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NOW CLOSED Do you have a child with asthma? Please share your experiences with Lloydspharmacy and you could win a £100 John Lewis voucher

(76 Posts)
TheOtherHelenMumsnet (MNHQ) Tue 10-Apr-12 11:31:59

Lloydspharmacy would like to hear how Mumsnetters and their DC with asthma manage their symptoms and where they go for advice. Here is what Lloydspharmacy says about why it's working with Mumsnetters: "One in 11 children in the UK has asthma and it is the most common long-term medical condition for children. During April and May, Lloydspharmacy is blowing the whistle on asthma - we'd love to hear your views on how your DC cope with their asthma. We're also offering a free asthma check-up where we’ll take the time to discuss your concerns and advise on how your child can get the most from their asthma medicines."

So if you have a child with asthma, Lloydspharmacy would like to hear your thoughts on the questions below. We know that asthma can range from very severe to mild, so please only answer the questions where you feel comfortable doing so.

~ How well controlled is your child's asthma? How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?
~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here.
~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?
~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?

Please feel free to add any other comments you may have on this. Everyone who adds their comments to this thread will be entered into a prize draw where one MNer will win a £100 John Lewis voucher. Please note that your comments may appear in an email MNHQ will be sending out.

Thanks and good luck with the prize draw!
MNHQ

LadySybilDeChocolate Tue 10-Apr-12 11:39:48

How well controlled is your child's asthma?
It hasn't been very well controlled in the past. He would have benefited from a preventor as well as a reliever.

How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms?
Not very well as he doesn't always remember to carry an inhaler.

Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?
To make sure he uses the reliever before he does PE at school, to make sure his mouth and nose is covered in the cold weather as this triggers his asthma off.

How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here.
He's 13 so should be able to do this himself. I need to make sure he remembers to take them out with him though.

When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?
He's never had a review and support from the NHS has been limited. I take him back to the GP for inhalers but they just hand out the prescription rather then provide any helpful advice. I've had to learn myself, which is rediculous.

Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?
I have done previously.

Roseformeplease Tue 10-Apr-12 11:41:41

I have asthma and so does my son, aged 11. His is triggered by animals and is also linked with hay fever. He is pretty good about managing his asthma and takes a brown inhaler once or twice a day, knows about upping the dose for colds and if we visit people with animals. We keep Salvutamol inhalers everywhere: coat pockets, school bags, school office and I carry one as does my husband ( we both work at his school). He has never been in real distress and properly managed asthma means no scares. As a child I found my asthma terrifying and I have tried to ensure his is well managed. Our GP is very good and we now have annual checks at the village chemists.

colditz Tue 10-Apr-12 12:29:22

How well controlled is your child's asthma? How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms? Both children have asthma, and it's fairly well controlled. SOmtimes have difficulty making the school understand why their attendance was low... before I got it properly under control. If one of them is spoiling for an attack, I find a warm steamy shower can offer a lot of relief, and ward off a hospital trip, along with the inhalers, as it both steams them and relaxes them
~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here. Well, I don't really encourage them to use their inhaler, I tell them to. They've both been hospitalised before so they know what it's like, they know that it;s more likely if they don't use their inhaler
~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why? within a year, and they are useful at trialing different medications. I found that antihistimines help my oldest child in the summer, as his hay fever sometimes triggers his asthma, and it was at a review that this was suggested to me
~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not? I wouldn't go to a pharmacist because all asthma medication is prescription only - you have to go to a doctor or prescribing nurse and then pick up the meds from the pharmacy anyway. The doctor or nurse will tell me what I need to know, there's no gap in the market for a pharmacist unless they start being able to prescribe. Saying that, I had an inhaler loss emergancy once, and they were able to let me have one there and then, so long as they took mine and my son's doctor details and address.

Sittinginthesun Tue 10-Apr-12 12:31:42

DS2 is 5 years old, and was diagnosed at 3 years. Relatively mild, but he would cough all night for several months, and was so tired he looked almost grey. When he starting on an inhaler, he literally changed colour, went up a clothes size, and looked so "well".

We manage it okay. He uses a brown inhaler twice a day, with the dose doubled in December and January. We rarely use the blue inhaler, apart from in midwinter, although I was caught out a few weeks ago when he was playing outside in the dark, and got cold. It took me a week to get it under control - it was quite frightening.

His triggers are colds, and cold, damp air. If it is misty/foggy, I have to keep him quite wrapped up. His Reception teacher is good at remembering in school.

Sittinginthesun Tue 10-Apr-12 12:33:37

Oh, and he as annual check ups at the GPs. Best advice I have had was from the specialist asthma nurse who visits the surgery periodically.

KatyMac Tue 10-Apr-12 12:38:15

~ How well controlled is your child's asthma?
Terribly
How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms?
Badly
Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?
Take meds regularly see GP/Hospital when she gets a cold
~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler?
Don't really
How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not?
Watch them
Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here.
No - it's a nightmare
~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional?
6 weekly
How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?
Same old, same old - nothing changes
~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?
Yes but I got nowhere, she is on maximum meds already

DD has atypical asthma which doesn't respond well to viruses

hattifattner Tue 10-Apr-12 12:55:00

How well controlled is your child's asthma?

It was very well controlled until last year, when he reached 11, and suddenly we seemed to be up the hospital every 5 minutes. We finally, after a nightmare year, managed to persuade GP to change his meds. SInce then, he has not had an attack!

How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? Last year we got into a vicious circle, - he had a major attack in the January, requiring 2 days in hospital. AFter that, he would panic during an attack, which of course made it 10x worse. Now he has learned to relax after lots of reassurance from paediatricians. I think the psychology of asthma is overlooked.

Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?

My son swims very well, which helps him, in his words "clear out his pipes." grin
In an attack, we ask him to visualise swimming his favourite stroke and breath in that rhythm, which helps him concentrate and not panic.

How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? I nag. grin

How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? I don't. He has been on inhalers since he turned 4, and is now 12, so he does have his own routine. Plus at 12, he needs to be responsible for his own meds. Last year taught him that.

Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here. Nagging.

When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? January, at our request. Previously: October. But not sucessful.

How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?
We were reviewed in October by Asthma clinic nurse. We raised concerns that DS's meds were no longer effective, and said how often he was needing ventolin. the advice given was to use his spacer, but really that did not help. After seeing the nurse practitioner for a chest infection and related asthma attacks in December, we finally asked her to review him (she is awesome) and she recommended a change in meds in January. SInce then....no wheeze, no tightness, no ventolin!

Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not? have asked about combinations of medicines and about dosage of prednisilone when the amount given at hospital seemed very high.

shrinkingnora Tue 10-Apr-12 12:59:46

How well controlled is your child's asthma? Very but it has taken five years of persistent coughs, chest xrays and inhaler trials to get here

How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? Very well now.

Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms? Being calm and aware and having a clear idea of what to do when symptoms start

How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? I let her take a great deal of (secretly supervised) responsibilty for it. She likes to do her peak flow and fill in the chart.

How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? It has become part of routine but it is always obvious if she hasn't taken it.

Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here. We make getting a good peak flow reading a challenge - she knows that without regular inhaler use she won't get a good reading.

When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? 3 months ago but we are due another one to report back on the success of the inhalerts/

How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Useful but not as useful as then next one will be. Why? Our GP is excellent and very clear about what he is dooing and why re drugs.

Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? I would because we often ask the local pharmacist for advice and always find him to be extremely knowledgable and sensible. He is also very good at saying when he thinks we should go to the GP instead!

JustHecate Tue 10-Apr-12 13:10:20

~ How well controlled is your child's asthma? How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms? very well controlled. He copes fine. No techniques

~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here. I tell him he has to. It's not really a democracy in this house grin

~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why? he has an annual review. They're not really helpful. I don't learn anything I didn't already know, and he doesn't care

~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not? no. I've been asthmatic since I was a child. I don't really need any advice on it.

