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home schooling child with asd

(12 Posts)
kitakat Wed 01-Jan-14 20:21:59

My daughter is 14 and in yr 10 at school. For many months she has wanted to be home educated. She gets exclusions at school for silly reasons and her attendance for last term was not good about 70%. She finds school stressful and we feel the brunt of it at school. Since before Xmas she has been saying she will not be going back in the new year. Should I give home schooling a try when I will not be able to follow a school curriculum but would teach more life skills and how do I include socialising because at the moment school is the only interaction she has with her few friends.

kitakat Wed 01-Jan-14 21:59:49

Sorry forgot to say she has a diagnosis of Asperger's and ADHD although she is more withdrawn and lacking attention than hyperactive

manishkmehta Sat 04-Jan-14 12:20:41

Education otherwise, section 319 of the education act 1996 does allow it . However, at your daughters age it would be difficult to argue for it.

it is often given to young children where there is an integration plan in place to move them from home education to school full time.

manishkmehta Sat 04-Jan-14 12:20:42

Education otherwise, section 319 of the education act 1996 does allow it . However, at your daughters age it would be difficult to argue for it.

it is often given to young children where there is an integration plan in place to move them from home education to school full time.

manishkmehta Sat 04-Jan-14 12:32:13

Whilst this is something that could be achievable you would need expert opinion from an educational psychologist confirming that it was necessary. If the number of exclusions have been high then this may support your case for home education. i have noticed that you have raised the question of social interaction and in my opinion you could argue potentially, a part home part school placement.

It's not easy but it is possible.

manishkmehta Sat 04-Jan-14 12:36:14

Again it wouldn't be easy but you could argue for a split as per the case law.

www.education11kbw.com/2011/03/01/ms-v-lb-brent-2011-ukut-50-aac/

manishkmehta Sat 04-Jan-14 12:39:55

I must stress that at your daughters age it wouldn't be easy to argue this unless there had been many exclusions and an educational psychologist supported you with evidence.

For example if the exclusions were numerous then you could argue part home would allow her to continue her education seamlessly...

PolterGoose Mon 06-Jan-14 17:25:35

kita you'll get more replies on the SN Children board as it is much busier and this one is a bit neglected.

IIRC if you're in England or Wales you have a right to home educate and you don't have to follow the National Curriculum. There are online schools like Interhigh and BriteSchool which have good reputations and can make life easier for you! I'm assuming dd doesn't have a statement?

manishkmehta Mon 06-Jan-14 19:01:26

Very good points. Just remember you can elect to home school... However, that could mean all costs could fall to you. If you can argue at tribunal that you want part home part school because of the numerous exclusions then you might be able to get provision at home for tutors if you are able to make a section 319 argument.

www.educationotherwise.net

kitakat Tue 07-Jan-14 16:20:52

Thanks for the messages and links have spoke to school today as she is still adamant that she does not want to return to school. Her social interaction outside school has completely stopped in the last 6 months not sure but wonder if she is completely trying to cut herself off from the outside world.
School is stressful for her and the work is getting more difficult now its GCSE,s she does have slow processing issues which seem to be making certain subjects harder for her.
part time does seem to be a good alternative if she can be persuaded as the stress would be reduced.
I didn't know about the online schools so I will check this out.

kitakat Tue 07-Jan-14 16:35:23

Poltergoose - no dd does not have statement school refused to even try on the grounds that she was not far enough behind on her schoolwork - despite the fact that her social and maturity levels were far behind those of a similar age and that she doesn't really have much idea of how to behave/respond in the outside world. School have not really met her needs for anything not academic just alienating her more for exclusions that have been a result of their bad management and not understanding her needs.

I'm still waiting since before Xmas for a meeting for them to help put strategies in place for when she is getting stressed so that they can cope and help dd without the need to ring me to fetch her home or excluding her.

PolterGoose Tue 07-Jan-14 17:50:35

I really would repost on SN Children, lots of experience there smile

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