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NOW CLOSED Do you have a child with asthma? Please share your experiences with Lloydspharmacy and you could win a £100 John Lewis voucher

(76 Posts)
TheOtherHelenMumsnet (MNHQ) Tue 10-Apr-12 11:31:59

Lloydspharmacy would like to hear how Mumsnetters and their DC with asthma manage their symptoms and where they go for advice. Here is what Lloydspharmacy says about why it's working with Mumsnetters: "One in 11 children in the UK has asthma and it is the most common long-term medical condition for children. During April and May, Lloydspharmacy is blowing the whistle on asthma - we'd love to hear your views on how your DC cope with their asthma. We're also offering a free asthma check-up where we’ll take the time to discuss your concerns and advise on how your child can get the most from their asthma medicines."

So if you have a child with asthma, Lloydspharmacy would like to hear your thoughts on the questions below. We know that asthma can range from very severe to mild, so please only answer the questions where you feel comfortable doing so.

~ How well controlled is your child's asthma? How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?
~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here.
~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?
~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?

Please feel free to add any other comments you may have on this. Everyone who adds their comments to this thread will be entered into a prize draw where one MNer will win a £100 John Lewis voucher. Please note that your comments may appear in an email MNHQ will be sending out.

Thanks and good luck with the prize draw!
MNHQ

LadySybilDeChocolate Tue 10-Apr-12 11:39:48

How well controlled is your child's asthma?
It hasn't been very well controlled in the past. He would have benefited from a preventor as well as a reliever.

How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms?
Not very well as he doesn't always remember to carry an inhaler.

Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?
To make sure he uses the reliever before he does PE at school, to make sure his mouth and nose is covered in the cold weather as this triggers his asthma off.

How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here.
He's 13 so should be able to do this himself. I need to make sure he remembers to take them out with him though.

When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?
He's never had a review and support from the NHS has been limited. I take him back to the GP for inhalers but they just hand out the prescription rather then provide any helpful advice. I've had to learn myself, which is rediculous.

Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?
I have done previously.

Roseformeplease Tue 10-Apr-12 11:41:41

I have asthma and so does my son, aged 11. His is triggered by animals and is also linked with hay fever. He is pretty good about managing his asthma and takes a brown inhaler once or twice a day, knows about upping the dose for colds and if we visit people with animals. We keep Salvutamol inhalers everywhere: coat pockets, school bags, school office and I carry one as does my husband ( we both work at his school). He has never been in real distress and properly managed asthma means no scares. As a child I found my asthma terrifying and I have tried to ensure his is well managed. Our GP is very good and we now have annual checks at the village chemists.

colditz Tue 10-Apr-12 12:29:22

How well controlled is your child's asthma? How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms? Both children have asthma, and it's fairly well controlled. SOmtimes have difficulty making the school understand why their attendance was low... before I got it properly under control. If one of them is spoiling for an attack, I find a warm steamy shower can offer a lot of relief, and ward off a hospital trip, along with the inhalers, as it both steams them and relaxes them
~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here. Well, I don't really encourage them to use their inhaler, I tell them to. They've both been hospitalised before so they know what it's like, they know that it;s more likely if they don't use their inhaler
~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why? within a year, and they are useful at trialing different medications. I found that antihistimines help my oldest child in the summer, as his hay fever sometimes triggers his asthma, and it was at a review that this was suggested to me
~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not? I wouldn't go to a pharmacist because all asthma medication is prescription only - you have to go to a doctor or prescribing nurse and then pick up the meds from the pharmacy anyway. The doctor or nurse will tell me what I need to know, there's no gap in the market for a pharmacist unless they start being able to prescribe. Saying that, I had an inhaler loss emergancy once, and they were able to let me have one there and then, so long as they took mine and my son's doctor details and address.

Sittinginthesun Tue 10-Apr-12 12:31:42

DS2 is 5 years old, and was diagnosed at 3 years. Relatively mild, but he would cough all night for several months, and was so tired he looked almost grey. When he starting on an inhaler, he literally changed colour, went up a clothes size, and looked so "well".

