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Are your family's finances protected by your employer provided benefits package? Add your thoughts and you could win a £100 giftcard - NOW CLOSED

(92 Posts)
AnnMumsnet (MNHQ) Mon 01-Jul-13 10:57:54

According to a new report commissioned by leading financial protection provider Unum, today's employees are more likely to fall into financial difficulty than they were 30 years ago. The report suggests that this is partly down to the fact that employee benefits - designed to provide financial protection - have failed to keep pace with the changing UK workforce which now has more women and older workers plus more workers who are disable or suffering a long-term illness.

In fact, the report identifies that people with caring responsibilities - such as mothers with children - are one of three groups that are most 'at risk' of being left financially exposed owing to an employer provided benefits package that isn't fit for purpose.

So, Unum are asking you:

What employer provided benefits you are entitled to, and how could your employer provided benefits package better support you as a modern employee with caring responsibilities?

For example:
~ Does your employer provided benefits package entitle you to flexible working to help make it easier for you to carry out caring responsibilities?
~ Does it entitle you to income protection so that if you become ill you have the best chance of getting better quickly - without having to worry about losing your monthly wage - so as not to impact on your caring responsibilities?
~ Are you entitled to fewer employer provided benefits because you work part time, and does this impact your ability to carry out your caring responsibilities?

Add your thoughts to this thread and you'll be entered into a prize draw where one MNer picked at random will win £100 giftcard from One4All (which can be spent at 17,000 outlets nationwide)

For more information, visit the Unum pages on MN.

Thanks, MNHQ

ratbagcatbag Mon 01-Jul-13 11:48:38

I work for a big multinational corp that started in the uk.

We are allowed flexible working but it is dependant on your area and management as well as your role. Traditionally it's a very male dominated company,but I've never had issues and have always been given off with pay in an emergency without question. Again depends on your manager.

I'm currently on maternity leave and get 18 weeks full pay which appears to be quite good smile

Sick pay etc depends on length of service, I've been there 14 years this year and get six months full pay,my DH who's been there 30 plus years gets two years full pay. However it has been known if your sick pay is about to run out, if you return for one week,you're then entitled to sick pay starting from the beginning again.

Finally flexi day times are very much the norm, so long as core hours are covered which are 9:30 to 3:00. So I tend to do 7-3, others 8:30 to 4:30 etc.

I find them a very good employer, the only thing I'd be happier with would be a nursery on site, I don't mind it not being subsidised, but it would be fab to have it that close.

ratbagcatbag Mon 01-Jul-13 11:49:03

You should now close the discussion so I win the voucher grin

CMOTDibbler Mon 01-Jul-13 12:29:19

I work for a moderate sized company (200 in UK, 5000 worldwide) who are US based which is incredibly male dominated, especially in management roles.
Maternity pay is stat minimum, flexible working is very much at the direct discretion of your direct manager (but many roles are very specialised so finding another part timer would be impossible). No corporate flexibility things at all. All benefits are pro rated for part timers, inc car allowance.

We do get great sick pay though.

DH works for a very large multinational, and they have a flexible benefits package which allows you to buy extra holiday days if you wish to, and choose from a portfolio of items such as health care. He got really good sick pay and superb support services when on long term sick leave.

One thing I've noticed is that theres a lot of talk about helping employees manage their caring responsibities for young children, but nothing about caring for elderly parents. Mine have had a series of crises lately, and though HR are sympathetic I can get no help at all apart from being allowed to take unpaid leave if I need

I work full time for a large organisation. Flexi is the norm, so i can pretty much dictate my own hours.

No income protection scheme as such, but sick pay is full pay for 6 months, then half pay for 6 months.

Special Leave can be granted on approval from HR, but thats normally for family funerals etc.

If my manager were not so keen on my working from home, I would struggle when my mum is ill. She childminds for me. My DS is 12 now, and the policies only apply to dependants under 5 yo.

BornToFolk Mon 01-Jul-13 13:48:30

I work for a large mulitnational corporation in a part time, support type role. The benefits package that we get is flexible so you can choose which benefits you get, up to a certain value (depending on your role, salary and length of service) It includes the car scheme, medical insurance, pension etc.

Childcare vouchers are included in this benefits package

~ Does your employer provided benefits package entitle you to flexible working to help make it easier for you to carry out caring responsibilities?

We're entitled to request flexible working but not necessarily to have it approved! There are lots of conditions, i.e. flexi-working is not allowed. You have to stick to an agreed working patter. I changed my hours when my DS started school to be part time. I'm also a parent governor at DS's school and I'm allowed paid time off for governor duties.

~ Does it entitle you to income protection so that if you become ill you have the best chance of getting better quickly - without having to worry about losing your monthly wage - so as not to impact on your caring responsibilities?

Erm, I had to look this up to find out what I am actually entitled to!

Sick pay at 100% of usual income is up to 26 weeks (after 1 year's service)

Income protection is provided as a fixed benefit but it looks as though it only kicks in after a year...Personal accident benefit is also included. Critical illness and personal injury insurance are also available as options but I decided against those as I have private critical illness/injury insurance.

