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Would you show this video to your child? Watch a short film about some of the dangers teenagers may face if they run away from home and tell us what you think. £2 donation from Aviva to Railway Children for every watch/ comment

(110 Posts)
AnnMumsnet (MNHQ) Wed 10-Apr-13 09:44:41

Railway Children have shared this video which illustrates a shocking story of what can happen to a teenager if they run away & spend time alone on UK streets. Many do make it back home safely but some end up in very different situations, forced to take huge risks in order to survive.

As part of our campaign with charity Railway Children & Aviva - to raise awareness of the fact that one child is estimated to run away from home every five minutes in the UK - we'd like as many MNers as possible to watch the video then post what you think of it on this thread:

~ Would you share it with your teenage DC (if you have one/will have one soon!)?
~ Would you use it as a conversation starter about the topic of running away from home?
~ This has been classified as Cert 15 for cinema use, do you agree? At what age do you think it would be appropriate for children to see it?
~ Do you think the video should be shown at school?

For every view of the video and for every comment* Aviva will donate £2 to Railway Children.

Here's the film



Sadly, having a child run away from home is much more common that you think. It is estimated that one child runs away from home or care in the UK every five minutes - that amounts to 100,000 each year. Railway Children exists to not only help provide safety and support for these children but also to help educate young people on the risks and alternatives to running away from home, to prevent more from doing so.

If you would like to sign up to receive more information from Railway Children, you can do that here and this too will trigger an additional donation from Aviva.

If you've got any questions, please feel free to ask.

Thanks,
MNHQ

*At least 90 seconds.

Mrsrobertduvall Wed 10-Apr-13 09:48:34

Unfortunately it won't load on my Ipad.
However...imo no film can be too graphic to show teenagers about dangers. They often live in a bubble of invincibility, and need a shock to make them realise the possibilities of what can happen to them.
Will try to view on computer.

CuppaTea83 Wed 10-Apr-13 11:27:16

My eldest is 9 so not quite the age bracket yet.

But I would allow a teenaged child to watch this and think it would be fine to show this in schools.
I think Cert 15 in the cinema is probably right though, as the cinema age rating below that is 12 which I feel, especially if they are not with their parents would be too young. They may be confused or slightly alarmed by the content (although not explicit) and have no adult to ask questions to.

Tee2072 Wed 10-Apr-13 11:45:59

My son, at 3, is way too young to be shown this or any other video about this, but if he was old enough? I'd show it to him.

Except, it's about a girl. What happens to boys on the street? Is it the same?

I know it probably is, but something Aviva/Railway Children might want to think about. Boys probably think even less about parts of running away, i.e. the prostitution part, than girls do.

And if it wasn't for my parents? That could have been me. But my parents welcomed me home when I ran away, with open arms and no censure and help.

May all runaways get the same...

Empress77 Wed 10-Apr-13 11:49:02

I think its a good conversation starter to broach the topic - and would probably show it to my (future) teenager -but not sure if id want them to see it without further discussion - eg at the cinema. Wording showing statistics might make it work without discussion perhaps? & to have advice on where to go for help etc. School might be an ok place but would need the right discussion as the girl starts off having an ok time. I would want to make my child think further about what the film shows - such as talking it through with her- 'why do you think the girl here is having to do do this?' and 'how do you think she feels about it?' etc, rather than just seeing it at the cinema?

mymonkey Wed 10-Apr-13 11:58:11

I will use this to start a conversation with DS13. It's heartbreaking but the more help we get to talk about difficult issues and potentially dangerous behaviour the better.

I think this should definitely be shown in schools from year 8 (12+) and not just to girls, it applies equally to boys who might run away or could have a friend who is thinking about it.

Mrsrobertduvall is right - teens are exposed to so much (more than we think, don't kid yourself) any informational film needs to be shocking to stand out. However also agree with CuppaTea83 that it might be best for under 15s to have an adult to talk to (if they want to) so 15 certificate would be right for cinema release but set the bar younger for schools.

snowballinashoebox Wed 10-Apr-13 12:38:08

Very powerful. My ds is is 12 in a few months and I will be showing him this video. Agree that it for under 15s there needs to be careful discussion.
kids are sponges I am sure my ds knows far more about such things than I might think.

nailak Wed 10-Apr-13 14:29:31

I don't think it would have put me off running away at that age. I don't think it is gritty enough. Also because it is not true it looses credibility. What I mean by that is that the vast majority of women who go to squat parties are not heroin addicts or prostitutes! plenty of women who attend these sort of events have jobs and are not homeless.

Maybe my experience of living in squats is just very different from what is portrayed in the video. The hardest drug that was taken was ketamine. (not by me).

Also girls with zero self esteem and confidence, who dont feel loved and belonging at home, who feel like no one cares for them etc and want to run away and are looking for acceptance already in the wrong places. I don't actually think the thought of prostitution is going to put them off running away. IME what really needs to happen is a way of increasing self esteem.

BeQuicksieorBeDead Wed 10-Apr-13 15:11:36

This is a tricky one, I think I would definitely show it to teenagers and running away from home is something I have talked to my Year 6 classes about... Not about prostitution, but about being vulnerable and finding other ways to sort things out.

I would say that of the children I have met that have been most at risk of these sort of experiences, sadly this film would make little difference to their choices. What they are facing at home or within themselves is worse than the perceived threats of the street, and they tend to know what the risks are already.I agree with nailak that what is needed is to boost self esteem in these children so that they believe they are worth more than these poor outcomes.

DwellsUndertheSink Wed 10-Apr-13 15:33:57

I would say that part of it was good, but maybe not harsh enough?

Liked the bit where she puts out her hand to beg. Also the smile with her braces....

Thought she looked like she was having a great time at the squat party - that would almost encourage?

The drug running and taking was gritty (but her blissful face after taking the drugs....again, glamourising a bit?) , and the prostitution.....well, Id like to think that the lasses going down that route would be scared and somewhat reluctant, not holding their head up high and strutting....

To me, the actress was a bit one dimensional - a bit Kirsten Stewart in her lack of facial expression.

Anyway, to the questions:

~ Would you share it with your teenage DC (if you have one/will have one soon!)? Yes
~ Would you use it as a conversation starter about the topic of running away from home? Yes. Id like a boy version too!
~ This has been classified as Cert 15 for cinema use, do you agree? At what age do you think it would be appropriate for children to see it? (*Yes, 15 is about right*
~ Do you think the video should be shown at school? Yes, to Y10/11s

Hulababy Wed 10-Apr-13 15:39:56

~ Would you share it with your teenage DC (if you have one/will have one soon!)?

My DD is only just 11y so too young; but when she was older and we were discussing such a topic I would be prepared to show the video and discuss it.

~ Would you use it as a conversation starter about the topic of running away from home?

As above

~ This has been classified as Cert 15 for cinema use, do you agree? At what age do you think it would be appropriate for children to see it?

I can see why it would be for a 15 film, as I think it explores topics that younger teens may need discussing. A 12 cert would be harder, as a 12 film allows children younger than 12, but with an adult in. I think it would be suitable for any teens to see, but in context.

~ Do you think the video should be shown at school?

