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Would you show this video to your child? Watch a short film about some of the dangers teenagers may face if they run away from home and tell us what you think. £2 donation from Aviva to Railway Children for every watch/ comment

(110 Posts)
AnnMumsnet (MNHQ) Wed 10-Apr-13 09:44:41

Railway Children have shared this video which illustrates a shocking story of what can happen to a teenager if they run away & spend time alone on UK streets. Many do make it back home safely but some end up in very different situations, forced to take huge risks in order to survive.

As part of our campaign with charity Railway Children & Aviva - to raise awareness of the fact that one child is estimated to run away from home every five minutes in the UK - we'd like as many MNers as possible to watch the video then post what you think of it on this thread:

~ Would you share it with your teenage DC (if you have one/will have one soon!)?
~ Would you use it as a conversation starter about the topic of running away from home?
~ This has been classified as Cert 15 for cinema use, do you agree? At what age do you think it would be appropriate for children to see it?
~ Do you think the video should be shown at school?

For every view of the video and for every comment* Aviva will donate £2 to Railway Children.

Here's the film



Sadly, having a child run away from home is much more common that you think. It is estimated that one child runs away from home or care in the UK every five minutes - that amounts to 100,000 each year. Railway Children exists to not only help provide safety and support for these children but also to help educate young people on the risks and alternatives to running away from home, to prevent more from doing so.

If you would like to sign up to receive more information from Railway Children, you can do that here and this too will trigger an additional donation from Aviva.

If you've got any questions, please feel free to ask.

Thanks,
MNHQ

*At least 90 seconds.

LineRunner Wed 10-Apr-13 18:28:30

I agree that there needs to be a story about a boy as well as a girl, involving prostitution. The prostitution has to be shown as dangerous not just a bit 'ugh'.

Yes I would watch it with my teenagers; from age 12; and the current film is fine for school - but as I said, there needs to be a boy's narrative as well.

And something to give hope about returning either home or to a different place.

Wonderful music - well chosen. Wonderful campaign. Thank you, AnnMN.

trice Wed 10-Apr-13 18:44:57

I am not convinced about the efficacy of these scary public education films. I would be more impressed by a film showing the escape options for teens who are pushed to extremes. Sometimes staying at home is worse.

DisorganisednotDysfunctional Wed 10-Apr-13 18:54:31

I would be more impressed by a film showing the escape options for teens who are pushed to extremes. Sometimes staying at home is worse.

What a brilliant idea, Trice! Make a film showing how a teenager with a vile home life escapes -- safely. Outline strategies for getting away from intolerable situations.

Who can you contact? What about housing? Who might help. That sort of thing. Of course, you might find that the options are very few indeed, given the current climate. sad

Even prostitution is probably better than being raped by your stepfather. And if you're young and pretty it doesn't have to be anything like as grim as on the film.

I also agree with you about scary public education films. They do tend to arouse ridicule.

Madlizzy Wed 10-Apr-13 18:58:24

I agree that it's not gritty enough. I went to parties like that and the hardest thing I took was alcohol and that was whilst I was living at home. The prostitution bit was unrealistic - she looked wholly too cool and calm, rather than drugged and coerced. My kids would watch it and say "Duh, that's a no brainer". I don't think it will persuade any child to stay home really, and the majority of kids who do abscond are in unsafe, unhappy homes or are supposedly looked after kids.

Madlizzy Wed 10-Apr-13 18:59:27

Oh, and I'd be happy with a 12 certificate on that too. Kids that age are surprisingly knowledgeable about the world.

MissTweed Wed 10-Apr-13 19:41:11

I got a chicken breast out of the freezer this morning to defrost and forgot about it. It's been sat on my window sill ever since.... Do you think it is safe to cook up or not take the risk and just feed to to my DH instead?

MissTweed Wed 10-Apr-13 19:41:40

Sorry wrong thread blush

LineRunner Wed 10-Apr-13 19:43:02

grin

grin fantastic misstweed

firawla Wed 10-Apr-13 20:17:11

most children who run away, isn't it because they have a shit life already so i don't think a video like this will make a difference?? agree with trice

cory Wed 10-Apr-13 20:37:54

"trice Wed 10-Apr-13 18:44:57
I am not convinced about the efficacy of these scary public education films. I would be more impressed by a film showing the escape options for teens who are pushed to extremes. Sometimes staying at home is worse."