We manage it okay. He uses a brown inhaler twice a day, with the dose doubled in December and January. We rarely use the blue inhaler, apart from in midwinter, although I was caught out a few weeks ago when he was playing outside in the dark, and got cold. It took me a week to get it under control - it was quite frightening.

His triggers are colds, and cold, damp air. If it is misty/foggy, I have to keep him quite wrapped up. His Reception teacher is good at remembering in school.

Sittinginthesun Tue 10-Apr-12 12:33:37

Oh, and he as annual check ups at the GPs. Best advice I have had was from the specialist asthma nurse who visits the surgery periodically.

KatyMac Tue 10-Apr-12 12:38:15

~ How well controlled is your child's asthma?
Terribly
How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms?
Badly
Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?
Take meds regularly see GP/Hospital when she gets a cold
~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler?
Don't really
How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not?
Watch them
Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here.
No - it's a nightmare
~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional?
6 weekly
How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?
Same old, same old - nothing changes
~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?
Yes but I got nowhere, she is on maximum meds already

DD has atypical asthma which doesn't respond well to viruses

hattifattner Tue 10-Apr-12 12:55:00

How well controlled is your child's asthma?

It was very well controlled until last year, when he reached 11, and suddenly we seemed to be up the hospital every 5 minutes. We finally, after a nightmare year, managed to persuade GP to change his meds. SInce then, he has not had an attack!

How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? Last year we got into a vicious circle, - he had a major attack in the January, requiring 2 days in hospital. AFter that, he would panic during an attack, which of course made it 10x worse. Now he has learned to relax after lots of reassurance from paediatricians. I think the psychology of asthma is overlooked.

Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?

My son swims very well, which helps him, in his words "clear out his pipes." grin
In an attack, we ask him to visualise swimming his favourite stroke and breath in that rhythm, which helps him concentrate and not panic.

How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? I nag. grin

How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? I don't. He has been on inhalers since he turned 4, and is now 12, so he does have his own routine. Plus at 12, he needs to be responsible for his own meds. Last year taught him that.

Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here. Nagging.

When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? January, at our request. Previously: October. But not sucessful.

How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?
We were reviewed in October by Asthma clinic nurse. We raised concerns that DS's meds were no longer effective, and said how often he was needing ventolin. the advice given was to use his spacer, but really that did not help. After seeing the nurse practitioner for a chest infection and related asthma attacks in December, we finally asked her to review him (she is awesome) and she recommended a change in meds in January. SInce then....no wheeze, no tightness, no ventolin!

Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not? have asked about combinations of medicines and about dosage of prednisilone when the amount given at hospital seemed very high.

shrinkingnora Tue 10-Apr-12 12:59:46

How well controlled is your child's asthma? Very but it has taken five years of persistent coughs, chest xrays and inhaler trials to get here

How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? Very well now.

Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms? Being calm and aware and having a clear idea of what to do when symptoms start

How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? I let her take a great deal of (secretly supervised) responsibilty for it. She likes to do her peak flow and fill in the chart.

How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? It has become part of routine but it is always obvious if she hasn't taken it.

Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here. We make getting a good peak flow reading a challenge - she knows that without regular inhaler use she won't get a good reading.

When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? 3 months ago but we are due another one to report back on the success of the inhalerts/

How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Useful but not as useful as then next one will be. Why? Our GP is excellent and very clear about what he is dooing and why re drugs.

Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? I would because we often ask the local pharmacist for advice and always find him to be extremely knowledgable and sensible. He is also very good at saying when he thinks we should go to the GP instead!

JustHecate Tue 10-Apr-12 13:10:20

~ How well controlled is your child's asthma? How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms? very well controlled. He copes fine. No techniques

~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here. I tell him he has to. It's not really a democracy in this house grin

~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why? he has an annual review. They're not really helpful. I don't learn anything I didn't already know, and he doesn't care

~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not? no. I've been asthmatic since I was a child. I don't really need any advice on it.

JustHecate Tue 10-Apr-12 13:13:37

by that I meant I have a lot of experience and understanding to help my child.

DS's asthma is very very mild..

~ How well controlled is your child's asthma? How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?

