MA in Childhood and Youth or MA in Philosophy (OU)?

(5 Posts)
MrscremeEgg Tue 09-Apr-13 18:43:03

If I had my time again, I would work out what I wanted to do and then study something leading to that iyswim. Would have saved myself the time and heartache and expense!

Also, dissertations are generally the higher prestige option. How would a lack of one affect phd chances?

NumberOneNumpty Tue 09-Apr-13 13:23:53

I'm actually thinking about starting my own business so my future employer might be me! And I'm not fussed about the lack of a dissertation! But if that doesn't work out I'm thinking about going into education as a teaching assistant or learning mentor, or maybe training as a teacher (have worked in schools before). I would also maybe be interested in doing a PhD. Both subjects look interesting to me.

MrscremeEgg Mon 08-Apr-13 22:27:41

What do you want to get out of it?

If you want to work in childhood and youth, then that seems ideal. Not sure what philosophy could lead to?

However, if it's just a labour of love, then do the one that interests you more.

NumberOneNumpty Mon 08-Apr-13 22:23:48

Sorry, an 'Issues in social and political philosophy' module.

NumberOneNumpty Mon 08-Apr-13 22:17:34

So I have a PG Cert in Social Sciences from the OU, and am thinking about topping it up to an MA, also with the OU.

I like the look of both the MA in Childhood and Youth and the MA in Philosophy. Both allow for the general transfer of 60 credits, so no problems there.

Childhood and Youth would involve doing two compulsory 60-credit modules. Philosophy would involve doing one compulsory 60-credit module (the 'Postgraduate foundation module in philosophy') and a dissertation.

Will other universities/future employers look down on Childhood and Youth because it doesn't involve a dissertation? It is pretty unusual for an MA not to include one. Or will Childhood and Youth (vocational) improve my employment prospects more than Philosophy (academic)?

In the usual way of things, students on the Philosophy MA do the foundation module, then an 'Issues in contemporary social and political philosophy module', then the dissertation. Will I struggle to do the dissertation if I haven't studied that 'meaty' second module? I already have some ideas for what I could do it on.

Any advice much appreciated.

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