~ Are you entitled to fewer employer provided benefits because you work part time, and does this impact your ability to carry out your caring responsibilities?

Well, the benefits package is related to salary so as my salary is pro-rated for being part time, so are my benefits. I don't feel that it benefits on my caring responsibilities though as the reason I am part time is to look after my son. None of my benefits are directly related to my son. I could claim childcare vouchers but as I understand it, I'd still be able to claim up to the full amount (£243), even thought I'm part time?

firawla Mon 01-Jul-13 13:54:11

my dh work does give health care for him and the family, i would like him to be given more flexible working hours

EeTraceyluv Mon 01-Jul-13 14:30:26

I work for a tiny charity where I am the CEO - which implies a 6 figure salary (if only grin ) We have no kind of employee benefit scheme at all, although I am able to work moderately flexibly, I do 4 days a week which are generally mon-fri but can vary that if needed. My dh works for the police and again, there are very few benefits offered to him. he was allowed a week paternity leave when dd was born 7 years ago, and childcare vouchers when she was at nursery, but apart from that there is really nothing. We are, I guess 'unlucky' to be working in sectors that are targeted for cuts.

ThePskettiIncident Mon 01-Jul-13 15:49:41

I work for a very small company. We get nothing more than the statutory minimum which is frankly awful. I wish there was more incentive for employers to provide better benefits packages and support for staff.

Saying that, they are very flexible about family related absence and try to pay people if off sick on an ad hoc basis. They would never do it for longer term illness though and it's a huge worry as a single parent.

There is only one large employer in the area, so no competition for small businesses to up their game.

Since having children it's become much more important to safe guard my finances. I feel very vulnerable in terms of health and finance, but I can't afford to take out income protection insurance on top of ll the other bills.

Catmint Mon 01-Jul-13 16:52:22

I work for a national charity.

Flexi for caring responsibilities: yes, but balanced against business need.

Good cover for sickness, do you mean contractual sick pay? This used to be 6m full 6m half. Has now been cut to 3m full, I think.

Benefits for part timers: everything that can be pro rata is.

JedwardScissorhands Mon 01-Jul-13 16:56:52

Flexible working

No income protection for illness, but death in service cover.

Part time benefits are the same, obviously payments are pro rata

tanfastic Mon 01-Jul-13 17:04:11

I work for a small law firm. We have no benefits package and are just grateful to have a job now that legal aid is going down the pan.

I have a laid back boss who is family orientated so is fairly flexible. No sick pay or anything of that kind. If I got seriously ill I'd be buggered basically.

MaxinePeakedistrict Mon 01-Jul-13 17:10:22

I'm at home but Dh works for a global co and has a generous benefits package. I've been seriously ill over the last couple of years and he has been able to work from home occasionally, join me for operations and other hospital visits - his boss is very flexible.

We get subsidised private health care but it's still pretty expensive.

His package is generous with regard to his own possible ill-health or if he had to retire early - no complaints there. I think we pay for extra life cover for us both and critical illness cover for him as the main wage earner.

They're pretty good as a whole in trying to take care of their employees but fall down on the overwork and stress angles. A handsome package doesn't compensate for staff cuts leaving remaining staff overloaded.

I'm a self employed storyteller, my work is extremely flexible, but the pay is minimal erratic, we rely on DH's income for household bills.
DH has great employer benefits, 3 months full pay for sickness, then 75% in perpetuity, BUPA provided, flexitime for hospital appointments.
He works from home when necessary, though I do a lot of work from home so the main issue isn't a lack of adults at home, more usually there are too many!
We also have decent savings and a "cushion" of mortgage overpayments we can draw on for a few months in a pinch.

KenDoddsDadsDog Mon 01-Jul-13 18:24:09

I work for a FTSE 100 company.
Very good choice of benefit packages to suit all workers. You can salary sacrifice a lot of them like buying extra holiday , denplan and lots of insurances.
I get free PPP health care and six months full sick pay , six months half.
I'm very lucky - got nothing at my last business, a large American corp.
My hours are pretty flexible but I work a lot of them !

poachedeggs Mon 01-Jul-13 18:25:28

Small business. Very few benefits although informal agreement on sick pay. Otherwise the minimum. As a result I spend a huge amount on personal income protection.

I work part time but as there are no benefits I get the same as everyone else!

manfalou Mon 01-Jul-13 19:11:24

I work (soon to be workED) for a private day nursery as the preschool supervisor, 40 hours a week over 4 days but 42 hours in total as everyone gets half hour for dinner unpaid. We get NO benefits package... NO sick pay... if you're off for a lengthy period of time you basically get pushed out of the place. There is absolutely no flexibility in working hours (which at 7:30am until 6pm) and as a result of this my child went to work with me at 7:15 and didn't get home until 6:20pm. I got NO discount for being a member of staff and taking my child there. Im currently on maternity leave with my 2nd child.. again no maternity package apart from government SMP. I won't be returning.

whattodoo Mon 01-Jul-13 19:13:32

I work part time for a small charity.