He copes fine and it is very well controlled (exercise induced, mainly in cold weather) - since he has never had a full-blown attack he is slow to recognise that (for example) the inhaler kept at school is running on empty, and I wish they did (or we could get - maybe they do?) salbutamol inhalers with counters like I have on Seretide.

~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here.

I tell him to grin - and point out the causal relationship between him running out of breath/ getting shouted at for not keeping up in PE and him forgetting to take his inhaler. That is the limit of my control since he only needs it at school

~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?

He hasn't had one yet (~18mths from diagnosis) - thanks for the reminder. However, since I am asthmatic I don't think I will learn a huge amount, although the asthma specialist practice nurse is very knowledgeable.

~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?

No - because we collect prescriptions from the dispensary in the GP surgery (rural practice) so the opportunity doesn't really arise.

BeerTricksPott3r Tue 10-Apr-12 13:29:41

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

~ How well controlled is your child's asthma? How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?
Seems OK currently, but he's only 2 and has had an inhaler since his 1st birthday. But no actual diagnosis because he's too young... hmm

~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here.
Pin him down and force it on him? Seriously it was like that to start with (we just use the reliever before bed and before exercise/as needed during). He's much better now and will happily just sit on my knee while I do it. He likes to "help" press it down and "counts" along with me while I count his breaths.

~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?
He has never had a review. We got the inhaler after his neonatal consultant wrote to the GP and told her to prescribe it. We have had no further contact from anyone, despite asking about seeing the asthma nurse, because he's "too young to have asthma". We're due to see his consultant again in a couple of weeks, and I'll speak to her again, as she's been the most use so far!

~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?
I haven't because we've done OK so far muddling along. But I would be happy to ask for advice if I felt I needed to, I bother them about all sorts of things on a regular basis grin

~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?
*Actually, that's a fib - I have asked for advice, when the inhaler and spacer were first prescribed I had to ask the pharmacist what to do with it, how the spacer worked, and what dose he should have, as I had literally no idea and the GP hadn't bothered to talk to me about any of it - she was very reluctant to prescribe the inhaler at all and it was all a bit of a nightmare. But once we had it and knew what we were doing (more or less) DS suddenly started sleeping better, was less grumpy during the day, coughed a lot less etc etc.

Ours too was very young when prescribed asthma medication, aged one. I say 'prescribed medication' as they didn't actually commit to a diagnosis for the distressing breathing difficulties. We keep the heating on to keep the house warm through the night, as the cold air triggers it.

Nursery was a real help with taking the inhaler. Luckily we were given a really good compact spacer with illustrations of toys so she treated it as hers. Nursery sat the children around in a circle and used it to help with counting practice. For some this might be off-putting but it made my DD feel very special and proud of herself. My mum is a nurse and she also helped by whispering the count in DD's ear on her lap.

Not so much a review of her 'asthma' but it gets looked at every time she has a chest infection of horrible cough, which thankfully is less frequent as she gets older. We were told from the start that it may or may not turn out to be 'permanent' asthma, as there is a lot of cross over when babies have recurring bronchiolitis and related illnesses.

I have never considered speaking to a pharmacist about it. I can't put my finger on why - just no need to? Or a feeling that this is so serious for a very young child so I should only speak to a doctor?

~ How well controlled is your child's asthma? How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?

DD has mild asthma, which we tend only to have to treat when she gets unwell with something else. Her main symptom is coughing and wheezing at night, which does affect how well she sleeps, so we keep on top of it by beginning her brown inhaler the minute she shows any signs of an upper respiratory virus. We tend to encourage her to sleep in a more reclined position as she also has chronic rhinitis which can mean she's struggling to breathe all night, and this lessens those symptoms. It does also affect her energy levels, so she can tire more quickly sometimes, I have to watch for dark circles and general listlessness, and then go easy on what I expect from her.

~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here.

When she was little I used to pretend it was a trumpet and she had to play music on it. Now she is the one who reminds me she needs to take it, as it is part of a well set routine we have. The school give her a sticker when she's had her inhalers there, I had to write them a letter and give them their own supply of medication/spacer, and I tend to send in a communication book with a note each day that she needs her inhaler.

~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?

