Anything I can do for depressed bereaved guinea?

(6 Posts)

seeker all the GPs I had when I was a child lived out their days once the others had gone. As single pigs. But they were free ranging round the house apart from the Himalayand who for their own safety lived under the stairs or in the back room (we had a boar in the front room who was dad to one sow)

We did try to introduce another but they didn't get on.

If they are inside, you can gauge the behaviour, and if you've noticed he's perking up, then that's excellant. (Interest in food is always a good sign with pigs. I worry when mine don't attack the food like they're starved)

It's a dilemma when you've got a single boar who has always been a part of a duo. Something I think about with my pair.

Lots of cuddles for piggie and see how he goes.
Does he go out in summer?
That's what would be my decider really. A day outside with no company would be lonely.
Would you boy be fit to neuter? Then get a pair of sows perhaps? For company for each other too?

seeker Sun 17-Feb-13 19:20:51

Well, he suddenly seems much better today. Squeaking again, showing an interest in the fridge door opening, scurrying about the cage......do you think he's over the worst?

KRITIQ Thu 14-Feb-13 00:37:57

I've found consistently that it's about at the 2 week mark that it really hits home for the surviving piggie that they are alone, and it hits hard. I remember one of my early boars, who was very gregarious and loved people company - I thought he would probably be okay on his own, got to that fortnight and just hit rock bottom. He stopped squeaking, just lost his sparkle. I signed him up for boar dating and he found a nice older gentleman companion and the spring was back in his step straight away.

Since then, I always aim to find a new companion within that 2 week period. Failing that, I take them with me - yes, nearly everywhere. I have lots of photos of guinea pigs in offices and pubs! smile

The idea of fostering is a good one. Perhaps you could look after a pair of boars that would be next to your fella, so he would know he isn't alone. I don't think it's anthropomorphising seeker. Guineas do experience genuine, deep grief.

silver73 Wed 13-Feb-13 23:20:05

Could you borrow a friend from a GP rescue? A sort of fostering arrangement?

guineapiglet Wed 13-Feb-13 15:23:28

Hi seeker, I do remember your posts about your guinea passing away, it sounds like you have done everything you can to keep his companion company - it is very sad for the last guinea left, when they have been used to a lifelong companion, they are just like humans in that they feel grief and pine in their own way, Other than trying again with a new set of babies to keep him company, or another singleton looking for a companion,( I remember you said you didnt want to do that) there isn't really a solution to his loneliness other than doing what you are doing, keeping him part of the family, carrying him around, making sure he is looked after. I can't remember how old your other boy was? Guineas are sensitive little souls, they greatly miss their life partners, the best thing you can do is keep them warm, well fed and well loved.

seeker Wed 13-Feb-13 14:55:28

He's ewting and drinking, but he's completely quiet, doesn't want to play and is just sitting, he looks well enough- although I am aware he might be on the way out, he is the same age as his brother who dies 2 weeks ago. But he does seem sad rather than ill- or amni anthropomorphising? He is in the living room and getting loads of human attention. Is there anything else I can do?

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