Flexible working is available, but no other real employee benefits other than that which are statutorily given.

To be honest, I wouldn't expect anything more from a small charity. Flexible working is the most valuable benefit to me.

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

Bumpstarter Mon 01-Jul-13 19:31:01

~ Does your employer provided benefits package entitle you to flexible working to help make it easier for you to carry out caring responsibilities?

I work for a large national charity. There isn't exactly a benefits package. I think if I die in service my family are paid a lump sum which would probably pay for my funeral.

They have always been as flexible as is operationally possible for me as a parent.

~ Does it entitle you to income protection so that if you become ill you have the best chance of getting better quickly - without having to worry about losing your monthly wage - so as not to impact on your caring responsibilities?

There is sick pay. It lasts for a limited amount of time. I'm not sure what the difference is between income protection and sick pay.

~ Are you entitled to fewer employer provided benefits because you work part time, and does this impact your ability to carry out your caring responsibilities?

I get pro rata holidays, and am not entitled to all bank holidays. This is very annoying, as I do not choose these days off. I use all my holiday entitlement during the school holidays, and then any leftover bank holidays and time off over Xmas when the office is closed is unpaid, or if the manager has got his act together and feeling generous, I have occasionally got discretionary. This means a slight pay cut right at the back end of the year when you can afford it least.

I was ripped off a few years ago over the pension scheme. I joined when I started. Then I was made redundant after 5 years. Then they asked me back 2 months later, but I was not allowed to rejoin the pension scheme. I am well pissed off about this.

FannyFifer Mon 01-Jul-13 19:35:24

I work for a large care company, luckily i am on a permanent part time contract as everyone else is on zero hours contracts, don't get sick pay or any other benefits whatsoever.
Had to fight for my job after maternity leave, involving union etc.

FannyFifer Mon 01-Jul-13 19:35:39

I work for a large care company, luckily i am on a permanent part time contract as everyone else is on zero hours contracts, don't get sick pay or any other benefits whatsoever.
Had to fight for my job after maternity leave, involving union etc.

Bumpstarter Mon 01-Jul-13 19:37:49

Hmm. Do I get paid for dependent sick? I am not sure. I need to check this. My boss told me to put it down as holiday or I wouldn't get paid, but no way am I wasting my precious holiday entitlement on my child's illness!

FannyFifer Mon 01-Jul-13 19:44:12

I work for a large care company, luckily i am on a permanent part time contract as everyone else is on zero hours contracts, don't get sick pay or any other benefits whatsoever.
Had to fight for my job after maternity leave, involving union etc.

EldonAve Mon 01-Jul-13 19:51:20

I work for a small company
I get childcare vouchers but that's the limit of any employee benefits provided

midoriway Mon 01-Jul-13 20:22:03

I would like to know why, 4 months after submitting medical evidence to Unum to make a claim, my DH has heard SFA. PM me for further details Unum marketing folk. Don't worry about putting me in for the prize, we would just like to see our claim paid out.

OrangeKipper Mon 01-Jul-13 20:54:58

For more information still, visit the other Unum pages on MN.

The ones where content isn't controlled by Unum.wink

Even after years of working for large finance and insurance companies we were never offered any employee benefits like this.

The only 'benefit' we got was permanent contracts.

VivaLeBeaver Mon 01-Jul-13 21:19:42

Both me and dh would get six months full pay followed by six months half pay if we were ever off sick.

I wouldn't have a hope in hell of flexible working if I needed it for caring purposes......dh would. If dd is ever off school sick its always been dh who doesn't go into work, his boss will let him work from home at short notice in such circumstances.

We also have some sort of insurance policy that pays out enough to cover the mortgage and then some if either of us were killed, seriously injured or got terminally ill.

TeamEdward Mon 01-Jul-13 21:37:35

I'm currently self-employed so my employe offers diddly-squat in way of benefits! I also work 2 mornings a week as a playworker. No sick pay, maternity, or any other benefits (except the odd pint of leftover milk)

DH however has 3 times death-in-service, 6 months full sick pay and a few other things.

Trills Mon 01-Jul-13 21:53:02

~ Does your employer provided benefits package entitle you to flexible working to help make it easier for you to carry out caring responsibilities?

We have flexible working hours but it's not related to caring responsibilities, everyone can work different hours as long as they get their work done.

~ Does it entitle you to income protection so that if you become ill you have the best chance of getting better quickly - without having to worry about losing your monthly wage - so as not to impact on your caring responsibilities?

This isn't something that I'm aware of. I don't really understand what income protection has to do with "getting better quickly" or "caring responsibilities".

~ Are you entitled to fewer employer provided benefits because you work part time, and does this impact your ability to carry out your caring responsibilities?

I'm not part time so I don't know, but I don't think so.

Trills Mon 01-Jul-13 21:53:20

We do have quite decent sick pay.