Yes, it would work well as part of the PHSE topic for teens of any age.
I'd like to see one featuring a teenage boy too.

i don't think much of this tbh. i get the hint at prostitution at the end but i don't think it hits hard enough to get it across and the she's grinning doing the drugs and at the party so???

i don't think it hits hard enough or really represents the real dangers. teens are not going to be shocked and horrified at this or scared tbh. so she goes to a squat party and she smokes heroine once...?? i think it looks like,, so? and? from their perspective.

without having to be graphic or even show drug usage it could have been a lot more realistic and offputting. as it is there is an air of glamour to the whole thing i'm afraid.

i say this as someone who works in FE and writes and delivers tutorials and used to be in secondary education. i can't see teens being that fussed by this.

presumably the girl giving her chips and taking her to a party was supposed to be 'grooming' but it isn't clear enough for young viewers imo and instead kind of looks like ah look you get looked after and there's a 'scene' out there.

yeah and to be honest reflecting on this, and the work i've done with teens recently using video clips and discussion, they wouldn't decode this and would struggle to pull out what was being said. we tend to think teens are really sophisticated at video and visual images and messages but it hasn't been my experience in the classroom.

as for my own children if i had teens - no i wouldn't use this. i could think of better ways of bringing the issues in that didn't look so harmless and glam. i'd be more inclined to use real young people's accounts of things that happened to them than a glossy music vid looking clip.

actually i think for the people it presumably targets this is potentially more harm than good - it gives the impression of a community to go into which compared to their home lives might look quite appealing.

HeathRobinson Wed 10-Apr-13 16:25:50

I think it's too slick, music overlay etc. And not nearly grim enough.

JamieandtheMagicTorch Wed 10-Apr-13 16:56:26

I think it is gritty but not gritty enough. The music is great (to my 43 year old ears), which makes it appealing to watch, but as others have said, the bit at the squat is almost too much fun, and the point about prostitution isn't strong enough, and is lost.

JamieandtheMagicTorch Wed 10-Apr-13 17:02:26

Maybe this is beside the point, but I'm thinking about an episode of Silent Witness where unhappy teenage girls were groomed by a group of men, abused and lead into prostitution I mention it because it portrayed very well, very believably, how supposedly savvy teens could be sucked into a dreadful lifestyle.

DisorganisednotDysfunctional Wed 10-Apr-13 17:16:34

No objections to it being shown to teenagers, but I don't know how useful it would be.

The bit about the chips & the party weren't graphic enough. I assume it was meant to show grooming, but it was far too much like normal life, and the kids were all roughly the same age. Girls like boys watching them dance. And aren't kids who run away the ones who feel uncared for at home? Pushed out by new stepfathers... Insecure. Her appearance suggests she's very much loved. Someone paid for those braces.

Being chatted to or offered food by another teen and asked to a squat party isn't intrinsically sinister or off-putting. Happens a lot to ordinary teenagers. My older DS has been to several squat parties and a friend of mine (a fellow poet) lived in a huge London squat for years. It was fun at that age and a lot of teenagers wouldn't see squats as a place of inevitable danger.

The smoking heroin bit was far too glamorous. She looked totally blissed out. Bit of an advert for the joys, perhaps?

The main problem for me was that it wasn't grim enough -- I'm guessing it was showing grooming, drug addiction and prostitution but it wasn't explicit enough and, tbh, I couldn't work out why the squat lead to the prostitution. She doesn't look ill enough or miserable enough at the end. If I were a cocky little teenager I'd just brush it all off, I think.

I guess you've done loads of market research. Maybe it works better if there's a lot of discussion around it. Show the film, spend several sessions on aspects of it. On its own it's not very persuasive.

Empress77 Wed 10-Apr-13 17:22:44

I agree its not gritty enough and the partying & drugs could do with looking less fun - its kind of not until the end when its really not nice for the girl? Also wonder that perhaps the horrors at home could be way worse than the lifestyle shown since she has run away.

DisorganisednotDysfunctional Wed 10-Apr-13 17:24:32

Oops, sorry. didn't answer questions

~ Would you share it with your teenage DC (if you have one/will have one soon!)?

No. I have 2. They'd be bored. Not relevant to them or their mates. We have problems, but not those.

~ Would you use it as a conversation starter about the topic of running away from home?

No. Not v helpful to boys.

~ This has been classified as Cert 15 for cinema use, do you agree? At what age do you think it would be appropriate for children to see it?

15 is fine, though it's suitable for any secondary school child. But I'm not convinced it would be effective. It needs to be more gritty, with the messages far more clearly portrayed.

~ Do you think the video should be shown at school?

Maybe. There'd need to be a lot of discussion round it, to ensure the kids understood the points being made. The film is "coded" -- not explicit. Would they all understand that the chips business is supposed to be grooming? Is being offered chips convincing as grooming? I would say not.

RatherBeOnThePiste Wed 10-Apr-13 17:41:20

Will do. Mine are 15 and 13. Back in a bit.

chimchar Wed 10-Apr-13 17:49:42

I work with teens, and have worked with homeless young people too.

I don't think it was gritty enough at all....the girls appearance didn't deteriorate nearly enough. She still looked clean and well groomed at the end of the film which suggested to me that this was only a short term thing...not a long term problem.

The issues addressed only hinted at the real deal...if teens watching didn't know how drugs were couriered then she may have been posting a parcel for the guy?!

The girl who gave her chips looked like she was rescuing her and took her in.

The guy at the "party" who was trying it on with her was held back from her by one of his mates...again, nothing too nasty there.

If you were naive then you also may not get the prostitution thing. If she had been thrown in kicking and screaming, or off her face, it would have been far more obvious that she was doing it because she had to and not wanted to.

I dunno....

I feel bad being critical, but teens think they are invincible....it needs to be real. It would have been better with real life footage, and real life stories, and totally agree about a boys version. I was quite excited at the start because I thought it was going to be gender neutral and let us see the story through the eyes of the runaway. I liked the way it was filmed at the start....people looking etc..

I only watched it the once, but don't recall any helplines or advice websites being shown.

I is something I would share with my kids, and something that I would use as a tool to use in a discussion with the teens I work with, but it would need a fair amount of narration to point out the issues maybe.

MuchBrighterNow Wed 10-Apr-13 17:52:57

IMO The party and drug taking glamorise belonging to an alternative scene. The hint of prostitution at the end is not strong enough. I'd say its too tame to put anyone off running away.

MuchBrighterNow Wed 10-Apr-13 17:54:53

IMO The party and drug taking glamorise belonging to an alternative scene. The hint of prostitution at the end is not strong enough. I'd say its too tame to put anyone off running away.

quail Wed 10-Apr-13 18:25:06

Ohh, just made me a bit tears. My kids are too young to get it, but I will be showing them EVERYTHING including the Grange Hill Just Say No video when they get into double figures.

LineRunner Wed 10-Apr-13 18:28:30

I agree that there needs to be a story about a boy as well as a girl, involving prostitution. The prostitution has to be shown as dangerous not just a bit 'ugh'.

Yes I would watch it with my teenagers; from age 12; and the current film is fine for school - but as I said, there needs to be a boy's narrative as well.

And something to give hope about returning either home or to a different place.

Wonderful music - well chosen. Wonderful campaign. Thank you, AnnMN.

trice Wed 10-Apr-13 18:44:57

I am not convinced about the efficacy of these scary public education films. I would be more impressed by a film showing the escape options for teens who are pushed to extremes. Sometimes staying at home is worse.

DisorganisednotDysfunctional Wed 10-Apr-13 18:54:31

I would be more impressed by a film showing the escape options for teens who are pushed to extremes. Sometimes staying at home is worse.

What a brilliant idea, Trice! Make a film showing how a teenager with a vile home life escapes -- safely. Outline strategies for getting away from intolerable situations.

Who can you contact? What about housing? Who might help. That sort of thing. Of course, you might find that the options are very few indeed, given the current climate. sad

Even prostitution is probably better than being raped by your stepfather. And if you're young and pretty it doesn't have to be anything like as grim as on the film.

I also agree with you about scary public education films. They do tend to arouse ridicule.