JustHecate Tue 10-Apr-12 13:13:37

by that I meant I have a lot of experience and understanding to help my child.

DS's asthma is very very mild..

~ How well controlled is your child's asthma? How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?

He copes fine and it is very well controlled (exercise induced, mainly in cold weather) - since he has never had a full-blown attack he is slow to recognise that (for example) the inhaler kept at school is running on empty, and I wish they did (or we could get - maybe they do?) salbutamol inhalers with counters like I have on Seretide.

~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here.

I tell him to grin - and point out the causal relationship between him running out of breath/ getting shouted at for not keeping up in PE and him forgetting to take his inhaler. That is the limit of my control since he only needs it at school

~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?

He hasn't had one yet (~18mths from diagnosis) - thanks for the reminder. However, since I am asthmatic I don't think I will learn a huge amount, although the asthma specialist practice nurse is very knowledgeable.

~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?

No - because we collect prescriptions from the dispensary in the GP surgery (rural practice) so the opportunity doesn't really arise.

BeerTricksPott3r Tue 10-Apr-12 13:29:41

~ How well controlled is your child's asthma? How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms? Fairly well controlled now (he's 9), although it was very uncontrolled in the early days (7mnth - 4yrs). Lots of hospital admissions. He has always coped very well with symtoms and recognised when he needs to rest. He is still a little reserved about it at school and has come home wheezy because he didn't like to 'bother' the teacher.
~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here. We have always told him his inhaler is to help him feel better and breathe easier. When he got older we described how both the Preventer and Reliever work in different ways and why it's important to use the former correctly even when he is not wheezy. When he was smaller we gave Teddy an inhaler through the Spacer when DS was reluctant to use it. We also used the Reliever while he was asleep when his asthma was bad, to cut down on the amount of sleep lost
~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why? last Year (June) with the Asthma Nurse at GP surgery. We find this very helpful and she has always talked to DS as much as possible rather than us, to give him 'ownership' of his condition and include him in treatment reviews.
~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?
No, with the amount of experience we have with DS's asthma we don't feel a pharmacist could be of any further help. They have also queried prescriptions in the past and contradicted the advice of the Consultant he was under, which we feel was wrong of them.

~ How well controlled is your child's asthma? How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?
Seems OK currently, but he's only 2 and has had an inhaler since his 1st birthday. But no actual diagnosis because he's too young... hmm

~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here.
Pin him down and force it on him? Seriously it was like that to start with (we just use the reliever before bed and before exercise/as needed during). He's much better now and will happily just sit on my knee while I do it. He likes to "help" press it down and "counts" along with me while I count his breaths.

~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?
He has never had a review. We got the inhaler after his neonatal consultant wrote to the GP and told her to prescribe it. We have had no further contact from anyone, despite asking about seeing the asthma nurse, because he's "too young to have asthma". We're due to see his consultant again in a couple of weeks, and I'll speak to her again, as she's been the most use so far!

~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?
I haven't because we've done OK so far muddling along. But I would be happy to ask for advice if I felt I needed to, I bother them about all sorts of things on a regular basis grin

~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?
*Actually, that's a fib - I have asked for advice, when the inhaler and spacer were first prescribed I had to ask the pharmacist what to do with it, how the spacer worked, and what dose he should have, as I had literally no idea and the GP hadn't bothered to talk to me about any of it - she was very reluctant to prescribe the inhaler at all and it was all a bit of a nightmare. But once we had it and knew what we were doing (more or less) DS suddenly started sleeping better, was less grumpy during the day, coughed a lot less etc etc.

Ours too was very young when prescribed asthma medication, aged one. I say 'prescribed medication' as they didn't actually commit to a diagnosis for the distressing breathing difficulties. We keep the heating on to keep the house warm through the night, as the cold air triggers it.

Nursery was a real help with taking the inhaler. Luckily we were given a really good compact spacer with illustrations of toys so she treated it as hers. Nursery sat the children around in a circle and used it to help with counting practice. For some this might be off-putting but it made my DD feel very special and proud of herself. My mum is a nurse and she also helped by whispering the count in DD's ear on her lap.

Not so much a review of her 'asthma' but it gets looked at every time she has a chest infection of horrible cough, which thankfully is less frequent as she gets older. We were told from the start that it may or may not turn out to be 'permanent' asthma, as there is a lot of cross over when babies have recurring bronchiolitis and related illnesses.

I have never considered speaking to a pharmacist about it. I can't put my finger on why - just no need to? Or a feeling that this is so serious for a very young child so I should only speak to a doctor?

~ How well controlled is your child's asthma? How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?

DD has mild asthma, which we tend only to have to treat when she gets unwell with something else. Her main symptom is coughing and wheezing at night, which does affect how well she sleeps, so we keep on top of it by beginning her brown inhaler the minute she shows any signs of an upper respiratory virus. We tend to encourage her to sleep in a more reclined position as she also has chronic rhinitis which can mean she's struggling to breathe all night, and this lessens those symptoms. It does also affect her energy levels, so she can tire more quickly sometimes, I have to watch for dark circles and general listlessness, and then go easy on what I expect from her.

~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here.

When she was little I used to pretend it was a trumpet and she had to play music on it. Now she is the one who reminds me she needs to take it, as it is part of a well set routine we have. The school give her a sticker when she's had her inhalers there, I had to write them a letter and give them their own supply of medication/spacer, and I tend to send in a communication book with a note each day that she needs her inhaler.

~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?

She saw a specialist about allergies a few months ago, he also advised me on how to treat her asthma, along with eczema and the rhinitis. He was quite helpful and put my mind at ease.

~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?

I would usually check whether or not they are okay to have a new medication, as I know some can affect asthmatics, and I tend to trust a pharmacists knowledge when it comes to medication, whereas I know sometimes my doctor forgets to ask whether I take anything else to check for interactions, and I don't like to always bother him when I am seeing the pharmacist any way to pick up the medication.

orangina Tue 10-Apr-12 14:27:32

Ok, here goes:

~ How well controlled is your child's asthma? How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?

I would say that DS's asthma is fairly well controlled. He may still grow out of it (he is 5 now) and our trips to a+e have certainly lessened over the years. I am better at spotting a cough/wheeze that is likely to turn into an attack and to give him his inhaler before it turns into a crisis (at which point he suddenly really doesn't want it.... I think it is related to having the spacer put over his nose when he is having trouble breathing, it is somehow counter intuitive to cover your face when you are struggling for breath.....)

~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here.

He is pretty good at taking his inhaler when he needs to, as he knows it will make him feel better. He has even asked for his inhaler on occasion when he can tell he has a cough that is bothering him re: his breathing. If he doesn't want to take his inhaler, I often put him on my lap in front of the television and we can get it into him then. As soon as he is out of the crisis zone, he doesn't mind doing the inhaler. If absolutely necessary, I just pin him down (!), but if he gets v upset it has a negative impact on his breathing anyway, so that's why I try and get it in him sooner rather than later (and avoid the upset). He can't yet do the inhaler by himself (not quite strong enough to push down the canister to deliver a proper dose....)

~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?

He saw a consultant last summer when we realised he had a peanut allergy too. The two may or may not be linked, but in the event of ingesting any peanut, we have to give him a dose of steroids to avoid the "perfect storm" (consultant's words) of a subsequent asthma attack on top of an allergic reaction. So, very useful. I take all the gear away with us in case of an incident and feel fairly confident I could deal with it all if necessary.

~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?

My local pharmacy is just brilliant and the pharmacist is fantastic (he helped me when dd was a tiny baby and I had a ghastly burn incident with her). I wouldn't hesitate to ask him if I needed help that I couldn't get elsewhere at the time, but I can't imagine a scenario with ds where I might need their help, re: advice.

I hope that helps!