I work full time, so the question about part time working doesn't apply. Re the other questions, my employer offers an excellent package. Flexible working, including working from home. They also pay sick pay and if I was unable to work long term, there is an insurance policy to cover my income. I think I'm pretty lucky.

mercibucket Mon 01-Jul-13 22:45:29

i get paid sick leave and a small death in service benefit. i would love private heathcare as a benefit

BlueSkySoftSand Tue 02-Jul-13 02:30:11

I work for a small company with limited benefits. I can take impromptu holidays for family emergencies, but that's about it. It is worrying financially, but not a lot I can do about it currently as it is me who had had to sacrifice career choices so I work locally and the hours to suit collecing DC from nursery and so on.

DoodleAlley Tue 02-Jul-13 05:47:44

I work in local government.

I requested a change in my hours to work part time and can request to work from home within the limits of client need.

In terms of illness there is basic sick pay which becomes slightly more generous with increased duration of service but not earth shatteringly generous in comparison. With the equivalent private sector.

There is no insurance in cases of long term sickness. I would love private healthcare for my family but it's not going to happen!

pussinwellyboots Tue 02-Jul-13 06:09:42

Both DH and I work for the public sector.

For example:
~ Does your employer provided benefits package entitle you to flexible working to help make it easier for you to carry out caring responsibilities?
DH works flexi time and is able to alter his working hours to attend appointments etc where it fits. I work shifts and so have less opportunity to work flexibly but can swap my shifts around if needed.

~ Does it entitle you to income protection so that if you become ill you have the best chance of getting better quickly - without having to worry about losing your monthly wage - so as not to impact on your caring responsibilities?
Both of us are entitled to six months of full pay and six months of half pay if we became ill. As such we have felt that we do not require additional insurance for this.

~ Are you entitled to fewer employer provided benefits because you work part time, and does this impact your ability to carry out your caring responsibilities?
No, employee benefits are the same regardless of hours, but amounts applied pro rata. If needed to take time off because DCs are ill, we would share this between us.

WouldBeHarrietVane Tue 02-Jul-13 06:41:04

I have income protection through work and work flexibly. I have all the benefits I would have if I worked pt.

GetKnitted Tue 02-Jul-13 07:18:32

My -best- only perk is flexitime.but that saves me hundreds of pounds in childcare costs, so v good actually

midoriway Tue 02-Jul-13 09:45:09

Hellooo Unum [waving] I'm still here, waiting to find out why my husband's claim is sitting in someone's in box after 4 months. Trying to figure out ways not to pay it? Surely not!

prakattack Tue 02-Jul-13 10:51:26

I work for a university, and DH for the police. Both of us are entitled to pretty flexible working hours - means we are able to do the school run every morning, which we really appreciate - and DH gets very generous holiday allowance.
We're both entitled to claim childcare vouchers and have decent-ish pension schemes, but that's about it i think.
I agree with previous posters and don't really understand what they mean by income protection. We both get sick pay over and above the statutory minimum but I don't know if this applies to children's illness as well as our own. I think I may need to look that up...!

handcream Tue 02-Jul-13 11:29:36

Work for a big UK FTSE company and have done for a number of yrs. On the face it it the benefits are great. However at middle management level (me!) the pressures are very high. Long hours, responsibility for a team (and their mistakes which apparently you should have spotted having micro managed them!).

Good provision should I die and there is some sick pay (although never used it - others have).

I have private medical insurance which is a taxable perk but very much worth having I feel.

Also, get childcare vouchers but dont need them anymore.

trikken Tue 02-Jul-13 12:07:51

I work at a large retail company.

does your employer provided benefits package entitle you to flexible working to help make it easier for you to carry out caring responsibilities?

Not really. There isnt any way of having flexi time. Your hours have to work for them and you cant change them weekly. (Aside holiday or an emergency.)

~ Does it entitle you to income protection so that if you become ill you have the best chance of getting better quickly - without having to worry about losing your monthly wage - so as not to impact on your caring responsibilities?

No, we have made sure we have our own mortgage protection and life insurances, but work wouldn't cover us on their own.

~ Are you entitled to fewer employer provided benefits because you work part time, and does this impact your ability to carry out your caring responsibilities?

I am entitled to exactly the same benefits working part time as I would full time. Anything extra does help definitely, It means I'm not losing out by doing fewer hours to care at home and get helpful perks I couldnt afford otherwise.

daimbardiva Tue 02-Jul-13 12:29:14

I work for a small charity.

Our benefits are good I think - 3 months full pay, 3 months half pay then up to 6 more statutory mat leave. 3 weeks full for pat. leave

Pension is good - employer contributes 12.5%

Extremely accomodating re flexible working - both in terms of part-time etc. and varying hours as needed

sick pay up to 3 months per year.

Don't get paid if dependent sick though - has to come off AL

AnnMumsnet (MNHQ) Tue 02-Jul-13 14:09:05

midoriway - I have pm-ed you. Apologies I was in a meeting this am.

Weegiemum Tue 02-Jul-13 14:35:44

I work for a very small charity, at very small wages. I get stat sick pay (and would get maternity though that's never going to happen again!) but not much else. I work for them out of principle, rather than for what it brings in, though. They were incredibly flexible 18 months ago when I developed a disability and provided a great return-to-work package.