Madlizzy Wed 10-Apr-13 18:58:24

I agree that it's not gritty enough. I went to parties like that and the hardest thing I took was alcohol and that was whilst I was living at home. The prostitution bit was unrealistic - she looked wholly too cool and calm, rather than drugged and coerced. My kids would watch it and say "Duh, that's a no brainer". I don't think it will persuade any child to stay home really, and the majority of kids who do abscond are in unsafe, unhappy homes or are supposedly looked after kids.

Madlizzy Wed 10-Apr-13 18:59:27

Oh, and I'd be happy with a 12 certificate on that too. Kids that age are surprisingly knowledgeable about the world.

MissTweed Wed 10-Apr-13 19:41:11

I got a chicken breast out of the freezer this morning to defrost and forgot about it. It's been sat on my window sill ever since.... Do you think it is safe to cook up or not take the risk and just feed to to my DH instead?

MissTweed Wed 10-Apr-13 19:41:40

Sorry wrong thread blush

LineRunner Wed 10-Apr-13 19:43:02

grin

grin fantastic misstweed

firawla Wed 10-Apr-13 20:17:11

most children who run away, isn't it because they have a shit life already so i don't think a video like this will make a difference?? agree with trice

cory Wed 10-Apr-13 20:37:54

"trice Wed 10-Apr-13 18:44:57
I am not convinced about the efficacy of these scary public education films. I would be more impressed by a film showing the escape options for teens who are pushed to extremes. Sometimes staying at home is worse."

"DisorganisednotDysfunctional Wed 10-Apr-13 18:54:31
I would be more impressed by a film showing the escape options for teens who are pushed to extremes. Sometimes staying at home is worse.

What a brilliant idea, Trice! Make a film showing how a teenager with a vile home life escapes -- safely. Outline strategies for getting away from intolerable situations.

Who can you contact? What about housing? Who might help. That sort of thing. Of course, you might find that the options are very few indeed, given the current climate.

Even prostitution is probably better than being raped by your stepfather."

This.

Also a film that shows how you avoid being born into a family that will throw you out onto the streets as soon as you grow into a teen. Going on information provided by such charities as Centrepoint, teens who live rough have not necessarily had much of a choice in the matter.

freakydeaky Wed 10-Apr-13 21:16:59

Have just watched this with DS (14). He thought it was ok, but not gritty enough to actually put anybody off running away.
As others have pointed out, it was a bit 'music vid' and made the grooming, the dealing and drug taking look quite glamorous. The prostitution bit was a bit more scary, but even in that she seemed confident and in control.
I think it could be shown in schools from age 12 upwards as part of a lesson, complete with discussion about the various issues it raises.
For possibly unsupervised cinema watching, I'd think a 15 cert would be appropriate.

DontSHOUTTTTTT Wed 10-Apr-13 21:17:49

At 15+ it's a bit late to start educating those who may be prone to running away. I wouldn't show it to my kids, ages 20, 19 and 15 as I don't think they would learn anything from it. They learnt more from having conversations when we were out and about. We would see someone on the street and talk about why they were there.

15+ seems about right but it a bit style over substance. Bits of it seem like an episode of Skins sad. I would have thought something more 'honest' and real would be more engaging. A few interviews with kids who have actually run away might be more compelling and easy to relate too.

It would be ok to show the film in schools as it would be a starter for discussions.

Lockedout434 Wed 10-Apr-13 22:21:45

~ Would you share it with your teenage DC (if you have one/will have one soon!)?

It's too implied and not explicit as other posters have said the girl doesn't change. There are some police shots of people from first drug arrest to 6 months later after a few more arrests and the change seen is more affecting and an alteration in the girls appearance would be more affective.
~ Would you use it as a conversation starter about the topic of running away from home? Possibly but train spotting or other documentaries and court cases ie oldham grooming cases would be a better starter
~ This has been classified as Cert 15 for cinema use, do you agree? At what age do you think it would be appropriate for children to see it? Yes 15 appears to be ok
~ Do you think the video should be shown at school? It would need a lot of explanation and more information of how to get help.

MrsWolowitz Thu 11-Apr-13 08:13:22

I would show this to a teenager but I'm not sure it would be effective. The message was quite subtle and the first half may even appeal to teenagers (being given chips/parties/staying out with no restrictions).

The video could have been grittier and more obvious in its message. If its already rated as 15 then it could have been more graphic. Not to be gratuitous but to have more shock factor and to stick in the memory of young people who watch it. I don't think this is shocking or memorable, especially not for teenagers.

Certainly not 'real' enough to be shocking or to make kids realise they are not invincible. Agree with other posters in that everything was too implied: the danger, the risks, the horror of living on the streets, the hunger, lack of sanitation. I have a 15 year old daughter and will show her this when she wakes up and ask what she thinks but I don't imagine it would make a great impact, sorry

I will also show it to my 12 year old son and see if his reaction is different and whether he understands the drug and prostitution references.

I would be happy for my kids to be shown this at school.

snowballschanceineaster Thu 11-Apr-13 11:01:30

My dd is 12. I wouldn't show her this now, but not because it's too old for her. She is a very young 12 in some ways...has a 48 year old head on her shoulder in others. We have talked about drugs, drinking, internet dangers and poor choices generally and she takes it in, but then says it's not really anything I should worry about.

She has her own space and when she gets frustrated with us, she goes there.

If she started to talk about running away, or if her relationship with us deteriorated and I felt it was a risk, I'd show her this. I don't think I'm being naive thinking it wouldn't happen to us...I know how quickly things can deteriorate in families, but I do think that we currently are not at risk of this happening. If it was shown at school, I wouldn't worry about it but at a cinema, I'd worry about the context. If a kid had just popped to the pictures to see a movie and this came on, I think there'd be lots of eye rolling and nudging. I also agree that some elements look a little glamorised and not quite gritty enough.

snowballschanceineaster Thu 11-Apr-13 11:19:42

My dd is 12. I wouldn't show her this now, but not because it's too old for her. She is a very young 12 in some ways...has a 48 year old head on her shoulder in others. We have talked about drugs, drinking, internet dangers and poor choices generally and she takes it in, but then says it's not really anything I should worry about.

She has her own space and when she gets frustrated with us, she goes there.

If she started to talk about running away, or if her relationship with us deteriorated and I felt it was a risk, I'd show her this. I don't think I'm being naive thinking it wouldn't happen to us...I know how quickly things can deteriorate in families, but I do think that we currently are not at risk of this happening. If it was shown at school, I wouldn't worry about it but at a cinema, I'd worry about the context. If a kid had just popped to the pictures to see a movie and this came on, I think there'd be lots of eye rolling and nudging. I also agree that some elements look a little glamorised and not quite gritty enough.

snowballschanceineaster Thu 11-Apr-13 11:20:05

Sorry...this posted twice.

prettybird Thu 11-Apr-13 13:17:28

Another one who thinks it is not gritty enough. The party looks too much fun and it is not clear enough that the girl who offered her chips may have been "grooming" her. Actress stays too clean too - and the effect of the drugs is not nasty enough. Unless things are spelled out to teenagers, they will assume that "the worst" wouldn't happen to them.

~ Would you share it with your teenage DC (if you have one/will have one soon!)?
Possibly - but think we would get more traction by using news items or TV shows like CSI as "warnings".
~ Would you use it as a conversation starter about the topic of running away from home?
See above.
~ This has been classified as Cert 15 for cinema use, do you agree? At what age do you think it would be appropriate for children to see it?
I think 12A would probably be OK for it - but that's maybe because I have a mature 12 year old
~ Do you think the video should be shown at school?
Yes - and used as an opportunity for further extension work.