"DisorganisednotDysfunctional Wed 10-Apr-13 18:54:31
I would be more impressed by a film showing the escape options for teens who are pushed to extremes. Sometimes staying at home is worse.

What a brilliant idea, Trice! Make a film showing how a teenager with a vile home life escapes -- safely. Outline strategies for getting away from intolerable situations.

Who can you contact? What about housing? Who might help. That sort of thing. Of course, you might find that the options are very few indeed, given the current climate.

Even prostitution is probably better than being raped by your stepfather."

This.

Also a film that shows how you avoid being born into a family that will throw you out onto the streets as soon as you grow into a teen. Going on information provided by such charities as Centrepoint, teens who live rough have not necessarily had much of a choice in the matter.

freakydeaky Wed 10-Apr-13 21:16:59

Have just watched this with DS (14). He thought it was ok, but not gritty enough to actually put anybody off running away.
As others have pointed out, it was a bit 'music vid' and made the grooming, the dealing and drug taking look quite glamorous. The prostitution bit was a bit more scary, but even in that she seemed confident and in control.
I think it could be shown in schools from age 12 upwards as part of a lesson, complete with discussion about the various issues it raises.
For possibly unsupervised cinema watching, I'd think a 15 cert would be appropriate.

DontSHOUTTTTTT Wed 10-Apr-13 21:17:49

At 15+ it's a bit late to start educating those who may be prone to running away. I wouldn't show it to my kids, ages 20, 19 and 15 as I don't think they would learn anything from it. They learnt more from having conversations when we were out and about. We would see someone on the street and talk about why they were there.

15+ seems about right but it a bit style over substance. Bits of it seem like an episode of Skins sad. I would have thought something more 'honest' and real would be more engaging. A few interviews with kids who have actually run away might be more compelling and easy to relate too.

It would be ok to show the film in schools as it would be a starter for discussions.

Lockedout434 Wed 10-Apr-13 22:21:45

~ Would you share it with your teenage DC (if you have one/will have one soon!)?

It's too implied and not explicit as other posters have said the girl doesn't change. There are some police shots of people from first drug arrest to 6 months later after a few more arrests and the change seen is more affecting and an alteration in the girls appearance would be more affective.
~ Would you use it as a conversation starter about the topic of running away from home? Possibly but train spotting or other documentaries and court cases ie oldham grooming cases would be a better starter
~ This has been classified as Cert 15 for cinema use, do you agree? At what age do you think it would be appropriate for children to see it? Yes 15 appears to be ok
~ Do you think the video should be shown at school? It would need a lot of explanation and more information of how to get help.

MrsWolowitz Thu 11-Apr-13 08:13:22

I would show this to a teenager but I'm not sure it would be effective. The message was quite subtle and the first half may even appeal to teenagers (being given chips/parties/staying out with no restrictions).

The video could have been grittier and more obvious in its message. If its already rated as 15 then it could have been more graphic. Not to be gratuitous but to have more shock factor and to stick in the memory of young people who watch it. I don't think this is shocking or memorable, especially not for teenagers.

Certainly not 'real' enough to be shocking or to make kids realise they are not invincible. Agree with other posters in that everything was too implied: the danger, the risks, the horror of living on the streets, the hunger, lack of sanitation. I have a 15 year old daughter and will show her this when she wakes up and ask what she thinks but I don't imagine it would make a great impact, sorry

I will also show it to my 12 year old son and see if his reaction is different and whether he understands the drug and prostitution references.

I would be happy for my kids to be shown this at school.

snowballschanceineaster Thu 11-Apr-13 11:01:30

My dd is 12. I wouldn't show her this now, but not because it's too old for her. She is a very young 12 in some ways...has a 48 year old head on her shoulder in others. We have talked about drugs, drinking, internet dangers and poor choices generally and she takes it in, but then says it's not really anything I should worry about.

She has her own space and when she gets frustrated with us, she goes there.

If she started to talk about running away, or if her relationship with us deteriorated and I felt it was a risk, I'd show her this. I don't think I'm being naive thinking it wouldn't happen to us...I know how quickly things can deteriorate in families, but I do think that we currently are not at risk of this happening. If it was shown at school, I wouldn't worry about it but at a cinema, I'd worry about the context. If a kid had just popped to the pictures to see a movie and this came on, I think there'd be lots of eye rolling and nudging. I also agree that some elements look a little glamorised and not quite gritty enough.

snowballschanceineaster Thu 11-Apr-13 11:19:42

My dd is 12. I wouldn't show her this now, but not because it's too old for her. She is a very young 12 in some ways...has a 48 year old head on her shoulder in others. We have talked about drugs, drinking, internet dangers and poor choices generally and she takes it in, but then says it's not really anything I should worry about.