Dh is a GP and therefore technically self-employed. Pay is very good (he's a single handed principal) but flexibility depends a lot on locum availability.

Arcticwaffle Tue 02-Jul-13 15:12:49

I work for a university. No income protection packages, but good working conditions generally. Flexible working policies available - they ruin your career prospects hmm but apart from that minor drawback they're good and easily available to part and full time workers. 6 months fully paid sick leave (and I think 6 months on half pay).

I work for a small business (12 people). Salary is very competitive, hours are very flexible and I have been part time from the start. There is never a problem getting time off to look after sick children etc, I return the favour by always making the hours back up and try and make up any I lose through my own illness too, although that is not required. Sick pay (is that what is meant by income protection in this case?) is full pay by informal agreement, long term would be negotiable I guess.

We have no death in service, but we have a pension into which the employer pays.

I wasn't there when I had my maternity leaves, but a colleague has been treated very favourably (in terms of flexibility due to illness in pregnancy, coming back to work etc, not sure about pay).

I work for a medium sized financial services company and get a decent package

Full pay for 26 weeks if off sick
Income protection of 50% of salary from 26 weeks to 2 years
Death in Service benefit of 8 times salary
Private medical cover
A free employee assistance programme which includes second opinions, legal assistance, counselling etc

I am not worried about our finances from my point of view (I am the main earner) but DH has recently given up his job and become self employed so he gets nothing if he is off sick, on holiday etc.

In terms of flexibility, I am at a level in the company now where although I work full time it is very flexible. I can do the school run most mornings and collect from school 2 or 3 times a week. I do however then end up working when the boys are in bed/on an evening. I can also work from home if they are ill. I think this only works however as I am equally flexible and end up working very long days (and nights!), weekends etc if I need to.

Doobydoo Tue 02-Jul-13 19:41:59

nO THEY ARE NOT

QOD Tue 02-Jul-13 22:00:37

Yes yes and yes

Can I have the voucher? grin

sharond101 Tue 02-Jul-13 22:17:06

~ Does your employer provided benefits package entitle you to flexible working to help make it easier for you to carry out caring responsibilities?
I cannot work flexibly as my job requires me to fulfill hours stipulated in a contract between my company and the public sector. I can however request a change in my working hours should I require them.
~ Does it entitle you to income protection so that if you become ill you have the best chance of getting better quickly - without having to worry about losing your monthly wage - so as not to impact on your caring responsibilities? no income protection offered
~ Are you entitled to fewer employer provided benefits because you work part time, and does this impact your ability to carry out your caring responsibilities? there is no difference to my benefits working part time just that everything is pro rata.

GeekInThePink Tue 02-Jul-13 22:22:39

I'm with a good employer I think.
I asked for flexitime and got it on the days I wanted
I have a good amount of holiday
I have a good amount of sick days
They are reasonably family friendly.

GeekInThePink Tue 02-Jul-13 22:22:55

Sorry it's a large organisation.

GeekInThePink Tue 02-Jul-13 22:23:25

Everything is pro rata when part time

skaen Wed 03-Jul-13 06:31:06

I work for a large organisation. Parents can apply for flexible working but in practice anyone can work part time or from home subject to operational requirements. I also get childcare vouchers, decent pension and up to 6 months full pay for sickness and maternity leave. Also s generous holiday allowance.

DH works for a city law firm. They are much more flexible about home working and part time within limits - 4 days seems usually fine. He gets 3 months full pay if sick plus another 6 months half pay together with critical illness and injury cover and a huge death in service benefit.

It is invaluable for us. DH has a chronic illness so we'd struggle to get any benefits approaching this privately.

Triumphoveradversity Wed 03-Jul-13 07:07:43

Full pay for sickness is 26 weeks. Half pay a further 26 weeks

Flexibility can be requested but no guarantees, true flexibility is enjoyed by management.

Five days emergency leave per year for any caring duties, e.g my line manager had two days off to care for her DH who had an op. so not just for dc.

Career average pension scheme, used to be final salary but was 'amended' about ten years ago. People were incentivised by being given a bonus linked to salary. Average payout was probably 1k. People were very short sighted.

There is a union where I work.

Triumphoveradversity Wed 03-Jul-13 07:09:25

Just to add, same conditions for part time workers

PearlyWhites Wed 03-Jul-13 09:12:18

My dh works in the civil service he has good sickness benefits and life/ critical illness cover.

AllSWornOut Wed 03-Jul-13 20:49:14

I work for a large multinational. Benefits are different in each country but where I work:
1. Not really officially flexi-time, but generally people work hours that sit them (does depend on manager though).
2. Very restricted tele-working protocol is currently being trialled (restricted in the departments being considered) but again, depending on manager it's often possible to work the odd day from home.
3. Company tops up sick pay to full wage for first 3 months.
4. We can purchase childcare vouchers at a discount.
5. Maternity leave is stat only. 3 supplemental days of paternity leave given.
6. Flexible time savings accounts and the right to sabbaticals and unpaid leave help to make up for the lack in #5.
7. 5 days leave to look after sick children, can roll over to up to 15 days after 3 years.
8. Company subsidy for private health insurance.
9. Reasonable pension, share purchase and other saving schemes.