Dooohhh Thu 11-Apr-13 13:21:18

I. Think deffinatley not 15, maybe the beginning of year 6 or something.

releasethehounds Thu 11-Apr-13 13:42:11

Good video but not as shocking as I expected it to be. I'd definitely show it to my 14 year old DD (and younger), but sadly I don't think it would be the most shocking thing she has ever seen. There is far worse to be seen on the internet, even if you are a parent who takes an interest - you can't be watching with them all the time. I don't think the video has any surprises - it's a lot harder for a parent of a teen to watch it than a teen tbh. Agree with prettybird - the video could stand to be a lot harder-hitting.

releasethehounds Thu 11-Apr-13 13:52:21

Just shown the video to DD (14) - she wasn't particularly impressed by it. Her only comment was that more time should be spent on looking at the issues which cause teens to run away from home in the first place.

SlambangSweepstakeQueen Thu 11-Apr-13 14:49:23

Just watched the video with a view to showing it to my 2 teenaged sons and it's really pissed me off as it's so very very anti male.

According to the most recent stats 10% of females run away at some point and 8% of males (so not such a very big difference). Boys also get abused, hooked on drugs and sexually assaulted. Yet in this vid the males are only shown as sexual aggressors and predators. There are any number of leery males at the party plus a creepy pimp and customer but not a single male is shown as vulnerable or victimised. What will this video say to my teenaged sons?

It certainly wont make them think of the dangers to themselves of running away. It may make them feel slightly guilty about how the male in society tends to exploit the female. It may make them view girls as particularly vulnerable and open to exploitation. I expect they'll feel it has no bearing on them whatsoever.

Would you share it with your teenage DC?
~ Would you use it as a conversation starter about the topic of running away from home?
~ Do you think the video should be shown at school?

For the reasons above the answer to all the questions above is NO.

And cert 15 at the cinema? I think it's not hard hitting enough to merit a 15 certificate. By 15 most children who may runaway are already doing it or close. I'd say a 12 cert with a clearer message and a less biaised POV.

Just showed this to my 15 year old daughter. She said she thought it would make teenagers think about consequences and possibilities. She thought it was honest enough but said that coming from a happy, secure home, running away and it's inherent dangers was simply not something she had ever given any thought to. She felt that there was no need to show more shocking images to get the point across and that the scenes showing the grooming and trafficking were obvious. I still stand by my opinion that the film makers could have gone further.

She did comment on the lack of phone number or website to contact if you were in trouble and wanted to talk to someone confidentially.

Mynewmoniker Thu 11-Apr-13 15:42:15

I work with teenagers.

I don't think it's gritty enough. Compare it to CEOP's videos and they win it for me because they don't leave stuff to be worked out and they have voice overs.

AnnMumsnet (MNHQ) Thu 11-Apr-13 15:54:11

Hello Thanks for all your comments so far.

Railway Children have asked us to pass on the following "Thank you for your questions/ queries regarding what happens to boys on the streets. You are right, this video shows the story of a teenage girl, but boys can be just as vulnerable. As you may have already seen on our ‘running away’ advice pages, research has shown that girls do tend to run away more often than boys – though boys tend to run away for longer.

Boys can also be exploited by older men on the streets and we have seen cases of boys selling their bodies to get some food or somewhere to stay.

We at Railway Children are aware of the issues boys face, as well as girls, and through detached youth work and other forms of outreach, we work through our partners with both sexes to make sure issues such as exploitation and abuse are discussed with them, and that they are made aware of the dangers they face and how to avoid them.

If you’re interested in finding out more, you may be interested to read the results of some of our research www.railwaychildren.org.uk/media/26589/off_the_radar_summary.pdf"

I would show this to dd15. We often have convos about 'social issues' so this would be the same. IME teenagers now are more worldly than I was growing up in the 70's, so I think it could be shown in secondary schools from 13.

MadAboutHotChoc Thu 11-Apr-13 18:45:33

where are the subtitles?

This is a rather good campaign but a few points:

1. It is focussed towards girls - there should be a male equivalent
2. The girl in the video looks old(er) to me, I think some 15yos that I have worked with might have difficulty relating to her
3. I would want the key message (make the invisible visible(?)) more clear - this was a bit lost
4. It could be used as a conversation starter - but there are hundreds of conversations in there - from running away from home/sex/drugs/alcohol etc......way too many conversations to tackle in one video
5. This could be used in schools - could it possibly be tied in alongside one of the set texts for English(?) or possible Geography - it might be better to start that type of conversation in a structured academic way and then do follow ups in PSHE etc.

As someone who does similar work in primary schools for a different charity - this piece is not standalone and needs to be accompanied by a significant amount of either literature/website or adult/teacher input - however fantastic work nonetheless.

Doinmummy Thu 11-Apr-13 20:26:30

I will show it to DD15, but think it could do with being a lot more graphic. Teens these days ( or at least my DD and her mates) watch horror films so feel that they need to be properly shocked for it to have the desired impact. It depends on the age of the teen that's watching it I guess.

fortyplus Fri 12-Apr-13 00:40:51

i think the music hides the grim reality - it needs to be darker - not necessarily more graphic but definitely more scary. And yes it should be shown in schools once the message is clearer. I would have shown it to mine at 15 - they're 17 & 19 now

napoleon Fri 12-Apr-13 08:30:34

this is a great video, i would show it to teeens along with a talk on these things, i also think boys need to be aware of the dangers for them also, they often feel they are less vulnerable than the girls.

sashh Fri 12-Apr-13 08:54:57

~ Would you share it with your teenage DC (if you have one/will have one soon!)?

Don't have one. My teenage self would have thought that looked better than being at home.

~ Would you use it as a conversation starter about the topic of running away from home?

Not sure.

~ This has been classified as Cert 15 for cinema use, do you agree? At what age do you think it would be appropriate for children to see it?

I think it depends on when and where. It needs to be used as a resource along with other interventions.

~ Do you think the video should be shown at school?

Possibly, again with it wrapped in among other information.

My basic feeling is that this is typical of every other time I've seen a runaway portrayed, whether in a soap opera or film, or whatever.

I came within a whisker of running away as a teenager, I was also considering suicide. I was in a bad place and needed a way out, I got that in the form of an abusive relationship, but it was still better than living at home.

What this doesn't show is what alternatives there are, if there are any.

Children do not run to something, they are running away from something, maybe there should be somewhere for them to run to? Maybe for a few hours, maybe long term.

As far as I know there isn't anything, but I will go look at the Railway children website

Timetoask Fri 12-Apr-13 09:04:04

I think this very visual medium is excellent to reach out to young people.
However, I think this particular video is not shocking enough.
The music is too "fun", it should be something much more dramatic.
I should be feeling upset after watching it and I didn't.
I think it would be more useful to have a short "documentary" like video with real people (identities could be hidden) talking about what happened to them.

Callofthefishwife Fri 12-Apr-13 11:18:49

Its powerful but not gritty and shocking enough for teens.

My 14yo just watched it and shrugged and said "that was a nice ending - not".

11yo just watched the last bit and commented on how depressing it was.

I will obviously discuss it further with them both but my feeling is although it is a powerful film it lacks shock - which is one way to make the penny drop for teens.

coreny Fri 12-Apr-13 11:55:08

I think cert 15 is about right and I think it should be shown in schools but alongside appropriate input so that children get a chance to discuss the issues.

I'd like to see something helping children who are just at the stage of feeling that they may want to run away. What help us there- who do they go to? Perhaps a video demonstrating this would be helpful.

I may show it to my 14 year old ds but I think he'll say that the party looks like fun.
apart from the prostitution at the end it looks like a 'cool' lifestyle compared to going to school and doing homework etc.

