been picked up by OFSTED that the highest attainers on entry to the school could have made more progress and our local secondary have highlighted progress of highest attainers as something they will concentrate on as a result. There is a boys grammar in Kent who recently failed OFSTED because they were concentrating on 5 X A-C but the highest attainers could have made more progress.

nomorecrumbs Fri 11-Oct-13 15:56:36

Tiredemma you probably weren't taught to the test as GCSE pupils are now. It's not that the papers are getting easier as such, it's just that every single lesson is geared towards how to pass them.

CallumMsMummy Fri 11-Oct-13 20:58:58

A bit OT but is it normal for teenage girls to make themselves look so similar?! I know there are fashion trends etc but they are like clones. I don't remember any of the girls at school having exactly the same hairstyle/ accesories etc but I saw a group of 6 girls about 16/17 years old at the bus stop today with literally the same hairstyle, clothes and accessories but in different colours. What happened to individuality?

YoureBeingADick Fri 11-Oct-13 21:47:17

callums I notice this a lot too with local teens. I have to say I didn't notice it when I was at school but maybe that was to do with the fact that I was familiar with all the faces around me and could distinguish between who was who and didn't notice if four friends dressed/looked similar. but also because my school was very strict on uniform code and no make-up. hair had to be tied up in a blue or navy hair bobble, no 'messy' styles, no make-up or nail varnish or extensions no jewellery, blouses buttoned to the top and ties done properly so there was very little room for individuality or 'cloning' in my school as everyone had to have their uniform the same and their hair the same unless it was too short to tie up. the only thing I can think of that some girls did was wear their hair in a very high and tight ponytail and some of them tried very hard to get away with wearing scarves (school scarves only) indoors and tucked into their jumpers.it looked odd grin

Alexandrite Fri 11-Oct-13 22:54:40

I can imagine that in the late 80s people might have thought all teenage girls had perms/electric blue mascara/twilight teaser lipstick. It was really just a group of girls in each class that had it though (with the makeup toned down in school.) Same thing now. It might seem like they all have blonde scraped up hair and heavy make up. Some do, but if you look at a whole class of girls, most don't I'd think.

Alexandrite Sat 12-Oct-13 17:27:44

The Ofsted report for the Educating Yorkshire school rates the behaviour there as good. Does this mean that children tend to put on their best behaviour for Ofsted? Or is it just that the behaviour there is good most of the time, but the makers show only the very worst behaviour over the course of year and make it look a lot worse than it really is?

chocoluvva Sat 12-Oct-13 18:53:44

Probably the latter.

DameEdnasBridesmaid Thu 17-Oct-13 21:22:07

Oh please let Jack do history mr Steer smile

DameEdnasBridesmaid Thu 17-Oct-13 21:49:15

Don't think Jack is going to last long, his behaviour doesn't seem half as bad as Georgia's was.

Nerfmother Thu 17-Oct-13 21:50:58

Jack needs more support: external advice? Getting mum to pick him up to cool down? Illegal.

Is it? my DD was sent home to cool down a few times in high school, she has issues with kicking off in school and sometimes it was better for her to be home than be in the school throwing chairs around and then getting excluded. never thought it was illegal

Nerfmother Thu 17-Oct-13 22:06:00

Yup google unofficial exclusions. If a child isn't excluded formally ( fixed or permanent plus paperwork) it's illegal.

Alexandrite Thu 17-Oct-13 22:08:37

Wish we'd had the pastoral care in our high school that they have in EY. We had none. I think it's great.

Nerfmother Thu 17-Oct-13 22:09:16

http://www.ace-ed.org.uk/advice-about-education-for-parents/exclusion_from_school/PermanentExclusion/DecisionExcludePerm/Unofficial

Alexandrite Thu 17-Oct-13 23:51:32

If the parents and child feel they would be happier at home it seems a shame for it to be illegal

Nerfmother Fri 18-Oct-13 06:26:28

Alternatively the school can't just send kids home instead of seeking help. Long term planning rather than an easy opt out. Plus parents of kids with sen have no evidence of not coping.

Mrspebble Fri 18-Oct-13 13:39:21

I think to say it is illegal is harsh..it was the most sensible thing to do call his mother. Parents have to support schools and are the primary educators.

They were great with him I thought.

I feel for children who are well behaved and miss out because of poor behaviour of others. At least they have a system to allow children to get self esteem support outside of usual classes.

Nerfmother Fri 18-Oct-13 21:05:51

Okay but it's factual to call it illegal. Schools are not allowed to send a pupil home to cool off. So maybe the law is harsh; I'm just pointing it out.

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