GangstaGranny Tue 10-Apr-12 14:36:14

How well controlled is your child's asthma?
DD is 9. Was finally diagnosed 2 years ago after about 5 year history of to and fro from drs complaining of coughing+++ worse at night and being fobbed of with the viral answer. Was eventually given ventolin inhaler age 6 but only got diagnosis in year 2 when became so SOB and wheezy that ended up on oral prednisolone. Was not offered any follow up and ultimately returned to drs 2 weeks later in tears as so exhausted with deteriorating nights. Now have steroid inhaler so am pretty on top of things but have generally been met with an assumption that I should know how to manage symptoms and been given almost no education type support (am a HCP with moderate knowledge of asthmaso not sure if nurses just assumed I knew)

How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms?
DD is pretty mild and knows inhalers work so generally manages well. Three main problems have been DD to shy to tell different teacher that she needs to get inhaler from bag so sent for glass of water instead; DD raising hand to ask to get inhaler from bag and teacher being busy so telling DD to wait (teacher didn't realise what DD needed, DD became v. upset, teacher agreed that if DD needed inhaler in future then to just go and get it without asking); DD feeling embarrased about using inhaler in front of other kids, resolved with breath activated inhaler so not using spacer any more so less obtrusive.

Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?
Gradually picking up hints on inhaler use. Generally symptoms helped by DDs swimming (club level, pretty good for her age)

How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler?
DD very good at taking blue inhaler when at school as knows it helps. Got good routine with peak flow then steroid inhaler before teeth cleaning so even when DD on Brownie Pack Holiday still keeps up with routine.

How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not?
I usually hear DD take inhaler as uses spacer so can hear from kitchen. In yr 3 TA wrote in coniact book every time DD used ventolin at school. In yr 4 had no feedback from school until bad week last term when had note about her using inhaler several times per day every day that week. It was helpful to know so I simply thanked the TA wth a note back to let them know what measures we had in place to try and combat it from our end. Very often I can tell with good old maternal instinct when she's not right so I ask and she tells!

Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here. Not really I'm afraid. A nice bag for her to carry her ventolin inhaler when she goes out helps

When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?
Last review was insisted upon after I called the GP to find out how much I could increase her steroid inhaler by (had forgotten to shut bedroom window on misty night, on going misty weather, peak flow in boots and not improving with double dose. Saw asthmas nurse who accused me of over reacting to peak flows because she was basing levels by the book (should be max of 190)whereas I was going on DDs usualy normal (250, she swims if you recall). All told, I didn't really feel we gained anything at all from that review. Seeing a new asthma nurse in 2 days time and have more faith as met this nurse for my smear, mentioned DDs issue with using inhaler and with given easi-breathe by her. Need to see her as DDs peak flows not been right since february and can't do anything with them!

Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?
Not really asked pharmacist for advice as I work in a hospital so generally discuss any problems with paed nurse I know very well. Not sure I'd think about talking to pharmacist though but can't really justify that statement!

thereonthestair Tue 10-Apr-12 15:08:34

How well controlled is your child's asthma?

Currently well. It took a few months to get there though with the help of a very good asthma nurse in the childrens outpatient department. However DS was prem and had a respitory paed from birth which helped (as far as asthma is concerned)

How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms?

Ok now its controlled, the inhalers work well, now we have the right one, DS who is 2 will take them when he's ill. When he's not he's a sod but then again he is 2

Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?

DS has had lung disease since he was born. It's part of life for him. However the asthma nurse showed us various techniques to get him to take the inhaler.

Initially as a baby she told us to try and give him the inhaler in the high chair which worked, and to count, and smile. DS therefore knows when the inhaler will be finisihed.

We also sing (another tip from the nurse)

and now get DS to push the end in himself so he feels like he is taking some control (a tip from nursery)

we never fight him, and come back if DS is being 2 and refusing. Patience is a virtue

* How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? *

He's 2 he has no choice

How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? He's 2 we give it to him

* Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here.* see above about singing, counting and psuhing buttons. Also we have never given DS his inhaler in the buggies as we want to keep that as a safe space.
* When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional?* about 3 months ago, another one coming up in June.

* How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?*

Extremely as the paed listens to us, and looks at the bigger picture of a complex prem child with parents with too much to do who need to cut down on meds, (given the demands of the other conditions DS suffers from)

Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not? Not about asthma as such. And that's because even the GP sends DS to the paeds with his hisotry. However the pharamacist is great for sourcing meds, different doses etc for DS and even got us a sorted with a hospital prescription for Motenlukast after phoning round every Pharamcy in the coty. The pharmacist is brill, and a vital part of the team, but not for advice.

PuzzleRocks Tue 10-Apr-12 15:45:06

DD1 is 13 days shy of 5. She copes very well now that she is on medication. At 2 she had a number of serious hospital admissions and I had to really stamp my feet to get proper treatment for her.

I administer her inhaler and her teacher and teaching assistant are well versed in the signs. She takes her preventer at breakfast and before bed and asks for her reliever when need, no encouragement necessary. Given that she has started young I would imagine this routine is ingrained so things wont change much as she gets older.

She gets a review every six months or sooner if an attack necessitates. The consultant Paed has changed since she first started treatment. She is very good and thorough and I feel that DD1 is in good hands. She is professional but capable of genuine empathy too for which I am grateful. I have sobbed in her office.

Never considered talking to a pharmacist because I have put my faith in the hospital but now you have me wondering.

Julezboo Tue 10-Apr-12 16:00:54

How well controlled is your child's asthma?
Not very atm, though only recently diagnosed

How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms?
He seems to complain he is tired in his chest when he is suffering.

Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?
I try to get him to rest a while, watch a DVD, play DS etc..

~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler?
Doesnt need encouraging tbh, he has his orange one morning and night and blue one as and when throughout the day.

How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not?
When his breathing is a funny gaspy noise.

Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here.
Stickers on spacer, put their fave TV programme on, pretend to use it yourself, I have spacers within reach of my 4 year old so he is used to it being round and often has a play with it. He also has one at school.

~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?
Jan, due another one on 19th apr. We see an asthma nurse which i found helpful.

~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?
Never have, never thought to have tbh, wouldnt think they were qualified for it?

Abra1d Tue 10-Apr-12 16:32:40

~ How well controlled is your child's asthma? How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?
Pretty well controlled. It is rare for me to hear them coughing--unless there is a sudden change in weather/pollen levels/virus. I expect them to have a grip on their asthma control and they know they can expect a hard time from me if they are careless. They also both like sport and this tends to encourage good management.

~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here.
They are used to taking their Ventolin everywhere and it's the last thing they each check in the morning before leaving the house. I've never had to remind them why it matters: they both remember the ghastly coughing fits they had before they were diagnosed.

~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?
They attend an annual asthma clinic and so both would have had a review within the last year, probably within the last eight months. We never miss the check-up. I find it reassuring to get a weight and height check and peak-flow and it's good to have a reminder of the best technique for using inhalers.

~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?
I certainly would if, for instance, it was the weekend and our GP surgery was closed as it usually is. They wouldn't have the children's health records to hand, though, which might mean they wouldn't know all the facts about the seasonal triggers.

LackaDAISYcal Tue 10-Apr-12 17:57:30

I'm answering this for DS1, 10 who was diagnosed at 18 months.

~ How well controlled is your child's asthma?

At the moment It is under control, but he is slipping with his preventer again so we need to step It up now hayfever season is upon us.

How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms?

He panics if he has an attack, so our aim is to stop him from getting to that stage. He is getting better at recognising when he needs to use his reliever.

Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?

Not really

~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler?
We tell him rather than encourage tbh, otherwise he doesn't take his preventer and things get bad again.
How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not?
By watching him, tis the only way.

Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here. "Take your inhalers, or you will end up back in hospital and have to take steroids again" is all the motivation he needs grin

~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional?
Around 15 months ago, it is overdue blush

How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review?
Very useful as the asthma nurse gave us strategies for increasing his dose when he has a cold, and let us know the max. dose of ventolin we could give him short term.

~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma?
Haven't but there's no particular reason other than I didn't realise they could. I would ask them now however, If I couldn't get an appointment with my GP.