She has her own space and when she gets frustrated with us, she goes there.

If she started to talk about running away, or if her relationship with us deteriorated and I felt it was a risk, I'd show her this. I don't think I'm being naive thinking it wouldn't happen to us...I know how quickly things can deteriorate in families, but I do think that we currently are not at risk of this happening. If it was shown at school, I wouldn't worry about it but at a cinema, I'd worry about the context. If a kid had just popped to the pictures to see a movie and this came on, I think there'd be lots of eye rolling and nudging. I also agree that some elements look a little glamorised and not quite gritty enough.

snowballschanceineaster Thu 11-Apr-13 11:20:05

Sorry...this posted twice.

prettybird Thu 11-Apr-13 13:17:28

Another one who thinks it is not gritty enough. The party looks too much fun and it is not clear enough that the girl who offered her chips may have been "grooming" her. Actress stays too clean too - and the effect of the drugs is not nasty enough. Unless things are spelled out to teenagers, they will assume that "the worst" wouldn't happen to them.

~ Would you share it with your teenage DC (if you have one/will have one soon!)?
Possibly - but think we would get more traction by using news items or TV shows like CSI as "warnings".
~ Would you use it as a conversation starter about the topic of running away from home?
See above.
~ This has been classified as Cert 15 for cinema use, do you agree? At what age do you think it would be appropriate for children to see it?
I think 12A would probably be OK for it - but that's maybe because I have a mature 12 year old
~ Do you think the video should be shown at school?
Yes - and used as an opportunity for further extension work.

Dooohhh Thu 11-Apr-13 13:21:18

I. Think deffinatley not 15, maybe the beginning of year 6 or something.

releasethehounds Thu 11-Apr-13 13:42:11

Good video but not as shocking as I expected it to be. I'd definitely show it to my 14 year old DD (and younger), but sadly I don't think it would be the most shocking thing she has ever seen. There is far worse to be seen on the internet, even if you are a parent who takes an interest - you can't be watching with them all the time. I don't think the video has any surprises - it's a lot harder for a parent of a teen to watch it than a teen tbh. Agree with prettybird - the video could stand to be a lot harder-hitting.

releasethehounds Thu 11-Apr-13 13:52:21

Just shown the video to DD (14) - she wasn't particularly impressed by it. Her only comment was that more time should be spent on looking at the issues which cause teens to run away from home in the first place.

SlambangSweepstakeQueen Thu 11-Apr-13 14:49:23

Just watched the video with a view to showing it to my 2 teenaged sons and it's really pissed me off as it's so very very anti male.

According to the most recent stats 10% of females run away at some point and 8% of males (so not such a very big difference). Boys also get abused, hooked on drugs and sexually assaulted. Yet in this vid the males are only shown as sexual aggressors and predators. There are any number of leery males at the party plus a creepy pimp and customer but not a single male is shown as vulnerable or victimised. What will this video say to my teenaged sons?

It certainly wont make them think of the dangers to themselves of running away. It may make them feel slightly guilty about how the male in society tends to exploit the female. It may make them view girls as particularly vulnerable and open to exploitation. I expect they'll feel it has no bearing on them whatsoever.

Would you share it with your teenage DC?
~ Would you use it as a conversation starter about the topic of running away from home?
~ Do you think the video should be shown at school?

For the reasons above the answer to all the questions above is NO.

And cert 15 at the cinema? I think it's not hard hitting enough to merit a 15 certificate. By 15 most children who may runaway are already doing it or close. I'd say a 12 cert with a clearer message and a less biaised POV.

Just showed this to my 15 year old daughter. She said she thought it would make teenagers think about consequences and possibilities. She thought it was honest enough but said that coming from a happy, secure home, running away and it's inherent dangers was simply not something she had ever given any thought to. She felt that there was no need to show more shocking images to get the point across and that the scenes showing the grooming and trafficking were obvious. I still stand by my opinion that the film makers could have gone further.

She did comment on the lack of phone number or website to contact if you were in trouble and wanted to talk to someone confidentially.

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