Overall I guess it's pretty good but the inflexibility over tele-working is frustrating.

Iamaslummymummy Wed 03-Jul-13 21:44:54

I am employed full time by one of the big banks

I was able to change my hours to 8-4 to care for my son.

I've been on long term sick for work for 2.8 years. 6 months full pay then 2 years half pay through an income protection policy. Now nothing waiting to see if I'll health retirement is granted.

Sounds identical to 2gorgeousboys actually. Reasonable annual leave, good death in service, part time workers are treated the same.

Elainey1609 Wed 03-Jul-13 22:59:38

No income protection scheme to be honest that I know of , but sick pay is full pay for 5 months, then it is deducted.

I don't get sick pay if a dependent is sick .....I am told to take that as holiday.
But do have a small child care voucher scheme

Special leave and shift changes can be arranged with HR if it is possible

CharlotteBronteSaurus Thu 04-Jul-13 09:17:49

i work for a local authority, seconded across to the NHS
we have flexible working - as long as I get my work done, no-one appears to mind how I arrange my working day, which is great
we have the option to work from home, although some of my childcare is home-based so this isn't something I do
we get childcare vouchers
my personal sick pay package is very generous (6mo full pay, 6mo half), although this partially reflects my long service

we get some entitlement to paid carers leave, but the policy on this has changed and we are now Strongly Encouraged to use annual leave or flexi if this is available.

the flexible working is the thing that makes it possible for both DH and I to go out to work - generally one or other of us can finish early or go in late if need be.

ShatnersBassoon Thu 04-Jul-13 09:47:21

DH works for a large American company. He is entitled to apply for flexible hours to cover care needs, and he is entitled to enhanced sick pay. There's also paid leave for emergency care situations such as if I was hospitalised and DH had to be here for the children.

I had the exact same benefits when I worked for a large British company, although at the time I wasn't a parent so never had to worry about care cover, but it was nice to think I wouldn't be left vulnerable should the unexpected happen in the future.

We feel confident that DH's employer would support him through anything such as sickness or a family emergency.

Howstricks Thu 04-Jul-13 12:02:09

We run our own business and have found costs so high and profit margins so tight that we honestly cannot afford any additional employee schemes and the same goes for us. There really isn't any safety net.

HeadFairy Thu 04-Jul-13 14:34:02

I work in an industry which is publicly funded and has been a high profile target of cuts... we are a 24/7 organisation, we are all expected to work erratically, with no predictable shift pattern across many different shifts.

We are currently fighting cuts which will mean an end to flexible working practices (and will massively discriminate against anyone with caring responsibilities).

Good maternity package (which I don't expect will last much longer) 18 weeks full pay then SMP for the remainder.

Sick pay is full pay for 26 weeks after 2 years of full time employment.

I'm not sure if benefits are pro rata'd... I'm on 90% (I work 90% of the full time hours) so I get pretty much the same as the full timers.

We do have a lot of annual leave to reflect the fact that we work every public holiday, weekends are usual work days etc.

Dh works for a large American bank, he has a really good benefits package that allows him to choose a selection of benefits up to a certain amount. We have healthcare and dental care for all the family from them, plus travel insurance and as dh has recently been promoted and his benefits package has increased we now receive shopping vouchers too to make up the extra allowance.

iwantavuvezela Thu 04-Jul-13 15:33:39

For example:
~ Does your employer provided benefits package entitle you to flexible working to help make it easier for you to carry out caring responsibilities?

We are allowed to apply for flexible working, I am in an educational institution, and if they can this is done. However some courses need to be taught at certain times etc, so this is not always possible. However I did ask for flexible working for myself, and after a bit of tooing and froing we came up with a compromise which helps me to fetch my daughter from school a few days a week.

~ Does it entitle you to income protection so that if you become ill you have the best chance of getting better quickly - without having to worry about losing your monthly wage - so as not to impact on your caring responsibilities?

I am not sure about income protectionk, but I would be entitled to sick leave if I was sick, and I would be paid for this (within set time limits)

~ Are you entitled to fewer employer provided benefits because you work part time, and does this impact your ability to carry out your caring responsibilities?

Although I work part-time (0.6 which has now gone to a 0.8 contract) I have been able to join the work pension scheme to which my company pays a percentage into; I have been able (when my daughter was at nursery) to apply for childcare vouchers; I have been able to join a medical scheme at quite reduced rates for myself, partner and child which offers some good benefits that i have been very happ with. I had maternity leave with some benefits, get paid leave (6 weeks); so all in I am very happy with the type of benefits and contract that i have.

carabossse Thu 04-Jul-13 16:29:44

Private sector worker here. I think the main issue is that it feels like employees are less likely to have employment security - due to things outside the employee's direct control e.g. globalisation, redundancies due to changes in corporate strategy etc. So relying on your employer is fine when things are going well but if you lose your job, your safety net (life assurance, critical illness etc ) can disappear too .