How well controlled is your child's asthma? How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?

Both of my children have asthma, and it is well controlled now, but this has not been the case in the past. I struggled to get inhalers from the GP, and was met by a stonewalling technique of "viral wheeze" for about a year before getting any sort of recognition of the real issue.

They both cope quite well with their symptoms. When they get wheezy they tell me that they need their puffers.

How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here.

Initially we were encouraged to let the children play with the spacers so that they got used to them. These days though, they take them happily as they know what tends to happen if they don't keep up with the preventer inhaler (hospital). I monitor it by watching them, as they are too young really (3 and 6) to do it alone. I tend to count the breaths down, and if they are resisting, using the inhaler on a toy first sometimes helps.

When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?

We have reviews every 3 months with the asthma nurse at the surgery. The last one was 4 weeks ago and I find them to be not very useful. I find that we get conflicting advice from the nurses and the GP (being told by the nurses to change the Beclometasone dose as and when we need to, and then being told that this is a bad thing to do by the GP). My children are too young for a peak flow meter, so it generally becomes a case of yes/no/weigh/measure/goodbye.

Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?

I haven't, but this is simply because it has not been convenient. I have always needed a prescription when speaking to a GP, but if the pharmacist were available and able to discuss the asthma, then this may be a possibility. However, our pharmacy is crowded, small, and an unpleasant place to be.

SooFrustrated Tue 10-Apr-12 20:39:35

~ How well controlled is your child's asthma? DS age 11, Asthma is very well controlled with blue inhaler not needed more than once a month usually.

How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? Copes ok, knows that to keep control he must take preventative inhaler everyday and recognises his symptoms easily when chest feels tight. Cold damp weather makes things worse but we increase the dose of preventative inhaler in the autumn through to the better weather to avoid problems.

Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms? Haven't really needed too over and above advice provided by asthma nurse.

~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? Mostly nagging but trying now to leave him to it, with reminders every other day, as has been on a couple of school trips recently and had to take responsibility himself. He can be pretty lax about carrying an inhaler because he doesn't need it often.

How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? Usually see him taking it, if not I will ask him

Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? Just nagging
If so, please do share them here.

~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why? GP sends an annual invite for review with an asthma nurse which is always very useful. They explain directly to DS why he needs inhalers, how they work etc. They are also great at checking his technique to make sure he's getting the full dose. It gives me reassurance that we are doing the right thing.

~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not? Would be happy to talk to pharmacist out of GP hours but haven't really needed to.

Only other comment I have is in relation to the school. I know teachers are happy to remind children to take inhalers, but I'm not sure they would recognise an asthma attack in good time to take speedy action. I would have been quite nervous about sending DS to school if it had not been so well controlled, especially when he was very young.

FrankWippery Tue 10-Apr-12 21:08:50

~ How well controlled is your child's asthma? How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?

Three of my four children have/had asthma. DD1 appears to have grown out of it completely (she's now 18). She had two bad attacks when she was 6/7 which panicked her at the time, but we were taught some good techniques to help prevent/reduce severity.

DD2 (17) has mild to moderate asthma and is also a dreadful hayfever sufferer. She manages her asthma with preventers during the (long for her) hayfever season and occasionally needs her reliever at other times.

DD3 (3) has very recently been diagnosed with asthma. She spent a week in hospital two months ago with a bout of pneumonia which was coupled with several asthma attacks requiring quite severe medical assistance - perm oxygen and hourly nebs for 5 days. She was surprisingly good at coping, though I suspect this was because she was too poorly to give a damn... Bit too early with techniques for her as she is so young.

~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here.

DDs 1 & 2 manage/managed their own inhalers themselves.

DD3 is getting quite good with her inhalers. She needs preventatives twice a day and, at the moment, she's having relievers once daily. It's still a game with her, she pretends she's playing a trumpet and is almost able to 'do' it herself. Monitoring is not really needed as she is so young, so I am in charge...

~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?

DDs 1 & 2 don't have any monitoring to speak of anymore. DD2 sees the asthma nurse once a year, but that is it really

DD3 has been to the hospital today to see her consultant. This is the second appointment since her discharge 7 weeks ago. Very useful as he explained things that I was unsure of. I am not massively happy about her having steroids daily, but he has explained the whys and wherefores in much better detail for me. He x-rayed her just to make sure the previous infection has cleared (it has) and will review her again in 3 months

~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?

I did, years ago, when DD2 was poorly. At the moment, with DD3, I would be unlikely to see a pharmacist, until I am more comfortable with helping my daughter manage - it is still very early days and she is a much more severe asthmatic than the other two girls

trixymalixy Tue 10-Apr-12 21:14:07

~ How well controlled is your child's asthma? Reasonably well with the brown inhaler, only really needing the blue if he has a cold

How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? Fine, he will tell nursery if he needs his inhaler. Being in hospital was pretty distressing though.

Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms? Not really

~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? He's only 5, so we tell him he hasto have his inhaler.

How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? I give it to him, so no need to monitor yet.

Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? We used to pretend that it made a darth vader noise!

~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why? He is seen every 3 months. I find it a bit of a waste of time tbh. They just ask me if I think his level of medication is working and ask us to demonstrate inhaler technique.

~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not? I would be happy talking to a pharmacist, but so far the consultant and GP have answered all the question I have had.

Mitasuki Tue 10-Apr-12 21:17:13

~ How well controlled is your child's asthma?
better now he has inhaler for attacks.
he has allergys which trigger his astma as well as cold/flu.
How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms?
well i know when his wheeze is bad and he has started asking for his breathing thing. at first every cold he had or start of one i was up the doctors asking them to check him but they would say its just a cold, took a trip to a&e when he was almost blue, 4 hours after leaving the doctors who said it was cold, for them to say it was astma. very strange to see a toddler playing smileing wheezing and blue, one of the other parents insisted they look at my child before theres they were so concerned by the sound.

Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?
my son is happy to try and press the spray down being three we supervise but he some how knew from being a tiny that it helps when he hurts. theres a great book about inhalers for kids that he thought was funny. Why Is It So Hard to Breathe?: A First Look at...Asthma (First Look at Books)

~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler?
when its needed now he dose not need much incurace ment when he was smaller one of us had to hold hime while the other gave him the inhaler. having the spacer helps.

How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not?
Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here.
he cant just take it we have to give it to him but its easy to get when needed we watch the spacer in between puffs to see that hes breathing it through.

~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?
Last review was in january when the doctor checked his cheast and said he sould not have astma much longer, has he had a cold lately... yes oh then most that sound must be that then. grrrr. last time we went was aparently 2 years ago, im sure we were there more recently, must have had refills from the hospital then. they grudgingly gave him repeat perscription. we have yet to see a astma nurse.
~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?
only when getting treatments for other things such as head lice or chickenpox. was told to check with lice killer as some have alcohol in them.

hellhasnofurylikeahungrywoman Tue 10-Apr-12 21:39:35

How well controlled is your child's asthma?

Pretty poorly. Her asthma symptoms often exceed her safe dosage. This has led to problems with her adrenal glands in the past.

How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms?

Extremely well, she has never let it hold her back, she's a swimmer at county level and has competed in triathlons for the region.

Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?

I'm asthmatic, my DS is also asthmatic I think we've just tried to make them see that lots of famous people have asthma and provided they are sensible they can do anything they want to do.

How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler?

Her symptoms mean she regulates her self, she knows that without her meds she'll be in hospital.

How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not?

I don't need to now but when she was small it was just a part of our daily routine. Get dressed, breakfast, peak flow readings, inhalers, teeth. Then at night time bath, peak flow readings, inhalers, teeth, bed.

Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here.

No real tips it was just what we did every day.

When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?

Last review was three weeks ago with her consultant, very useful as they've suggested a new regime and will start her on new antibiotics very soon.

Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?

Not really, her asthma is very difficult to manage so we usually rely on the consultant, the GP often asks the hospital for advice as she is following an unusual medication regime.