My ds won't be able to imagine himself in the situation of the girl in the video I don't think. He'll think that it couldn't happen to him.

The video seems to be aimed at an adult point of view rather than a child's. The men leering at the girl when she was dancing will go right over the heads of many teens for example.

Gen Fri 12-Apr-13 19:05:40

Yes, I will show it to my teenage children and use it to discuss the issues it raises. I think 15 is fine in the cinema, but it does need to be shown and then discussed, whereas teenagers go to the cinema with friends therefore the discussion points maybe missed e.g. grooming/can't trust people etc. I think it is fine to use in schools. I already use some of the Railway Children lesson ideas in my PSHE lessons and will be using this, perhaps in conjunction with the Comic Relief and Eastenders story line a few years ago.

littleboo21 Fri 12-Apr-13 20:03:29

As awful as the film is I don't think it warrants a 15 cert, I think certain aspects such as the prostitution need more focus and less on the drugs and alcohol as they can be seen as 'attractive' to youngsters. I can see many 15/16 yr olds wanting to be prostitutes

flow4 Fri 12-Apr-13 20:14:48

Would you share it with your teenage DC (if you have one/will have one soon!)? Have done - see below.

Would you use it as a conversation starter about the topic of running away from home? No. I don't think it's very good (sorry). I have boys, and this is definitely about a girl. It's too glossy. The actress looks too old - my son says 17-20, I thought the top end of that. But most importantly, it doesn't actually make the link that this is about kids running away from home - my son had to be told that. At face value, it could be about a student or other young woman making dangerous choices.

This has been classified as Cert 15 for cinema use, do you agree? At what age do you think it would be appropriate for children to see it? This is a 'safe' limit.

Do you think the video should be shown at school? Probably not. My experience of PSHE/RESPECT/ERIC (whatever they call it) is that it's taught well by good teachers, and really badly by bad teachers... This is quite a complex, taboo subject, and I can imagine some teachers really messing up the discussion!

Now comments about the vid from DS2 (13)... He says...
(Firstly, as the caption appears at the end)... "And 95% of them come straight back home again... Seriously, does that 5% include the kids who just get as far as the bottom of the garden?"

Then "It's trying to show you what it's like when you run away from home. This is a bad case. There are probably a very limited number of people who have a bad experience like this. It wouldn't put me off. But then I wouldn't want to run away from home anyway. I wouldn't want to be on the street, and going to parties, and taking drugs, and being a prostitute... She got a false sense of security - she thought she was getting away from the streets, but then she ended up messing up her life... But something must have been very bad at home to make her think this was better".

His comment about whether to show this in school was "Nah. Some kids can't handle this kind of thing at all"...

DoTheBestThingsInLifeHaveFleas Fri 12-Apr-13 20:49:38

I agree with muchbrighternow. I would show it to a teen, BUT I think it almost looks appealing. She is immediately befriended and heads off to what could be percieved as a 'cool' party, the sort of thing they have on Skins, and the drug taking looks like it could be cool too, and the hint of prostitution is way too subtle. When I was a teen I would have thought it was just some man at a party she was having sex with....

ColinFirthsGirth Fri 12-Apr-13 23:21:58

I would show my children this when they are teenagers. I also agree that the message is too subtle.I am not sure that evry teenager will get what the video is trying to say. I think a video like this should be shown in schools and that a 15 certificate would be appropriate for a cinema.

Pacific Sat 13-Apr-13 08:23:58

Watched it with my heart in my mouth saying "Nooo! NOOO! Don't do it" so it was effective for me.

I have older teenagers who are probably past the danger age but I think this would be most effective for 11/12/13 year olds.

I also agree with some of the comments above saying if a child is suffering at home this could be the better option. sad This film could be followed with a film about getting help through legitimate channels.

There used to be a split screen film for teenagers shown on TV in Scotland with one side of the film showing the same teenager making good choices. In the final scene the 'good' teenager passed the drug addict beggar in the street but they were the same person!

RatherBeOnThePiste Sat 13-Apr-13 08:55:19

Watched with my son 13 and DD 15,

Would you share it with your teenage DC
Yes and I did

Would you use it as a conversation starter about the topic of running away from home?
Generally and also about vulnerability, thinking of others that may worry them, reasons for going, where to find help, yes, but think it needed to be grittier.

This has been classified as Cert 15 for cinema use, do you agree? At what age do you think it would be appropriate for children to see it? Hmmmm, I think by 15 it is rather late, although I'd like it harder hitting, I think appropriate for younger but only with adults to talk to afterwards. Not sure cinema is the right place.

Do you think the video should be shown at school? Yes, definitely, I think a perfect video for schools to initiate discussions, really an important part of the film would be the discussion after although I know a lot of implied content went over DS's head, which is why I think the cinema is wrong for this.

Thought the party looked a bit too much like fun, but of course she is being sucked into drug taking. DS missed the prostitiution bit really, DD was horrified

Maybe not graphic enough re the drug taking

Music - possibly more sinister would be better?

Shallishanti Sat 13-Apr-13 13:17:49

Would you share it with your teenageer
would have no objection, but it seems a bit random- he's supposed to be revising!

Would you use it as a conversation starter about the topic of running away from home?
Probably not, I don't think it does the job very well. It doesn't highlight dangers for boys. The dangers for girls are only there to be seen by someone who already knows what they are. The timescale isn't clear and the emotions aren't either, so it looks like you go from homeless to heroin to prostitution in about 2 days. I think soaps deal with things FAR better (eg Whitney's story in East Enders, much as I think EE is mostly ridiculous, they do 'issues' well- and it is a much easier conversation starter than 'hey come and look what I've found on you tube'- DS would just say- 'why are you showing me this?')

This has been classified as Cert 15 for cinema use, do you agree? At what age do you think it would be appropriate for children to see it?

no objection to a 15 classification but not sure it will work- could easily be shown to younger children but only with a LOT of work around it

Do you think the video should be shown at school?
well, maybe, it all depends how it's done. You would be very reliant on the teacher having lots of additional knowledge (and skill)

anklebitersmum Sat 13-Apr-13 13:30:19

Would I show it?
No, it' a bit 'meh'

Cert 15
It's way too bland for a 15. This needs to be grittier by far if that's the target age, there needs to be a boy-orientated version and there should be a hard hitting reality check as regards how parents/families feel. Teens are intrinsically selfish after all.

Show in secondary school?
Yes, show this one from from year 7 but have a gritty one for year 9/10 and above.

donnie Sat 13-Apr-13 22:44:38

WOULD I SHOW IT? - my eldest dd is 11 and I think maybe she is still a bit young but certainly from the age of around 12 I would.

CERT 15? - I also think it is a little too safe. I think the drug aspect could have been made more explicit, as well as the prostitution /sexual exploitation.

SHOW IN SEC SCHOOLS? - for sure. I think it could catalyse a lot of very healthy discussion and debate.

retvet Sun 14-Apr-13 01:40:04

It's ok as far as it goes but too negative and not enough info on how to get help so this doesn't happen. By negative I mean it could be starting point for discussion If you need to run away or feel you need to how to access help and how to find help so you can be safe and more emphasis on how common it is to feel there is no way forward and how there is always another way if you can only find it. that would be what I would put in as that is really hard to find when you need help and feel really down and especially if you are really low. I personally would show it and watch it with my children when they were about 11. I don't think many children wouldn't have seen worse by the time they were 15.