Making use of opportunities for flexible hours and working from home helps. In my industry though there's a lot of unnecessary business travel - not for client meetings, just internal meetings that could be handled in other ways without meeting face to face.

Charlene1 Thu 04-Jul-13 20:17:46

I would love to work from home or flexiwork, but I'm not allowed in my job. sad Managers and sales reps can though. Pension is good though as you get free life insurance worth 3.5 times salary for death in service, and you get 5 fully paid sick days a year. No income protection though.

nerysw Thu 04-Jul-13 21:21:12

I work for a council and get benefits such as flexi-time, the chance to go part time after having children and childcare vouchers.

zipzap Thu 04-Jul-13 21:22:20

I do bits and bobs of freelance work which means that we tend to look at it as a bit of a bonus these days rather than income we need to rely on and it therefore has zero benefits attached. Once the children are older I'm hoping to get back into work although I suspect the benefits (notably pension) will be lots worse than they were when I left a few years ago.

DH works for a large multinational and can choose from assorted benefits including buying back some extra holiday, extra pension contributions, family health and dental plans and critical illness. Some stuff comes automatically not sure where the exact line lies between what everyone gets, what is dependent on his grade and which are the extras he chooses (or doesn't). I just know that he does buy back some extra holiday each year which is great.

And while he doesn't work flexibly per se, he does work from home and often ends up having work meetings at weird times of the day and night as he works on teams that have members in the US, China and India amongst other places. So he is able to work a bit flexibly unofficially in lieu - one week he might have some late night meetings that don't start until 11pm so he doesn't feel too bad about starting at 10am one day the next week in order to go to a parent's assembly to watch the dc say.

littlemonkeychops Thu 04-Jul-13 21:29:59

I work for a medium-large private company.

I work part time but was very lucky to get it agreed, the culture is to not really allow it. I don't think i get less benefits for being part time (illegal surely?!).

I have private healthcare and death in service cover for 3x my salary.

No idea what sick pay or longterm sick benefits i would be entitled to.

CheeryCherry Thu 04-Jul-13 22:30:57

Yes I am allowed to work part time, for which I am very grateful. I do get 6 months sick pay after being there 2 years, then 6 months half pay.But I get no additional benefits, no income protection, and a very poor pension. Good thing I like my job!

Snog Fri 05-Jul-13 19:06:33

~ Does your employer provided benefits package entitle you to flexible working to help make it easier for you to carry out caring responsibilities? No
~ Does it entitle you to income protection so that if you become ill you have the best chance of getting better quickly - without having to worry about losing your monthly wage - so as not to impact on your caring responsibilities? For a limited time I would get full salary, then half salary, then nothing - but could potentially b
~ Are you entitled to fewer employer provided benefits because you work part time, and does this impact your ability to carry out your caring responsibilities? no

I'm going to answer twice - once for my old career and again for my new one.

Old career: utility industry

~ Does your employer provided benefits package entitle you to flexible working to help make it easier for you to carry out caring responsibilities?
Technically yes, but many women who did go part-time later lost out in restructurings. Senior management took a dim view of it. Sexist, yes!

~ Does it entitle you to income protection so that if you become ill you have the best chance of getting better quickly - without having to worry about losing your monthly wage - so as not to impact on your caring responsibilities?
There was a generous sick pay scheme (six months full-pay, six months half-pay).

~ Are you entitled to fewer employer provided benefits because you work part time, and does this impact your ability to carry out your caring responsibilities?
All financial benefits were pro-rata for part-time folks. All else was exactly the same.

New career: teacher!

~ Does your employer provided benefits package entitle you to flexible working to help make it easier for you to carry out caring responsibilities?
Not as such. There are many part-time teachers, but daily teaching hours are not flexible and the hours are long.

~ Does it entitle you to income protection so that if you become ill you have the best chance of getting better quickly - without having to worry about losing your monthly wage - so as not to impact on your caring responsibilities?
No - standard statutory sick pay.

~ Are you entitled to fewer employer provided benefits because you work part time, and does this impact your ability to carry out your caring responsibilities?
What benefits?! There are no 'employer-provided benefits' beyond the pension scheme.

janekirk Fri 05-Jul-13 23:08:58

Have a choice of working hours but I can't change them too often. Employer is very understanding when it comes to things such as the kids falling ill. Good sick pay scheme and retirement benefits as long as I pay in to the scheme.

PutThatDownNow Fri 05-Jul-13 23:10:50

Public sector. Flexible working which made such a difference when DC were small. Childcare vouchers. Good sick pay and maternity pay and pension. At the moment.

Blu Fri 05-Jul-13 23:31:01

I work for a well established grant-funded not-for- profit orhanisation that is a regd, charity.

Does your employer provided benefits package entitle you to flexible working to help make it easier for you to carry out caring responsibilities?

Not a beneifit package, but flexible working to a very flexibe degree. But that is the nature of the work anyway. I have a hige amount of freeedom in m working hours, but obligations to work lots of evenings and weekends. But I am able to make it work very well for me.

~ Does it entitle you to income protection so that if you become ill you have the best chance of getting better quickly - without having to worry about losing your monthly wage - so as not to impact on your caring responsibilities?