HavePatience Tue 10-Apr-12 21:57:07

I have a 3 and a half year old with asthma.

~ How well controlled is your child's asthma? How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?

It is mostly controlled. He copes ok. I am a wreck because I ad it as a child and remember the horror of not being able to catch a breath. I try to keep his mouth covered in cold weather and use a humidifier and air purifier in his room for sleeping. I put him in bed between us when it gets bad at night so we can monitor him and treat immediately.

~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here.

He takes his inhaler without fuss because he knows it helps him. Peppa and George stuffed pigs also have asthma at our house and need puffs through theirs (an old chamber and empty inhaler case) each day. He watches their symptoms closely grin

~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?

It took ages to get a diagnosis. It is still a constant battle. I am told he will outgrow it soon and to wait it out. I'd like them to spend a night with him when it's bad.

~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?

Yes, and I often do at our local pharmacy. They give me better tips and advice than my GP and paediatrician.

HavePatience Tue 10-Apr-12 22:00:12

*had

LackaDAISYcal Tue 10-Apr-12 22:19:53

God, yes Mitasuki, having to hold down a screaming toddler sad
We've just got through that with DS2, e,who got his inhalers 6 months ago.

CheesyPotatoes Tue 10-Apr-12 23:18:15

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

starlingsintheslipstream Wed 11-Apr-12 00:09:52

How well controlled is your child's asthma?

Pretty good now. After a couple of admissions to hospital with severe attacks, two years or so ago, she was invited on an asthma trial. Her medication was changed - she's now on Flixotide and we were given more information about using salbutamol as a preventative measure and she is coping fine at the moment.

How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler?

It has just become routine. She takes the Flixotide am and pm when she brushes her teeth usually. Sometimes I suspect she does forget as I can tell from her accuhaler how many doses she's had but certainly not for any sustained length of time.

When did your child last have a review with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?

She had a review with the asthma nurse at the surgery about six months ago as part of her repeat prescription malarkey. It wasn't particularly useful but then she's not been having trouble so it was just a routine appointment.

Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so why? If not, why not?

I haven't. Pharmacies round here always seem really busy. And our local Boots one, where unfortunately I seem to have got embroiled in a repeat prescription scheme with, can barely get my daughter's prescription ready when they say they will, so I can't be faffed to waste any more of my time in there asking advice. I have noticed the posters at the Lloyds pharmacy about asthma advice but the environment isn't conducive to be asking health advice, in my opinion. It just feels like shop counter, not a surgery.

shopster Wed 11-Apr-12 09:26:57

My DS (11) has asthma. He has a both a preventer(brown) & reliever (blue) inhaler. I ensure he takes the preventer daily - we notice the difference if he misses it for a few days.
He plays a lot of sport & we encourage him to have a go at everything. He knows that his inhaler is in his pocket at all times and will use it if he feels out of breath.
He is able to recognise the signs himself now - it just takes time sad
When he is short of breath at home, i will take over with the administering of the inhaler. We use an aerochamber and generally this works well. Telltale signs for us are the hunched shoulders, clearing of the throat, sniffing a lot.
We have a review every 6 months. Happy with this. Would be happy to speak to our pharmacist about his asthma. They are friendly & always take a minute or two to explain your prescriptions.

SpitSpot Wed 11-Apr-12 10:56:55

How well controlled is your child's asthma? How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?
It is well controlled, he uses his preventer daily and rarely has to use his blue inhaler - it tends to be seasonal with hay fever and leaf mould seasons so we are more alert to it at these times

~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here.
He is 11 so generally manages it himself. He has had an inhaler since he was 2 so he has never known any different, it is part of our daily routine - always does the preventer before he cleans his teeth morning and evening

~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?
Last month - he has an annual review, it has been more useful in the past when his asthma was worse. It is useful just to have confirmation that we are managing it effectively

~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?
No I have not. It has never come up, also because the asthma medication is prescribed by a doctor, it seems more logical to talk to them about it

~ How well controlled is your child's asthma? How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?
DS only gets wheezy when he has a cold or in cold weather, then he remembers to take his brown inhaler morning and night, and brings a blue inhaler to school.
~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here.
We ask him if he's done his inhaler, and DD says if he's been lying.
~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?
He goes to asthma clinic once a year to review his medication. It's no bother, they tend to keep it the same.
~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?
The pharmacist usually looks busy and harrassed when we see her, so, no, I wouldn't add to her workload.

weblette Wed 11-Apr-12 16:50:21

~ How well controlled is your child's asthma? How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?

Ds's asthma is usually well-controlled but due to its nature (virally triggered) can have flare-ups. He knows when's it's coming on, we deal with it as necessary. We don't do daily peak flows but having a meter at home helps us judge when he needs stronger intervention.

~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here.

Ds has used an inhaler from very young and has always been good about doing it. When he's in distress we use the full spacer and mask to make it easier, he's working on the techniue for the smaller chamber. When he was little the sticker books were out in force - he decorated everything to his tastes. When his asthma was finally diagnosed as such he acquired a new bear who needed to use a 'puffer' too. Because we've always discussed it with him, he knows when he needs it.

~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?

Two months ago with our fabulous practice nurse. She's completely up-to-date on the latest asthma protocols and mentions anything new so we can discuss if we needs to modify what we do with ds. I know I can reach her very easily, the surgery will always get her to call me straight back if ds needs anything and as she is now able to prescribe without the GP, she covers every possible service we might need.

~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?

No because the asthma nurse is as easy for me to access as the local pharmacy.

cather Wed 11-Apr-12 19:18:22

How well controlled is your child's asthma? Very well controlled with the brown inhaler.

How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? Now that it has settled down he manages really well.

Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms? Rather than telling him to stop running around I suggest we watch TV or draw so that he has to sit still.

How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? He takes it every morning when I take mine so it is just part of the normal morning routine

How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? We take it together so it is easy to monitor

Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here. We take ours together and have just made it part of the daily routine.

When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why? We have six monthly reviews and the last was about 4 months ago. I always find them useful.

Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not? I have had asthma since I was small and my son has had it since he was tiny so we have seen lots of doctors and specialists so I have never even thought of asking a pharmacist for advice.

~ How well controlled is your child's asthma? How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?

For DD1, 'under control' means less than 3 trips to A & E in a 3 month period, so it's fairly well under control at the moment.

She has silent asthma, and atypical presentation. She knows that when her heart is racing she is having an asthma attack.

~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here.

DD1 is 5 years old, so she has adults who do it with her.

~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?

DD1 see the respiratory consultant at Children's Hospital every 3 months, and the asthma nurse in between these times. She goes through a whole set of tests and her medication is reviewed, however it's a balancing act between ensuring that she isn't taking too much steroids, but keeping her asthma under control, as if it isn't, she has to to take even more steroids!

~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?

Absolutely not, at least not for a child, and especially not one who is already under a respiratory specialist as without all her history, it would be guess work.

Catsycat Wed 11-Apr-12 20:39:07

How well controlled is your child's asthma?
Reasonably good now, unless she has a cold or other infection. She hasn't had to be admitted to hospital for at least 3 years.

How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms?
She is very brave about any type of pain / medical treatment, as she has had eczema, asthma and food allergies from about 6 months old, so is used to the various symptoms / treatment etc. She tends to become listless and quiet rather than distressed, so it is important for us to keep an eye on that in case she is more ill than she seems - last winter she had pneumonia, but hardly complained at all. She will come and tell us if she needs her reliever.

Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?
We have encouraged her to take part in activities such as swimming and dance, which may or may not have helped, but in any case we have not let her feel excluded from physical activities by her asthma. Other than that, just being sympathetic and letting her rest when she doesn't feel well seems to help.

How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here.
She is only 4 1/2 so takes the inhaler through a spacer with an adult - she therefore has no choice but to take it. She is so used to taking the inhaler (she has had it for 4 years), that it is just part of life for her.

