Threads in this topic are removed from the site 90 days after the thread was started. Our SN area is not a substitute for expert advice. Here some suggested organisations that offer expert advice on SN.

Fed up of feeling like it's all in my head

(8 Posts)
MellowMarshmallow Wed 05-Mar-14 12:58:50

ds2 (7) sent to paeds by school nurse 2 years ago as low muscle tone, poor co-ordination, poor fine motor skills, behavioural problems in school and considered 'unteachable' by very kind but exasperated reception teacher.

Saw community paed for ten mins, dx dyspraxia, referred to OT. Seen them three times.

He has made lots of progress at school - reading, maths, social skills all fine now. Sensory issues less of a problem thanks to lots of work at home and school.

Still has some issues, and I had this nagging doubt about whether a dx could really be made in such a short time without any other reports or ruling anything else out. Went to GP - no record of meeting with paeds. So we're starting at the beginning again.

But I honestly don't know if I've got it in me.

When he runs his left leg swings out and back in, with the foot slightly turned inwards, which I think is what's making him trip. GP asked him to walk across the room and said he couldn't see a problem. Also get a lot of 'well if you're worried' or 'some children can't run fast' from friends / family.

I don't expect him to run like Usain Bolt, I'm just gently inquiring as to whether there is any further OT or physio that might be available to help him.

He's also been experiencing symptoms of silent migraine (posted about it last night), and dh just wants to leave it and see what happens - but I have booked in with GP.

He's also under ENT for problems since birth and podiatry for flat feet.

TBH I have lost all perspective on what is worth a GP appointment and what isn't. All my family and DH are of the opinion that unless a limb is falling off, just soldier on. I am thinking a child with co-ordination problems, intermittent ear pain, hears things, struggles to run and describes legs as weak, plus monthly episodes of migraine-type symptoms, is worthy of investigation. But no, apparently this will all go away, if I just ignore it and I am beginning to think that's what I should do.

I want to just carry on as if everything is normal. But then he is crying because he has fallen over at after school club again (every week), or I watch how much he struggles to run because he really wants to, and I feel I owe it to him to at least get him as far as a community paed again.

No idea why I am posting really. Just so tired. And feel like I am imagining these concerns and I should stop dragging him to the drs.

ouryve Wed 05-Mar-14 14:55:42

You're right not to ignore the migraine symptoms, as they can sometimes be something else. If they are migraines, you'll want to identify triggers, as even painless migraines impair function, after they occur. And there's always a chance that they're not migraines - even more important that they're investigated.

Balaboosta Wed 05-Mar-14 15:12:00

Don't ignore your own instincts. Or worry that you are worrying too much. You have observed a whole bunch of difficulties. Make a list of all the things that you are concerned about and go back to your gp, not necessarily with your child. Rather than going to the doctor for each individual thing. Or book a phone call with the doctor. Ask specifically for a referral. Don't give too much weight to what friends and family say. If you're concerned, you're concerned. It's your job as a mum. Hope this makes some sense, it's a bit rambly! Basically, sending you good wishes.

Balaboosta Wed 05-Mar-14 15:13:14

Don't ignore your own instincts. Or worry that you are worrying too much. You have observed a whole bunch of difficulties. Make a list of all the things that you are concerned about and go back to your gp, not necessarily with your child. Rather than going to the doctor for each individual thing. Or book a phone call with the doctor. Ask specifically for a referral. Don't give too much weight to what friends and family say. If you're concerned, you're concerned. It's your job as a mum. Hope this makes some sense, it's a bit rambly! Basically, advising you to have confidence in your instincts. .

MellowMarshmallow Wed 05-Mar-14 15:40:26

Thanks. I think I'm more unsure because it's such a collection of things. And I really want to know one way or another if he has been diagnosed with dyspraxia. I've spent 2 years thinking he has school think he has, OT think he has but nothing on his records and I don't know if its a simple admin error or he needs to be reassessed.

stillstandingatthebusstop Wed 05-Mar-14 16:19:31

I think Balanoosta is right about following your instincts. You are the person who probably knows him best in the world.
I like the idea of writing it all down. I would take some time doing that and getting sorted in your head exactly what you are worrying about and what you want.
The only thing I would add is maybe to wait for a time when you are feeling up to speaking with the Dr and making the case for extra assessments/help. Do it when you feel up to it.

I once went to the GP to ask for a referral for Ds3 without taking him. The Dr was furious and rude, but I got what I wanted.

MellowMarshmallow Thu 06-Mar-14 22:17:38

Thought I'd update as you were all kind enough to encourage me. GP thought symptoms were migraine, and found DS had an ear infection too. Blood tests to follow, then Paed referral possibly to a couple of different people.

Feeling quite relieved that we may now understand the cause of the random vomiting that troubles him a few times each year and other random symptoms. Between his ears and migraine it's no surprise he has balance problems really.

Hopefully bloods will all be normal.

Balaboosta Sat 08-Mar-14 10:49:46

Good! That's great!

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now