Witco Sun 14-Apr-13 07:09:14

Yes!

primroseyellow Sun 14-Apr-13 18:21:34

The film made me think of of a student project, trying to be arty and hint at issues rather than confronting them. It was far too vague to be meaningful. I know a YP who ran away at 17, because they just couldn't communicate with parents, didn't feel accepted for what they were, couldn't be the person parents wanted them to be. This film completely misses the point, ie the YPs reasons for running away in the first place. If they feel bad enough to want to run away no amount of telling them the dangers they will face is going to work.

primroseyellow Sun 14-Apr-13 18:27:18

I've remembered what this film reminds me of: the early TV AIDs adverts, back in the 1980s I think. All subtle hints without any explicit explanation, designed to scare not educate.

sunmonkey Sun 14-Apr-13 20:26:19

My son is still small. But I would feel this would be irrelevant for him anyway when he's older as its not focusing on a teenage boy. I also think its glamourising too much, she never really looks like she's having an awful time of it. It needs to be scarier and shocking. However I agree with the previous posters who talked about the kids that come from homes where its not safe anyway - a way to leave home and give information about what help is out there would be a good idea.

TreeLuLa Sun 14-Apr-13 21:56:13

I agree with the poster above:

Would you share it with your teenage DC (if you have one/will have one soon!)? Yes
~ Would you use it as a conversation starter about the topic of running away from home? Yes. Id like a boy version too!
~ This has been classified as Cert 15 for cinema use, do you agree? At what age do you think it would be appropriate for children to see it? Yes, 15 is about right
~ Do you think the video should be shown at school? Yes, to Y9/10/11s

ArtsMumma Mon 15-Apr-13 02:22:24

I would show this to a teenager but I'm not sure it is quite gritty enough... I think it needs a little more of the fallout; the combination of the music and imagery do glamorise aspects a little so balance it with some more hard-hitting consequences.

have thought about it some more and my conclusion is if it's meant to be educational it fails because there isn't much info there at all, if it's meant to be emotive (re: a scare tactic) it doesn't work for all the reasons i, and others said.

it's pretty but it's not shocking and it's not educational so??

as another educator said this could be used by a teacher to open some discussions but it would be the skill of the facilitator rather than the effectiveness of the film that would be put to the test there.

it's only now i've thought about it again that i've made the link that maybe the 'party' is the men viewing the girl so that she can be paid for later? it is all way too vague.

borninastorm Mon 15-Apr-13 10:42:11

I would show this to my DC before they became teenagers to start the conversation of homelessness. I would do this in the hope that it would allow me to continue the conversation as they got older and became teenagers.
I've done this already with other 'hard' topics and it means my two teenagers and I have some very interesting dinner time conversations because nothing is out of bounds for discussion and we'll all be very open with each other.
My instant reaction to the image of the girl walking towards her first night of prostitution was that she looked a bit smug about it as she stuck her chin up and outwards. But upon consideration I realised she was actually steeling herself.
To address your questions:
1. I'd show it to tweenagers to begin the conversation
2. I'd show it to my teenagers (14 and 19) now to start the conversation
3. I think it should be classified for younger audiences - 15 is too late, too many teenagers are already homeless by then cos the problems that cause homelessness often start way before that age. I think it's appropriate for age 10 and up. At that age they won't fully understand it but it would open the lines of communication to discuss running away from home and what that can lead to.
4. I'd be happy for it to be shown to my child in school from around age 10

borninastorm Mon 15-Apr-13 10:42:57

One more thing - if it's to be shown just to teenagers then it needs to be more hard-hitting to be as effective as we want/need it to be.

Jux Mon 15-Apr-13 13:13:40

My dd is 13. I don't think I'd show it to her, but I'm thinking about it still....

I don't think it is anywhere offputting enough. She looks OK, she doesn't appear to have declined much, nothing that bad is seen to happen to her. She smiles at a child in the street. She begs and is given food and invited to a party - which she seems to enjoy. She smokes (heroin?) and looks fairly blissful. She seems OK as she goes into the room, not where a fat, ugly, smelly, old bloke is waiting leering. She doesn't get beaten up, she doesn't get raped. She doesn't get addicted. There's not much difference between how she seems at the beginning and how she seems at the end.

At 15 I would have thought it was exciting but scary.

gazzalw Tue 16-Apr-13 15:26:37

I thought it was commendable although I would probably show it to my Twelve year old. It would be more impractical aimed at tweens rather than know-how-all teens. Although I am not entirely sure my son would 'get' it all. It would be the start of a series of conversations

Yes would be good to have a more specific to boys version too

Yes it would be entirely appropriate to show it at school in the context of talking about running away but also interlinked subjects of drugs and falling into prostitution.....

wonderingagain Tue 16-Apr-13 17:40:10

Would you share it with your teenage DC (if you have one/will have one soon!)?
Yes
~ Would you use it as a conversation starter about the topic of running away from home?
Yes because it may have a knockon effect if her friends consider it. But children do this as a last resort because their home life is worse. An alternative to offer them might be better so I would like to have seen more signposting so "you're going from a bad situation to another bad situation but to avoid it you can contact xxx for support" It needs to be acknowledged that their feelings must be pretty bad to want to run away in the first place
A lot of the references are too subtle for children to understand and the video narrative should start at the end and work backwards IMO, this would make the references make more sense.
~ This has been classified as Cert 15 for cinema use, do you agree? At what age do you think it would be appropriate for children to see it?
Year 10.
~ Do you think the video should be shown at school? Yes

ballstoit Tue 16-Apr-13 19:51:12

Cant view as not available for mobile devices and no sound on laptop

i'm still thinking about this unfortunately.

reality is that at the point of feeling you had no choice but to have sex with some man you didn't want to have sex with you would go home unless home was worse than that.

that's the reality. this film might scare nice little children whose home was better than this and whose parents cared enough to discuss these kinds of issues with but for a child for whom sexual abuse was a reality let's face it having a bit of heroin and getting a party beforehand would be an improvement.

i guess the producers could do with explaining to us just who their target audience was and what their intended learning outcomes were from this video. if it was 'at risk' teens then... if it was to preach to the choir as they say then maybe but what would be the point of that?

yep - my conclusion is that this totally ignores the 'from' of running away. kids run away 'from' something. they don't just think ah i'm bored of my safe, secure, stable home and reckon i'll go on a jolly. the 'from' and what help there is an alternative to running is what needs to be addressed.

this is actually quite insulting to a teen who is facing beatings, sexual abuse, no food/heat/attention/etc at home. it actually smacks of not getting just how bad things are for some young people.

my first teaching placement brought me into contact with a guy who (despite the alphabet soup and blah on the register by his name) was just unlucky enough to have been born to a smack addict and was strong/brave/smart enough to have packed a bag and taken himself to SS one day after weeks of no power, food or anything else in his 'home'.

these kids need a, 'you can come to us' message not just a ooh it's bad out there message. many face worse on a daily basis at home than is shown in this clip.

wonderingagain Wed 17-Apr-13 01:53:03

Excellent post. I was wondering about target audience too.
I think that children should be taught more about what is unacceptable at home and where to seek help if they need it. Children need similar support to abused women in that respect.

AnotherAlias Wed 17-Apr-13 03:59:47

knowing a teen who has left home home fairly recently - I would be very very surprised if this would have put her off. "bad influences" that appealed to vanity and other 'needs' - a big pull factor.

~ Would you share it with your teenage DC (if you have one/will have one soon!)?
I wouldn't object to them seeing it, but on its own, I don't think it explains enough about how you can descend into dispair on the streets. for a kid at risk, I think this video portrays the "new friend" as relatively positive. Would definitely need to be discussed with an adult as I think some of the messages are open to mis interpretation.