When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?
We see a paediatrician every 6 months. He encourages us to try reducing the preventer every so often, then we discuss what happened at the next appointment. It is of limited use, because we would try to reduce the dose ourselves anyway, and how successful this is depends on whether she gets a cold, and seasonal factors (weather etc). Generally, we will reduce the dose for however long it is before she gets the next cold, then we end up having to put her back on it again.

Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?
This has never occurred to me, because I view asthma as a specialised area, and I wouldn't expect a pharmacist to have the specialised knowledge of symptoms etc that a doctor has. Also, the medicines are prescription only, so I would expect to have to see a doctor to get them.

AliceL Wed 11-Apr-12 21:44:49

Does not really fit your questions but my baby was diagnosed at 10 months and trying to get a small baby to take an inhaler - even with a space with baby pictures on it is not easy and he gets more distressed as we try to use it. Any ideas for a better set up for home use - he also hated the mask and noisy oxygen in hospital - so something quiet and not so constricting on his face would be good. I know I may be asking the impossible but I also have asthama and I worry that if he gets worse we won;t be getting enough medication to him in time.

Snowballed Wed 11-Apr-12 22:24:35

How well controlled is your child's asthma? How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?

Reasonably. DD is 4.10 & has brown steroid inhaler twice a day - supplemented by blue as & when reliever needed. Was diagnosed when nearly 3, as a side effect of Pectus carinatum.

Great tip/technique I use - In winter I always send her out with a scarf wrapped round her mouth - school do it too. It warms the air up that she breathes in and seems to really reduce the coughing.

~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler?

Set times (i.e. on waking & before bed)

How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here.

I get her to do the counting between puffs - works now she's 4 but I'm guessing that at 8 or so, the novelty will have worn off.

~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?

We know she will have it quite a while as its linked to underlying condition - which is monitored by GP. Don't specifically review asthma

~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?

yes - they've given some good tips. i.e leave 30 seconds between puffs as more effective and that the brown inhaler leaves reside on throat so always have a glass of water for her to sip on afterwards.

ettiketti Wed 11-Apr-12 22:48:52

~ How well controlled is your child's asthma? How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?
Asthma very well controlled, she copes well with the symptoms and manages her inhalers extremely well. We were told at a very young age (<12months) that she was asthmatic, so she's grown.up with it and around family members with it, so its second nature now, aged 9.

~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here.
Initially, as a babe in arms, it was hellish, involving huge Volumatic spaces and a headlock!!! Once we were give the aerochambers it was much easier. Decorating them with stickers helped but really, she soon worked out the inhalers helped her feel better and the struggles stopped. Her technique has been checked frequently and is excellent and she takes her preventors consistently.

~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?
Every year with GP practice asthma nurse. It's been useful as her asthma triggers were not clear and seemed to change. It's useful to talk things through with someone who deals with more than just my child so has a wealth of experience. We have altered the regime from time to time to suit under the.nurses close guidance.

~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not? I'd expect a pharmacist to know about the treatment.but not the disease, if that makes sense. So whilst I'll always ask for medication advise, I'd not have thought to ask for management advise until now.

nickseasterchick Thu 12-Apr-12 00:01:56

~ How well controlled is your child's asthma?
Now almost 16 years after ds1 almost died from asthma and because of a very 'teen orientated' asthma nurse its the most under control its ever been.

How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms?

Ds1 until recently tended to wheeze and wheeze and then have to be cajoled into using his blue 'reliever' inhaler the brown 'preventer' was rarely used unless he was ill and then Id take over his asthma meds and follow the prescription.

Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?

Now after our fantastic asthma nurse drummed it into him that the brown one 'is his best mate' thats the way to look at it.

~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler?

I remind him of how bad he feels and how much easier it is to use the inhalers and remain asthma free.

How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not?

When he was younger it was a habit a routine and as often as he brushed his teeth he 'brown puffered' and blue puffered under supervision from an adult.

Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here

I used to say the medicine made him asthma free and filled his lungs with medicine almosr making the puffers the 'heros' and the wheeze the 'enemy'.

.
~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional?

In January and it was the best spent hour he ever had!!!

How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review?

The asthma nurse was really 'with it' with the teens,she knew the way to speak to him,the music he was into,even commented on his headphones her technique was fab and she was so on his level,she wasnt patronising or lecturing it was facts clear and simple.

Why
see above smile
~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?

Have done frequently and always found them to be full of great info and very supportive from taking a simple peak flow reading when hes been wheezy on holiday to supplying an emergency inhaler over Easter.

~ How well controlled is your child's asthma? How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?

Very well controlled - he only gets wheezy now during respiratory illnesses. We understand how and when to treat it and what to do.

~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here.

Only needs it now and then so not really relevant. By the time he needs it he's ill enough to put up with it.

~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?

A year ago, totally useless. Would have been a better spent hour playing in the park.

~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?

Never really considered it - he's only ever wheezy when very sick and is usually under the care of doctors or in hospital at that point.

After two or three hospital admissions and lots of interrogation the doctors finally admitted they were classing my dd as asthmatic. The early stages weren't very well controlled at all due to a severe lack of knowledge of what to be doing. Was basically given a blue in haler and told to use when needed. My dd's asthma is pretty much just viral induced . If she gets a cold it can go to her chest. These days it is pretty well controlled dd can tell me if she needs the in haler and does it herself. And if she's a bit dozy cos it's night time obviously I do it. To start with getting my then 2.5/3 yr old to take the inhaler was extremely hard and often traumatic. In hospital it took three nurses to help restrain her in order to do it although they did give her some god awful two part giant plastic spacer with a mouth piece as opposed to mask to see if that would be easier fir her. In the end we used the smaller ones with the mask on the end. At first it was a restrain job, guess as it wasn't an every day occurrence it took longer to get her used to it. Eventually bribery with buttons or cheerios worked and now it's no problem at all. As far as any referrals go we have had nothing, no real advice or suggestions and no brown inhaler just the blue. The diagnosis we only got cos I'd taken her to get the all clear after a chest infection as a friend with a severly asthmatic dc was due to visit and I wanted to make sure she wasnt contagious. It was then I was informed she was classed as asthmatic ( had I not taken her ......) the inhaler certainly helps as anything that helps avoid the need for the steroid tablets and antibiotic which sends her loopy is a god send. Never had any referrals or reviews or anything like that but that's probably cos it's not a daily thing. I don't tend to speak to anyone with regards to treatment as doctors never said that much do didn't think there was anything more I needed to know. Luckily as she gets older the incidents of needing it are getting less although winter with all the bugs it brings , can be quite a bad time.

Snooch Thu 12-Apr-12 10:42:13

~ How well controlled is your child's asthma?
Pretty well
~ How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms?
Not very well
~ Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?
The daily preventer helps enormously.
~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler?
My son is 5 and I administer the inhaler. He is very good in accepting it and realises that it helps him.
~ How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not?
As above - I administer the inhaler.
~ Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here.
It was very hard in getting him to accept the inhaler in the beginning (he was 2 when he first started using it) but as above, he now realises that it helps and has become part of our daily routine.
~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional?
The last time he was hospitalised for an attack - in October 2011
How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?
~ I found it helped as he was put on a preventer when he previously only had the reliever
~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?
Not really as I have always made a GP appointment when necessary and been assisted that way. I feel that for something this serious a GP visit is more appropriate and don't think that a pharmacist can really tell me any more than I already know - they would only direct me there anyway (as they often do with any other issues).