No, not at all. No perks of that nature.

~ Are you entitled to fewer employer provided benefits because you work part time, and does this impact your ability to carry out your caring responsibilities?

I don't work part time, but p/t employees in my organisation are entitled to the same conditions as anyone else. But there are no benefits! No employers contribution to pension, and statutory minimum for everything.

Low salary, in relation to seniority, years of experience and budget and responsibility managed, but that's the nature of the work.

Blu Fri 05-Jul-13 23:32:32

We do do childcare vouchers. Very useful. But we didn't use a scheme - the company just pays a portion of the nursery fees direct. It cuts out the expense of the actual vouchers as managed by a voucher provider.

stephgr Sat 06-Jul-13 02:11:28

I work for a small firm with no benefits except death in service and childcare vouchers. Flexible working would be great and income protection would be good too.

Self-employed
I have only what I provide/arrange for myself in terms of holiday pay, sick pay, pension and income protection! I can work as flexibly as I like though -as long as I put the hours in!

Oblomov Sat 06-Jul-13 15:11:32

Sick pay at Directors discretion. No pension, yet .
Income protection? I can't even get it for dh, privately, because he hasn't been on his position for 2 years yet. Nightmare.

Smudging Sun 07-Jul-13 08:08:49

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

Happiestinwellybobs Sun 07-Jul-13 20:38:33

Does your employer provided benefits package entitle you to flexible working to help make it easier for you to carry out caring responsibilities?

I work for a smallish not for profit company. Most employees have flexi hours, and many access their right to apply for flexible working. So I work part time to suit my lifestyle and so allow me to spend time with my child.

Does it entitle you to income protection so that if you become ill you have the best chance of getting better quickly - without having to worry about losing your monthly wage - so as not to impact on your caring responsibilities?

I'm entitled to six months full pay and six months half pay for sick leave. They also give us a cash back scheme to access things like physio etc.
Plus they offer OH and counselling services.

Are you entitled to fewer employer provided benefits because you work part time, and does this impact your ability to carry out your caring responsibilities?

No. Only my holidays are pro rated. I still get every other benefit that full time employees get, for example child care vouchers, a good maternity/adoption leave package.

Meglet Sun 07-Jul-13 21:37:29

I work for a medium sized company.

No flexi time despite no need for me to be at my desk at a certain time, not needed for phone calls or meetings (unless planned a few days ahead). I'm gearing myself up to go into battle with them about it as the rigid hours get in the way of looking after the children (I'm a LP).

I do get sick pay, think it's 3 months full pay.

They have recently said they were going to stop random days of unpaid leave, which I have used a couple of times when the kids were sick. I asked about this but apparently it's too much faff for HR to do the paperwork for odd days leave hmm angry. They do seem to go out of their way to make it family un-friendly.

daisybrown Sun 07-Jul-13 23:07:00

Work for a local authority so I have nothing to complain about benefit wise. Never be afraid to raise your voice if something seems unfair.

Namechanger012345 Mon 08-Jul-13 04:04:02

My employer is one which when I took the job I assumed would be very good for benefits (large international employer in the City). They do offer a good maternity package however unfortunately I got pregnant when I had not been working there long enough to benefit from it! They do childcare vouchers, fairly decent pension... Flexible working hours are in theory possible but in reality very likely to be difficult, although to be fair I haven't actually had to request anything so can't say for sure how they would handle a request for that.

LimitedEditionLady Mon 08-Jul-13 12:39:31

I work for a british growing retailer.They do have a small benefits scheme but they dont tell us what they are?There is no information there to tell us what they are.We can pay for a health insurance scheme,but again they havent formally told us and there is noone to ask to be honest.There is a poster for childcare vouchers which has disappeared so noone uses this.We dont get sick pay,if you dont go in you dont get paid.You cant use your holidays as sick days(well this is what that they say)We get a lot of stick for asking to be flexible with hours even though Id say around 50% of us have school age and under children.People have been told if they cant work the hours they shall be worked out of the company in the past.So in effect if I van't do the hours because Im the main carer I have the worry I will lose my job.

I work for the LA, DH works for a large company with a good union/benefits package. We are very lucky to be well covered. I think we may be in a minority though.

sealight123 Tue 09-Jul-13 21:42:45

I work at the the University of Leeds and it has great benefits that allow me to be a employee and a mum. Not only do I have allocated sick days and compassionate leave (touch wood I never need either to be used) I also get carers leave days, specifically for when I have emergencies with my daughter and need to care for my daughter. One example is when we were over run with snow this year, my daughters nursery had to close for the day so I used a carers leave day to look after my daughter as no other childcare was available. They also give the choice of having childcare vouchers but I found working tax credits a better solution for my family. My workplace is full of families, mums, dads, grandparents, which makes them understanding when it comes to balancing work and home. Amazing job, amazing people. smile

AnnMumsnet (MNHQ) Wed 10-Jul-13 14:15:41

Thanks for all the comments.
Pleased to say iwantavuvezela has been selected as the winner of the £100 giftcard. Well done.

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