~ Would you use it as a conversation starter about the topic of running away from home?
Well in our case, it is a bit late as we have had it happen in our immediate circley already, but it could possibly be of some use. I wonder what the psychology is with teenagers though? is it effective mediated by parents - or more effective if something speaks for itself or is passed around among mates?

~ This has been classified as Cert 15 for cinema use, do you agree? At what age do you think it would be appropriate for children to see it?

15 is fine, they seem much "worse" than this via facebook, youtube / their mobile (in london comprehensives anyway - the stuff my dd will watch (without any concern that we see it either) can be shocking). Afraid this is relatively mild. Also they witness and are very aware of the kind of pressure some kids are under from issues including gangs atm - this video seems mild compared to the psychological pressure kids seem to be exposed to on a day to day basis if my dc's friends are to be believed.

~ Do you think the video should be shown at school?

possibly - I think maybe if you interviewed the person I know* it might be more effective (she is still to some extent deluded about the way her life is going - the only upside with her is that at least she is in partial contact with family via social media - or even a few screen shots of her FB page and the kind of things she is posting might wake up a few teenagers....it tells a pretty grim story - but maybe that is my adult mind reading between the lines?. *clearly there would be lots of issues with doing this 'for real'

Autismmumma Wed 17-Apr-13 21:25:11

I would show this to my son when he's a teen, it would prompt a lot of discussion.
It's gritty and hard-hitting and yes, it should be shown in schools but needs adequate narrative and then discussion afterwards.

This feels pitched at parent sof teenagers rath than at teenagers.

Agree that it is very anti male and that girl does not look un cared for... What does the video want teenager to do? Not runaway? Better to show options.... and girl taking up options...?

Party looked dangerous I thought... but maybe not to younger veiwers

chesh2506 Fri 19-Apr-13 11:03:49

My son is 13. I would and will show him this video. In a world like todays when they have access to internet, we cant always monitor, I feel its better we are totally honest and open with them and encourage showing/warning of "real life" as it sadly can be today sad

Mouseface Mon 22-Apr-13 14:54:18

I have a teenage DD, she's 14. I watched the video and thought 'so what'?

~ Would you share it with your teenage DC (if you have one/will have one soon!)?

A - I did show it to her and she was confused as to what on earth it was I was showing her until the writing came up at the end. Even then she thought it was an advert to try to put teens off drugs, girls at that too.

~ Would you use it as a conversation starter about the topic of running away from home?

A - No, it was not relevant in the least. We've talked about her running away already.

~ This has been classified as Cert 15 for cinema use, do you agree? At what age do you think it would be appropriate for children to see it?

A - I wouldn't show it in a cinema as a 'runaway' advisory ad... it's just wrong

~ Do you think the video should be shown at school?

A - Not as a runaway ad. I just don't think much of this, it's not shocking, it's more like something you'd see for a 'don't do drink or drugs' ad campaign IMO.

I get the hint at the prostitution at the end, that's where she might end up to feed her 'habit', a habit that we see once? It's not hardcore enough.

I don't think it hits hard enough, my DD wasn't shocked or even upset after watching it, she wasn't even sure what the point was until the end when the writing came on the screen.

There needs to be shots of worried parent(s), family, friends, calls being made. Have you seen X? The shots of the teen looking for somewhere to sleep, eat. Ditch the music, it's all a bit timid. My DD said that watching that wouldn't make her think twice about leaving.

I also think that there needs to be helpline numbers, local schemes in local areas for parents AND children to call for help and support.

It needs to show more time, teens don't JUST run away, for one night of drugs and grooming into prostitution... there's a lot more to it. It needs to show more devastation, more shock IMO.

carriemumsnet (MNHQ) Tue 23-Apr-13 12:26:23

Hi all

Thanks so much for all your valuable input - there are some really interesting thoughts and ideas and we may well come back to you to gather more opinions/ feedback in the future. Don't forget you can help contribute to this campaign by joining the dedicated Mumsnet Panel here, signing up to the Railway Children's newsletter here or finding out more here and each time you do one of these things Aviva will donate £2 to the Railway Children's valuable work.

In the meantime the Railway Children wanted to respond to some of your queries and have asked us to post the following message:

"Thanks to all who have posted thoughts, comments and questions on this thread. As you know we will be working with Mumsnet during the rest of the year to raise awareness of these issues and your feedback is extremely helpful and valuable to us in order to develop this campaign further.

We also wanted to provide some further stats and facts regarding the number of children and young people who have experienced the issues covered in the film. We will also be exploring the issue of the risks and consequences a child could experience if they run away from home and will be posting more information on the info pages here: www.mumsnet.com/runningaway in the next couple of weeks, so do check back for more.

'Off the Radar' research, a report carried out by Railway Children based on interviews with children and young people with first-hand experience of running away from home, found that:
- Of the 103 young runaways interviewed all had used drugs or alcohol to varying degrees, with some as young as 9 years old using ecstasy, cannabis and cocaine, and some as young as 12 using heroin.
- Just under a fifth had experienced sexual exploitation which took a number of forms; having sexual relations with older men and in one case a woman, being forced to have sex for money by a boyfriend, being shared for sex by groups of men and selling sex on the streets.

Sadly the link between running away and being sexually exploited is also backed up by other independent research:
- A survey of young people using sexual exploitation services in 2011 found that over half had run away at least once, and a quarter had run away over 10 times - S Jago et al (2011) What's going on to safeguard children and young people from sexual exploitation? Univ of Bedfordshire, p48, p107.

- An inquiry by the Office of the Children's Commissioner, in which they interviewed young people being sexually exploited in gangs and groups, found that 70% were going missing repeatedly.

Still Running 3 by The Children's Society found that:
- 1 in 8 young runaways had stolen, 1 in 11 had begged and 1 in 9 had done 'other things' in order to survive after running away.
- 1 in 6 runaways slept rough or stayed with someone they had only just met.'

Thanks again for your support."

Greenkit Tue 23-Apr-13 17:57:13

~Would you share it with your teenage DC (if you have one/will have one soon!)? Yes will share with both my children son 15 and daughter 16

~ Would you use it as a conversation starter about the topic of running away from home? I will discuss most things with my children anyway, using various programmes. Yes we could use this to discuss running away

~ This has been classified as Cert 15 for cinema use, do you agree? At what age do you think it would be appropriate for children to see it? from age 10, I dont think its very graffic, just suggestive. I would like to see a more hard hitting video for over 14's

~ Do you think the video should be shown at school? Yes

CuppaTeaAndAJammieDodger Wed 24-Apr-13 13:11:34

I agree with an earlier poster that the party scene may seem exciting to a teenager.

Offred Wed 24-Apr-13 14:30:48

~ Would you share it with your teenage DC (if you have one/will have one soon!)?
Don't have one but would if they were or nearly were.

~ Would you use it as a conversation starter about the topic of running away from home?
Possibly, although I've already spoken to mine about it.

~ This has been classified as Cert 15 for cinema use, do you agree? At what age do you think it would be appropriate for children to see it?
I think it is pretty tame compared to some of the things that are considered appropriate even for little ones.

~ Do you think the video should be shown at school?
Yes.

Further comments

I think the incremental progression is expressed well although I think teens watching it may react with "I wouldn't be stupid enough to take serious drugs in the first place so it doesn't apply to me" type reactions I still think it will make them think about the issue of logical progression. For me though this would have had no effect. I knew the consequences of running away, I felt them preferable to home, probably because they maybe were.

It doesn't offer any hope or help. It is simply a grim and oppressive warning. Watching it would have depressed me, possibly given me ideas about drugs and prostitution. The idea of becoming a sex worker would not have particularly frightened me because I had been raped and at the time did not care/sought out sexual abuse.