My son's asthma is only triggered by colds and flu so we find it easier to manage.

cowsaremyfavourite Thu 12-Apr-12 12:52:09

How well controlled is your child's asthma? How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?
Reasonably well controlled although he is unable to participate in any strenuous exercise eg cross country running even with the help of his brycanyl inhaler. My DS always takes his brycanyl turbohaler before any exercise and often during exercise especially when its cold and damp and he starts taking it 6hrly as soon as he gets any symptoms of a cold or a temperature or even diarrhoea and vomiting because all these things will cause his peak flow to drop. If his peak flow has not returned to normal within 10 - 14 days we now start him on a 5 day course of oral prednisolone otherwise he will not have sufficient reserves to fight the next infection/participate in sport in wet damp weather. We only use a large volumatic never the small one whose name I cant remember because research shows its not so effective.
*How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler?
How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here.*
My DS is now 13 he has been asthmatic, although not labelled as asthmatic until he was 1yrs old, since birth. I encourage him to take responsibility for his illness because I don't know how he feels. From a very early age he has known what treatment to take and when. He carries a brycanyl turbohaler with him at all times and uses as he feels it is necessary. He knows how much he can take and when to seek urgent and non urgent medical advise.
When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?
He's reviewed 4-6 monthly by a specialist paediatrician. I am always happy with the review because they monitor his symptom management/growth/and undertake respiratory studies etc.
Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?
I am a paediatric nurse with a particular interest in childhood asthma so don't feel a pharmacist would know any more than I do!! His asthma is quite severe and I feel it would be outside the scope of a pharmacist to manage it the GP does not wish to manage it!

BigBadBear Thu 12-Apr-12 14:03:18

~ How well controlled is your child's asthma? How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?

My 5yo DD1 has asthma (and I suspect my 2yo DD2 will be diagnosed with it next winter). Apart from one exacerbation just before her 3rd birthday, it is well controlled with just a regular preventer inhaler. We are good at picking up on when she needs to add in her reliever, so she hardly ever has to use it as rescue medication.

~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here.

When she was first diagnosed, DD1 used a spacer plus mask, and now uses just the spacer and inhaler. She is very competent at doing it (she listens for the spacer clicking so she knows it is working and counts the number of tidal breaths on her fingers) and can do so on her own, though I always supervise to make sure she does it correctly. She is motivated to do so by the memory of how bad she felt when she had her exacerbation, and by her own understanding of how quickly it can get bad and stop her doing the things she wants to do (generally running around like a 5yo grin). If things ever start slipping, I use stickers to encourage her. We have made the inhaler part of her toothbrushing routine, so she does it morning and evening and this also ensures any steroid residue is removed from her mouth and reduces the chance of her developing oral thrush.

~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?

She is reviewed once a year by the asthma nurse. It isn't terribly useful as I am a pharmacist, but is the only time she has her height checked because of the steroid inhaler, and her peak flow measured, so that is helpful. I wouldn't wait for the annula check if there was an issue, I would get it seen straightaway.

~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?

As I am a pharmacist, I don't tend to. But I would if I needed to.

Have learned loads just reading this thread.

CrunchyFrog Thu 12-Apr-12 18:55:18

How well controlled is your child's asthma? pretty well, steroid inhaler 2 puffs bd, blue when wheezy or night time cough.

How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? He's brilliant, is very good at knowing when he needs his reliever.

Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms? I have asthma, so know that remaining calm etc help - also, warm non-milky drinks and steamy rooms help me.

~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here. *He does not appear to need motivating, he's absolutely brilliant at doing it himself! I supervise, and he uses a spacer.

~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why? With the GP, about 2 weeks ago. Very useful, excellent advice and information and an offer of referral to a respiratory specialist.

~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not? Not really, as past experience has shown that they would just tell me to go to my GP!

TheSecondComing Thu 12-Apr-12 19:15:14

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

Tina2003 Thu 12-Apr-12 22:57:02

~ How well controlled is your child's asthma?
Both my chidlren, aged 13 and 8 suffered from asthma, it was pretty well controlled for both until 2 weeks ago when the oldest one had a very bad scare.

How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms?
They have both gotten pretty good and are very mature in dealing with symptoms etc.

Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?
I believe explaining to them what is happening and why the need for taking care of themselves is important

~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler?
Like another Mum said, I don't encourage I sit next to them and monitor it carefully that it is well done. This way I know when it has to be done and I am not prsent they know the correct way

Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here.
The onlt thing I always say is to remember what can happen if you don't, I know it is a scare tactic but works for me and them!

~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional?
Last review was 2 weeks ago.

How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?
I found it very useful, GP took her time and explained to my eldest what was happening, the consequences and treatment needed.

~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?
Not really, never thought about it. Maybe in the future.

watfordmummy Thu 12-Apr-12 23:18:31

~ How well controlled is your child's asthma? How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?

Ds2 is 9 now, and has had asthma since around 4, he has hayfever so his asthma is worse in the summer, and we brown inhaler then

~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here.

find it hard to make sure takes it, although as he has got older he can see the cause and effect of taking it, so is better now

~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?

he has an annual appointment at our GPs with the asthma nurse, which he found helpful, as she reviews they way he takes his inhaler to ensure as he is doing it more himself he is doing it correctly

~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?

as we need to get multiple inhalers at once (school likes to have spares) have sought advice for repeat prescriptions for them from our friendly pharmacist Ds2 and his friend used to have club asthma, which they saw as good as club penguin!, they didn't see having it as being bad, but as a badge of honour! grin

mrspnut Fri 13-Apr-12 19:20:05

~ How well controlled is your child's asthma? How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?
DD2's asthma is pretty well controlled using the preventer inhaler and only occasional use of her reliever inhaler. It tends to go to pot during the school holidays though and she has been more wheezy this week because our routine changes and her inhaler use becomes more sporadic.
~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here.
We have to remind her to use her preventer, and we do it for her, counting the breaths through the spacer ( she has the small Aerochamber). However, if I don't remember then it can be missed unless it is a school day when it is the routine. DD2 does know when she needs her reliever and will ask to have it both at home and at school.
~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?
Her last review was in January with the asthma nurse at the practice who is fab. She is very knowledgeable and gives us a lot of advice. It also helps that she is a mum at the school too so sees us most days.
~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?
I haven't bothered because our local Pharmacist looks about 12, and it is easier to have a quick word with the nurse or ring the surgery for the GP triage service instead.

zippy539 Fri 13-Apr-12 20:31:45

~ How well controlled is your child's asthma? How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms? Pretty well controlled at the moment - it seems to be getting easier as he gets older (diagnosed at 2, now 10). He hasn't had a hospital admission since he was 6. He copes well with symptoms - can identify the difference between an asthma cough and a regular one so not so much random inhaler use these days. Regular use of the brown inhaler especially during autumn/winter seems to help a lot.

~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here. DS hasn't ever need encouragement to use the inhaler - in fact left to his own devices he uses his blue inhaler far too much. It's quite hard to monitor if he's taking it/how much he's taking when he's out playing/at school - especially as dh is also asthmatic so we have loads of inhalers around the place!

~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why? I think it was about six months ago. Tbh I've never found the reviews hugely useful - they always seem quite vague without any concrete suggestions as to how to improve things. Perhaps that's the nature of asthma - different for everyone, but in the early days I would have liked more info at reviews about identifying triggers etc. Have learnt by trial and error but less 'error' would have been nice!

~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not? To be honest, no. I don't think it's ever occurred to me. The exception is when I'm getting meds for something else and I'm asked if ds has asthma because of contra-indications. Generally I've relied on GP and NHS24 for advice in scary situations. It's good to be reminded though that pharmacists can be used for health advice.

LineRunner Fri 13-Apr-12 21:05:06

How well controlled is your child's asthma? How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?
We are doing ok, DS was only diagnosed at age 13 last year. We learned a lot via MN threads, eg avoid Lynx type sprays etc!

How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here.
DS is old enough to accept a reminder in the morning to use reliever if he is coughing. We do not have a preventer.

When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?
GP appointment in December. She advised us to call the asthma clinic for an appointment if we were concerned, which seems fair.

Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?
No, this has never been suggested. I would consider it, if I thought it were appropriate, yes.

Ilovethedoctor Sat 14-Apr-12 00:35:45

Just a short note to Mums, if your child is prescribed Singulair thoroughly google it first.