She saw a specialist about allergies a few months ago, he also advised me on how to treat her asthma, along with eczema and the rhinitis. He was quite helpful and put my mind at ease.

~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?

I would usually check whether or not they are okay to have a new medication, as I know some can affect asthmatics, and I tend to trust a pharmacists knowledge when it comes to medication, whereas I know sometimes my doctor forgets to ask whether I take anything else to check for interactions, and I don't like to always bother him when I am seeing the pharmacist any way to pick up the medication.

orangina Tue 10-Apr-12 14:27:32

Ok, here goes:

~ How well controlled is your child's asthma? How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?

I would say that DS's asthma is fairly well controlled. He may still grow out of it (he is 5 now) and our trips to a+e have certainly lessened over the years. I am better at spotting a cough/wheeze that is likely to turn into an attack and to give him his inhaler before it turns into a crisis (at which point he suddenly really doesn't want it.... I think it is related to having the spacer put over his nose when he is having trouble breathing, it is somehow counter intuitive to cover your face when you are struggling for breath.....)

~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here.

He is pretty good at taking his inhaler when he needs to, as he knows it will make him feel better. He has even asked for his inhaler on occasion when he can tell he has a cough that is bothering him re: his breathing. If he doesn't want to take his inhaler, I often put him on my lap in front of the television and we can get it into him then. As soon as he is out of the crisis zone, he doesn't mind doing the inhaler. If absolutely necessary, I just pin him down (!), but if he gets v upset it has a negative impact on his breathing anyway, so that's why I try and get it in him sooner rather than later (and avoid the upset). He can't yet do the inhaler by himself (not quite strong enough to push down the canister to deliver a proper dose....)

~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?

He saw a consultant last summer when we realised he had a peanut allergy too. The two may or may not be linked, but in the event of ingesting any peanut, we have to give him a dose of steroids to avoid the "perfect storm" (consultant's words) of a subsequent asthma attack on top of an allergic reaction. So, very useful. I take all the gear away with us in case of an incident and feel fairly confident I could deal with it all if necessary.

~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?

My local pharmacy is just brilliant and the pharmacist is fantastic (he helped me when dd was a tiny baby and I had a ghastly burn incident with her). I wouldn't hesitate to ask him if I needed help that I couldn't get elsewhere at the time, but I can't imagine a scenario with ds where I might need their help, re: advice.

I hope that helps!

GangstaGranny Tue 10-Apr-12 14:36:14

How well controlled is your child's asthma?
DD is 9. Was finally diagnosed 2 years ago after about 5 year history of to and fro from drs complaining of coughing+++ worse at night and being fobbed of with the viral answer. Was eventually given ventolin inhaler age 6 but only got diagnosis in year 2 when became so SOB and wheezy that ended up on oral prednisolone. Was not offered any follow up and ultimately returned to drs 2 weeks later in tears as so exhausted with deteriorating nights. Now have steroid inhaler so am pretty on top of things but have generally been met with an assumption that I should know how to manage symptoms and been given almost no education type support (am a HCP with moderate knowledge of asthmaso not sure if nurses just assumed I knew)

How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms?
DD is pretty mild and knows inhalers work so generally manages well. Three main problems have been DD to shy to tell different teacher that she needs to get inhaler from bag so sent for glass of water instead; DD raising hand to ask to get inhaler from bag and teacher being busy so telling DD to wait (teacher didn't realise what DD needed, DD became v. upset, teacher agreed that if DD needed inhaler in future then to just go and get it without asking); DD feeling embarrased about using inhaler in front of other kids, resolved with breath activated inhaler so not using spacer any more so less obtrusive.

Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?
Gradually picking up hints on inhaler use. Generally symptoms helped by DDs swimming (club level, pretty good for her age)

How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler?
DD very good at taking blue inhaler when at school as knows it helps. Got good routine with peak flow then steroid inhaler before teeth cleaning so even when DD on Brownie Pack Holiday still keeps up with routine.

How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not?
I usually hear DD take inhaler as uses spacer so can hear from kitchen. In yr 3 TA wrote in coniact book every time DD used ventolin at school. In yr 4 had no feedback from school until bad week last term when had note about her using inhaler several times per day every day that week. It was helpful to know so I simply thanked the TA wth a note back to let them know what measures we had in place to try and combat it from our end. Very often I can tell with good old maternal instinct when she's not right so I ask and she tells!

Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here. Not really I'm afraid. A nice bag for her to carry her ventolin inhaler when she goes out helps

When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?
Last review was insisted upon after I called the GP to find out how much I could increase her steroid inhaler by (had forgotten to shut bedroom window on misty night, on going misty weather, peak flow in boots and not improving with double dose. Saw asthmas nurse who accused me of over reacting to peak flows because she was basing levels by the book (should be max of 190)whereas I was going on DDs usualy normal (250, she swims if you recall). All told, I didn't really feel we gained anything at all from that review. Seeing a new asthma nurse in 2 days time and have more faith as met this nurse for my smear, mentioned DDs issue with using inhaler and with given easi-breathe by her. Need to see her as DDs peak flows not been right since february and can't do anything with them!

Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?
Not really asked pharmacist for advice as I work in a hospital so generally discuss any problems with paed nurse I know very well. Not sure I'd think about talking to pharmacist though but can't really justify that statement!

thereonthestair Tue 10-Apr-12 15:08:34

How well controlled is your child's asthma?

Currently well. It took a few months to get there though with the help of a very good asthma nurse in the childrens outpatient department. However DS was prem and had a respitory paed from birth which helped (as far as asthma is concerned)

How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms?

Ok now its controlled, the inhalers work well, now we have the right one, DS who is 2 will take them when he's ill. When he's not he's a sod but then again he is 2

Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?

DS has had lung disease since he was born. It's part of life for him. However the asthma nurse showed us various techniques to get him to take the inhaler.

Initially as a baby she told us to try and give him the inhaler in the high chair which worked, and to count, and smile. DS therefore knows when the inhaler will be finisihed.

We also sing (another tip from the nurse)

and now get DS to push the end in himself so he feels like he is taking some control (a tip from nursery)

we never fight him, and come back if DS is being 2 and refusing. Patience is a virtue

* How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? *

He's 2 he has no choice

How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? He's 2 we give it to him

* Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here.* see above about singing, counting and psuhing buttons. Also we have never given DS his inhaler in the buggies as we want to keep that as a safe space.
* When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional?* about 3 months ago, another one coming up in June.

* How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?*

Extremely as the paed listens to us, and looks at the bigger picture of a complex prem child with parents with too much to do who need to cut down on meds, (given the demands of the other conditions DS suffers from)

Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not? Not about asthma as such. And that's because even the GP sends DS to the paeds with his hisotry. However the pharamacist is great for sourcing meds, different doses etc for DS and even got us a sorted with a hospital prescription for Motenlukast after phoning round every Pharamcy in the coty. The pharmacist is brill, and a vital part of the team, but not for advice.

PuzzleRocks Tue 10-Apr-12 15:45:06

DD1 is 13 days shy of 5. She copes very well now that she is on medication. At 2 she had a number of serious hospital admissions and I had to really stamp my feet to get proper treatment for her.

I administer her inhaler and her teacher and teaching assistant are well versed in the signs. She takes her preventer at breakfast and before bed and asks for her reliever when need, no encouragement necessary. Given that she has started young I would imagine this routine is ingrained so things wont change much as she gets older.

She gets a review every six months or sooner if an attack necessitates. The consultant Paed has changed since she first started treatment. She is very good and thorough and I feel that DD1 is in good hands. She is professional but capable of genuine empathy too for which I am grateful. I have sobbed in her office.

Never considered talking to a pharmacist because I have put my faith in the hospital but now you have me wondering.

Julezboo Tue 10-Apr-12 16:00:54

How well controlled is your child's asthma?
Not very atm, though only recently diagnosed

How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms?
He seems to complain he is tired in his chest when he is suffering.

Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?
I try to get him to rest a while, watch a DVD, play DS etc..

~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler?
Doesnt need encouraging tbh, he has his orange one morning and night and blue one as and when throughout the day.

How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not?
When his breathing is a funny gaspy noise.

Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here.
Stickers on spacer, put their fave TV programme on, pretend to use it yourself, I have spacers within reach of my 4 year old so he is used to it being round and often has a play with it. He also has one at school.

~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?
Jan, due another one on 19th apr. We see an asthma nurse which i found helpful.

~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?
Never have, never thought to have tbh, wouldnt think they were qualified for it?

Abra1d Tue 10-Apr-12 16:32:40

~ How well controlled is your child's asthma? How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?
Pretty well controlled. It is rare for me to hear them coughing--unless there is a sudden change in weather/pollen levels/virus. I expect them to have a grip on their asthma control and they know they can expect a hard time from me if they are careless. They also both like sport and this tends to encourage good management.

~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here.
They are used to taking their Ventolin everywhere and it's the last thing they each check in the morning before leaving the house. I've never had to remind them why it matters: they both remember the ghastly coughing fits they had before they were diagnosed.

~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?
They attend an annual asthma clinic and so both would have had a review within the last year, probably within the last eight months. We never miss the check-up. I find it reassuring to get a weight and height check and peak-flow and it's good to have a reminder of the best technique for using inhalers.

~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?
I certainly would if, for instance, it was the weekend and our GP surgery was closed as it usually is. They wouldn't have the children's health records to hand, though, which might mean they wouldn't know all the facts about the seasonal triggers.

LackaDAISYcal Tue 10-Apr-12 17:57:30

I'm answering this for DS1, 10 who was diagnosed at 18 months.

~ How well controlled is your child's asthma?

At the moment It is under control, but he is slipping with his preventer again so we need to step It up now hayfever season is upon us.

How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms?

He panics if he has an attack, so our aim is to stop him from getting to that stage. He is getting better at recognising when he needs to use his reliever.

Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?

Not really

~ How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler?
We tell him rather than encourage tbh, otherwise he doesn't take his preventer and things get bad again.
How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not?
By watching him, tis the only way.

Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here. "Take your inhalers, or you will end up back in hospital and have to take steroids again" is all the motivation he needs grin

~ When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional?
Around 15 months ago, it is overdue blush

How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review?
Very useful as the asthma nurse gave us strategies for increasing his dose when he has a cold, and let us know the max. dose of ventolin we could give him short term.

~ Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma?
Haven't but there's no particular reason other than I didn't realise they could. I would ask them now however, If I couldn't get an appointment with my GP.

How well controlled is your child's asthma? How well do they cope with their asthma symptoms? Have you picked up any techniques along the way that you find help them cope with their symptoms?

Both of my children have asthma, and it is well controlled now, but this has not been the case in the past. I struggled to get inhalers from the GP, and was met by a stonewalling technique of "viral wheeze" for about a year before getting any sort of recognition of the real issue.

They both cope quite well with their symptoms. When they get wheezy they tell me that they need their puffers.

How do you encourage your child to take their inhaler? How do you monitor if they have taken their inhaler or not? Do you have any handy hints or tips for encouraging/motivating your child to take their inhaler? If so, please do share them here.

Initially we were encouraged to let the children play with the spacers so that they got used to them. These days though, they take them happily as they know what tends to happen if they don't keep up with the preventer inhaler (hospital). I monitor it by watching them, as they are too young really (3 and 6) to do it alone. I tend to count the breaths down, and if they are resisting, using the inhaler on a toy first sometimes helps.

When did your child last have a review of their asthma with a healthcare professional? How useful, or not, did you and/or your child find this review? Why?

We have reviews every 3 months with the asthma nurse at the surgery. The last one was 4 weeks ago and I find them to be not very useful. I find that we get conflicting advice from the nurses and the GP (being told by the nurses to change the Beclometasone dose as and when we need to, and then being told that this is a bad thing to do by the GP). My children are too young for a peak flow meter, so it generally becomes a case of yes/no/weigh/measure/goodbye.

Have you, or would you ever, consider asking a pharmacist for advice relating to asthma? If so, why? If not, why not?

I haven't, but this is simply because it has not been convenient. I have always needed a prescription when speaking to a GP, but if the pharmacist were available and able to discuss the asthma, then this may be a possibility. However, our pharmacy is crowded, small, and an unpleasant place to be.

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