how much sleep does your teenage daughter get?

(7 Posts)
RubySparks Fri 26-Feb-16 20:49:18

Concerned that 15 year old DD is oversleeping! She can go to bed at 10 and not wake until midday or 1pm (on a weekend). This causes problems on school days where she goes to bed at 9/10 but massively struggles to get up for school. She is supposed to leave about 10 to 8 but usually isn't up to get bus and ends up being driven and usually arriving late. It is rare she gets to school every day, she definitely is late 2/3 days per week.

The days she does get up early enough to get to school, she will quite likely need a sleep when she gets home about 4pm! This has been going on for at least a year with little change. Bloods were done last year but showed nothing (full blood count, coeliac test not sure what else).

I am pretty sure she isn't staying up late without us knowing - we have poor internet so tend to know when anyone is using it!

Is this just a growing stage, hormones, or something else?

Walkingonsunshine00 Sat 27-Feb-16 11:45:36

Has she been checked for anemia?

Walkingonsunshine00 Sat 27-Feb-16 11:45:56

Has she been checked for anemia?

BertieBotts Sat 27-Feb-16 13:05:22

It can be a normal thing for teenagers but it can also be something called Delayed Sleep Phase Syndrome. This is highly correlated with ADHD if she has any signs of that.

BertieBotts Sat 27-Feb-16 13:06:14

It can be a normal thing for teenagers but it can also be something called Delayed Sleep Phase Syndrome. This is highly correlated with ADHD if she has any signs of that.

BertieBotts Sat 27-Feb-16 13:07:51

It can be a normal thing for teenagers but it can also be something called Delayed Sleep Phase Syndrome. This is highly correlated with ADHD if she has any signs of that.

RubySparks Sat 27-Feb-16 18:44:26

Thanks for both thoughts - sorry I posted this thread twice! Not anaemic as had bloods done last year and nothing showed up. Not sure about ADHD symptoms but will take a look at that.

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