God the side effects sound worse than problem they r designed to help. Thanks for the tip ilove !!!

theresafire Sat 14-Apr-12 09:04:19

No probs,

I mentioned it to a second paediatrician who recommened it for my DS. He went and googled and when I saw him the next day,
(hosp admission) he was quite surprised and said that now the actual Singulair website states suicidal ideation as a side effect.

No thanks, I'll stick with flixotide for now.

shock

theresafire Sat 14-Apr-12 09:05:21

Different pc different name, ha ha.

blush

Suicidal ideation???!!! Omg

magnolia74 Sat 14-Apr-12 11:25:57

How well controlled is your child's asthma? How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms?
Pretty well controlled. She has 2 pumps, one for daily use and one for symptom relief as well as a peak flow meter.

Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?
A cold is her main trigger so as soon as she feels poorly she increases her medication. We also monitor her peak flow.

~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler?
I don't need to, she is 8 and knows when she needs it.

How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not?
She keeps it downstairs so I always know when its being used

Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler?
If so, please do share them here.
Give them as much control as you can, most kids like a bit of control wink

~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional?
Last month

How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?
Slightly useful as we discuss if her medication is working ok.

~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?

No, i would prefer to talk to the Asthma Nurse or G.P as I feel they have had relevant training and have experience and knowledge to give advice.

~ How well controlled is your child's asthma? reasonably well, frequency of hospital admissions are reducing

How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms?*brilliantly. He's very matter-of-fact about it*

Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms? he gets rewarded after an episode - taken out for a treat, or a trip to a charity shop with a fiver to spend on whatever he likes. It's a reward for tolerating the treatment and to make up for whatever he's missed out on at the time"

~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? it's his Darth Vader Puffer - the spacer makes his breathing noisy so we say lines from the film. I'm a Star Wars geek...

How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? I turst him, he takes responsibility for it - he's six and is old enough t understand that it keeps him well

Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here. Use it, or get sick. He's happy with that scenario

~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? 6 weeks

How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? brilliant
Why? They understand his condition really well, they pay real attention to him and have figured out some allergies we were unaware of. They are really, really child friendly. I am very grateful for their help, the thought of living somewhere without free healthcare is a sovering one - we'd be down a kid for sure

~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? yes, happily
so, why? because, sometimes, it's hard to know when things are ok, and when you are being a neurotic mother. It's reassuring to know that I can get a pharmacist to cast their eye over him and advise carry on/GP/A+E. I have a good relationship with our pharmacist since the minor injuries scheme came on board - in fact, I think their service has kept me sane.

Sirzy Sat 14-Apr-12 14:16:27

How well controlled is your child's asthma? better than it was, still not perfect

How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? very well, he sees it as 'normal' having it it since he was so young

Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms? Trying not to make it a big issue just part of day to day life

How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here. He is only 2 so I ensure his inhalers and granuals are done each day, it is part of his routine so he now asks for them anyway and does when he needs his ventolin.

When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why? Every 3 months at the hospital, last appointment was very useful as he was started on singulair which has made a big difference.

Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not? only with regards to checking if he is allowed other items of medication

tleaf Sat 14-Apr-12 14:48:47

Young pharmacist recommended teenage relative to also use the BUTEYKO technique of shallow breathing. As a result there is much better control of symptoms and reduction in prescribed meds.

AwShucks Sat 14-Apr-12 23:24:12

Ignore it and hope it goes away.

MrsS3 Sun 15-Apr-12 01:34:08

~ How well controlled is your child's asthma? was great til a month ago... How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? ok, mostly (but not tonight)
Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms? going slowly with inhalers - children do like to rush!
~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? chart
How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? chart
Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here. we use a home made laminated timetable with stuff to stick on. Works for us.
~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? not useful and "advice" and action was clearly useless, causing huge deterioration and now we are relying on ventolin - she's had 4 lots today sad Why? a month ago : new paed SHO took her off steroid medication without consulting why she was on it, which was multi-purpose. It looks like she will have to get admitted to childrens ward tonight or tomorrow as a result, her asthma is much worse now. Idiots.
~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? haven't done so far, but would happily do so If so, why? advice likely to be good If not, why not?

bubby64 Mon 16-Apr-12 12:00:19

~How well controlled is your child's asthma? - Fairly well controlled, it is closely linked with hayfever, and he tends to have more problems during the height of the season.
~How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? - He copes much better now, as he is now 11, and can understand what is happening, when small, he used to panic a lot, which, obviously, made things a lot worse.
~Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?- Again- knowledge helps, and also using the turbohaler, as it slows the whole process down and ensures a better dosage.
~How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here- It has always been Take Inhaler then Clean teeth, drummed into him morning and night with his preventer, its automatic now for him. With his ventolin, he does not take that too often, and lets me know when and why, as it is such a rare thing nowdays, thank God!
~When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?- He is reviewed regularly every 6 months at the Asthma Clinic along with myself (a fellow sufferer). I find that it is useful for him to be reminded that his symptoms are well controlled as he is taking his preventers, not despite of taking them! He did have an extra appointment and change of treatment last summer, as his symtoms increased, and he was due to go away on a week long school trip.
~Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not? - Don't see why not, although I am an Asthma sufferer as well as a nurse, and so haven't really had the need to do this.

PatsysPyjamas Fri 20-Apr-12 23:29:02

~ How well controlled is your child's asthma?
Fairly well. Pre-diagnosis aged 3 she had 6 hospital visits (A&E or overnight) in 6 months. Very frustrating as I am asthmatic and recognised the symptoms. Now aged 5.5 she has not been admitted to hospital in 2.5 years.

How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?
I always thought you could only give 2 puffs of the salbutamol inhaler at a time, but was advised by doctors that it's fine to give up to 10 at a time.

I know from myself that warm water - steam, baths, showers, swimming - seams to help, while cold damp air does the opposite.

~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here.
My daughter is only 5, so I administer her preventative inhaler. She is getting better at asking for the blue one, but often has to be
reminded.

~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?
Within 6 months. Her asthma has been fairly constant, so not hugely useful on this occasion, however, I like the fact she has the review.

~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?
I don't think I have, no. I suppose as I am asthmatic I assume I know most general info, and for anything serious I would consult her GP.

badger01 Mon 23-Apr-12 14:41:23

~ How well controlled is your child's asthma? How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?
I have a boy of 6 who suffers with asthma. He copes quite well with his symptoms and asks for his blue puffer at school if he needs it.
I listen to how he feels and manage his symptoms that way. He was diagnosed when he was 3 and is great at communicating how he is to me. Believing them when they tell you they have a tight chest or 'tummy ache' is the key to managing symptoms.

~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here.
Luckily my son has always been good at taking his inhaler so i don't have to encourage him. I suggest taking their favourite teddy bear to the astma reviews and putting the inhaler on them first is a good way of reassuring the child that it is ok.

~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?
My child is under a consultant at hospital and he is a good listener and very thorough in finding out information and managing my sons symptoms. I went to the local gp surgery for his asthma review and was advised against the consultants advice to reduce his preventer medicine to the next strength down and he had a full blown asthma attack.

~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?
I haven't ever asked a pharmacist for advice about asthma as I am well informed by the consultant and I didnt realise that they offered advice on managing asthma symptoms. I would consider asking for advice from a pharmacy in the future.

TheOtherHelenMumsnet (MNHQ) Thu 26-Apr-12 16:59:17

Thanks to everyone who has added their comments to this thread - Lloydspharmacy really appreciate it and your hints/tips may appear in an email from Mumsnet soon!

I'm pleased to announce that the winner of the prize draw is...

Lackadaisycal

A £100 John Lewis voucher is yours! I'll PM you to get your details.

LackaDAILYcarb Thu 26-Apr-12 17:00:40

OMG OMG....grin grin grin

<never wins anything disbelief>

LackaDAILYcarb Thu 26-Apr-12 17:02:10

in my low carb disguise, but it is me, honest guv grin

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