I think however that teens are more at risk from alcohol than from getting addicted to hard drugs which, although a risk, comes later, after the drinking. Sleeping with men for a home is common and drinking to cope with that is common too. Class As and formally becoming a prostitute is an extreme version of that, which is obviously bad so I can see why it was chosen.

I suspect the children that may react to this in the desired way are not the ones who might run away.

Offred Wed 24-Apr-13 14:35:37

I think probably it irritates me a little because the implication is that teens don't consider the consequences or make at least a semi-informed choice about running away. It is all 'silly little girl, bad things will happen to you' whereas I think a lot of runaways will consider running away as the way to take control of their lives and know that bad things will happen but act pragmatically to feel in control of those things rather than feel or be swept up like a victim. in that way it is very simplistic and therefore redundant as it is reasoning perhaps appropriate for age 5-8s presented to teenagers.

nooka Fri 26-Apr-13 05:56:35

~ Would you share it with your teenage DC (if you have one/will have one soon!)?

I showed the video to my 12 year old dd, and I'll see if I can get 13 year old ds to watch it too (dd is generally more likely to look at stuff and having seen the video is probably not going to be very interested).

~ Would you use it as a conversation starter about the topic of running away from home?

dd said 'why would I run away from home when I have computers/consoles here'. That sounds flip, but she has already done lots of stuff at school about homelessness/poverty and is pretty savy. She is well aware that other people live (or not) with very bad situations and that she is very fortunate. She is only 12 though, I'm sure she will hate us/life etc soon enough!

~ This has been classified as Cert 15 for cinema use, do you agree? At what age do you think it would be appropriate for children to see it?

I think this is fine for kids younger than 15 - I didn't think there was anything inappropriate or scary for dd

~ Do you think the video should be shown at school?

I think this could be shown at school, but as others have said it needs an equivalent for boys because there's not much for them to relate to.

dd and I looked at some of the early comments and she was a bit scathing about those that thought teenagers wouldn't pick up on the messages. She thought that the fading away technique was a really effective way to show that the girl was losing herself. She also thought that the party was scary, and the prostitution obvious. She didn't think that the drug taking scene was glamorous, but we've talked quite a bit about drugs with her and her brother (mainly to modify the 'all drugs are terrible' message they got from school which I felt would ultimately be counterproductive because it's not really true and most teens are bright enough to know that).

She said it reminded her of this video (Ed Sheeran's A team), which is one of her current favourites and hard hitting enough to have the homeless big issue selling drug taking prostitute dead by the end of the track (actually I think she might be dead at the beginning).

RebekahF Sun 28-Apr-13 17:26:33

Any conversation starter is good in my opinion but I am not sure it would be explicit enough for some teenagers. I am not sure the answer is to make it more explicit but perhaps some more written messages during or after the video may provide some explanation and guidance to the watcher. I wonder also if some teenagers may feel patronised/stigmatised by this as it follows a very particular narrative and one which is often told about them. I appreciate it happens and I am not sure how to illustrate it differently but having worked in homelessness the first lesson I learnt is that we are all so close to being in that situation and it may help to show a bit more of the start of the story not just the consequences. This may also help teenagers watching feel more understood and not simply threaten with consequences.

dahville Tue 30-Apr-13 12:45:59

~ Would you share it with your teenage DC (if you have one/will have one soon!)?

I think it's fine to show a teenager and ask them what they think about it. I find setting it to music makes it too video-y and some of the message is lost

~ Would you use it as a conversation starter about the topic of running away from home?

I'd use it for general conversation

~ This has been classified as Cert 15 for cinema use, do you agree? At what age do you think it would be appropriate for children to see it?

Any child over 13 could view this, Cert 15 for the cinema is fine.

~ Do you think the video should be shown at school?

It would be up to each but as a parent I would not object.

Would you share it with your teenage DC (if you have one/will have one soon!)? Yes, i'd be happy to, but there are more hard hitting/frank videos I'd also show

~ Would you use it as a conversation starter about the topic of running away from home? Yes

~ This has been classified as Cert 15 for cinema use, do you agree? At what age do you think it would be appropriate for children to see it? I think that at age 15, something much more graphic would be more useful - the Ed Sheeran A Team video for example is more hard-hitting than this, although the invisibility/ gradually losing herself concept is a good one

~ Do you think the video should be shown at school? Yes, along with others. I agree with others who have posted about a boys version too

Mems Sat 04-May-13 11:47:56

Share with teenage DC - I watched it with DD2, 15 - we both thought it was going to be about what Railway Children do to help kids on the street in a practical way. Once we'd watched, DD2 wanted to know more of the back story as to why she's run away, also pointing out that some kids feel they have no choice, etc. & she said it was all a bit predictable "girl on streets ends up as prostitute". I felt it was a bit sanitised.
Conversation starter - we did have a chat about it but more on the why rather than what will happen when they do. DD2 said she'd be more interested if they concentrated on the reasons kids run away and that info on where they can get help, etc would be more useful.
Cert 15 - DD2 thinks it's more a 12 cert - tho did acknowledge that the last scene would probably set some adults chuntering.
Shown at school? - it's the sort of video they get shown in PHSE to promote discussion and awareness.

We both loved the music tho!

britney92 Sat 04-May-13 20:00:13

I was surprised it was a 15 as i thought it looked more like a ghetto chic pop video and certainly the teenagers i have come across at that age watch a lot more disturbing films than that. I think i myself watched trainspotting at a much younger age than 15. In some parts i think it would glamorise some aspects of running away as she looked way to clean and having fun in the underground club. I think it's more aimed at a 12 to 14 audience as it didn't have a impact on my 16 yr old or his friends that I watched it with.

tripleweetabix Thu 30-May-13 15:42:22

I think the figures are shocking wrt number of kids running away from home especially girls. The video needs to be more hard hitting to highlight the awful dangers out there ..

Lweji Fri 12-Jul-13 09:49:13

As adult, considered intelligent and knowing what it was about, I didn't think the message was clear at all.
The first time there's a hint is when she's begging, but then it seems to easy that she's getting help, then the drugs are not that obvious and there are no consequences to them (no arrests, no physical degradation).
Only the final scene may hit home, with the prostitution.

The music was not sufficiently grim either. It was somewhat uplifting. confused

hjmiller Wed 17-Jul-13 10:39:21

What about highlighting the dangers boys face? I think this is very focused towards girls, showing in schools may be beneficial but there should be something geared towards boys too, as at that age they may think only girls are at risk

RedRoseMummy Wed 17-Jul-13 15:55:13

~ Would you share it with your teenage DC (if you have one/will have one soon!)?
N/A

~ Would you use it as a conversation starter about the topic of running away from home?
My children are too young at the moment but I would definitely use a video like this to start a conversation when they are older.

~ This has been classified as Cert 15 for cinema use, do you agree? At what age do you think it would be appropriate for children to see it?
I think secondary school age children should be able to see this video. It isn't especially gritty and the smile as she inhales the heroin could be argued that it looks like she is really enjoying it! I think it could be used as a discussion point, perhaps in PHSE in schools, with supporting discussion to ensure that the children and young people actually fully understand what is happening in the video and the possible consequences of leaving home

~ Do you think the video should be shown at school?
Absolutely, but with supporting discussion in a classroom environment.

Letitsnow9 Thu 18-Jul-13 16:03:55

~ Would you share it with your teenage DC (if you have one/will have one soon!)? Yes
~ Would you use it as a conversation starter about the topic of running away from home? Yes
~ This has been classified as Cert 15 for cinema use, do you agree? At what age do you think it would be appropriate for children to see it? 12, if a child is too young it will go over their head rather than be upsetting
Should be shown in schools with more hard fact info and also places to go for real help

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