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Sensory assessment

(27 Posts)
Ineedmorepatience Tue 23-Apr-13 19:10:24

Many of you know my Dd3 has a dx of Asd she is also hypermobile in all her joints. She has what I believe to be sensory issues but sometimes it is difficult to separate these from her other difficulties.

I have been thinking about getting her assessed by an OT. She has had an OT assessment as part of her Asd assessment which included a sentence in the report about sensory issues.

She only has one year left at primary and I really think I need to understand more about what causes her difficulties ie is it proprioception issues that cause her to fall and walk into things or is it hypermobility?

I just want opinions really because I dont want to waste my money but I feel that I need to be able to explain her difficulties when she moves schools.

So is a sensory assessment worth having or not?

Thankyou for reading smile

PolterGoose Tue 23-Apr-13 19:17:13

For ds the sensory stuff through the OT team has been amazing. I hadn't realised how lucky we are to have such good OT provision. So, I would definitely recommend it, however, there is real suspicion and misunderstanding I think, which makes it hard for others to take it seriously. But at home we do a lot of sensory activities to great results.

Ineedmorepatience Tue 23-Apr-13 19:24:07

Thanks polter, in my area we get an assessment and we got a good report from that highlighting lots of areas of difficulty but they only touched on sensory issues, after the report was written she was discharged. I think I might contact them though and just ask them if they can do a sensory assessment before I pay out.

PolterGoose Tue 23-Apr-13 19:50:26

Good plan. Ask them about the Alert Programme, it has done wonders for ds.

UnChartered Tue 23-Apr-13 19:57:49

we're waiting for DD to be assessed by OT for this too, it was recommended by CAMHS, but we're on the NHS hmm

she had a sensory profile done as part of her ASD assessments, this has helped with the surface stuff, but it's getting more obvious now that
DDs issues are hugely sensory, and they are not solid, ie they seem to change from day-to-day.

not sure how long we're expected to wait though - piece of string comes to mind.

Ineedmorepatience Tue 23-Apr-13 20:11:34

Thanks unchartered

I want to be on the NHS grin but I just dont think I am going to get anywhere. I have just dug out her report and I am going to email them.

Polter I will ask about Alert, thankyou smile

mrslaughan Tue 23-Apr-13 20:51:50

DS has dyspraxia - so a little diff, with sensory issues, his sensory therapy has been transformative......amazing......

Ineedmorepatience Tue 23-Apr-13 20:54:22

Thanks mrsl I definitely want to persue it at least to get an assessment.

I have emailed the department where she was assessed pre diagnosis to see if they will do a sensory assessment.

Fingers crossed I can avoid the private route as I really cant afford it but I need to know!

Ineedmorepatience Wed 24-Apr-13 20:47:59

Shameless bump, incase anyone has any other thoughts grin

auntevil Wed 24-Apr-13 21:28:07

We got the SIPT done on the NHS and have had subsequent sensory integration therapy, also on the NHS, but like Mrslaughan, DS also has dyspraxia.
DS also has EDs, so likewise, it is difficult to know where the hypermobility ends and the dyspraxia begins.

Ineedmorepatience Thu 25-Apr-13 18:06:25

Thanks auntevil, I got an email back today saying that I need to speak to the SENCO and we need to come up with a list of issues that impact on Dd3's daily life, the way she accesses the curriculum and my concerns for when she transfers to secondary. She will then decide if they are the most appropriate service to support her. If I want her to be seen again she has to be referred by the SENCO any way so I will ring tomorrow and get an appointment.

She also said that it is difficult to tell sometimes whether the issues are sensory, related to the hypermobility or Asd related. TBH I am not really bothered where the issues come from, just that they are recognisedhmm

Ineedmorepatience Thu 25-Apr-13 18:07:13

Meant to say I have printed off a sensory checklist so will get ticking over the next few dayssmile

auntevil Thu 25-Apr-13 18:15:41

One of the issues that DS has is tip toe walking. This is a good example of whether it is sensory or hypermobility. The physio sits on the fence for this one. He can put his foot flat to the floor, but his ligaments are tight to support the joints, so maybe it isn't comfortable. Or maybe, as the nerve endings are in the foot, he is getting some kind of sensory feedback from his toes taking in all the pressure.
You're right that ultimately, we just want to curb the toeness of it all, but the physio reckons that if it's sensory, he will just have to grow out of it and that she can only help with the physical side of ensuring that he is capable of walking properly. The rest is just down to me nagging.

Ineedmorepatience Thu 25-Apr-13 18:35:09

Dd3 toe walks sometimes too, she has shortened her achillies tendon now and we are supposed to do stretching execises to enable her to put her heel down. When she walks she puts her whole foot on the ground not heel toe as she should. Her last schools shoes had very strange wear patterns on them. She has orthotics which have reduced the number of times she falls but even with high top trainers she still falls more than she should [imo]

I find the combination of Asd, stubborness and hypermobility makes doing the exercises a nightmare and we have been a bit rubbish lately.

I am more worried about the sensory overload she is going to experience at secondary TBH, with room changes, very formal uniform [she doesnt do buttons] and all the crowded stairs worry me too with how trippy she is.

OMG actually I am terrified at the thought of how she is going to survive!! This year has gone soooo fast and she only has one more year at primary.

Scarysad

auntevil Thu 25-Apr-13 20:52:01

Same here ineedmorepatience, DS1has 1 more year.
Have to laugh, the school I want DS to go to has the most relaxed uniform, polo shirt and sweatshirt, just like primary - no ties or buttons to do.
What I worry about most is organisational issues. He can't even stand 1 side of the front door with his school bags and get out the other side without dropping something, losing something or suddenly remembering something. How the hell is he going to find his way round a bigger school to different rooms and remember the right things and books on the right day without heavy input. If he is reprimanded he will crumble.
Ninja will tell you, I've been panicking for years about this (she's very patient with me). I've even had the paediatrician write me a letter that I can use in an appeal!

PolterGoose Thu 25-Apr-13 21:05:44

My ds is Y5 too. I am getting increasingly anxious about the move to secondary, I can just see so many things going horribly wrong sad and it's stopping me actually doing anything proactive like actually go look at schools, I so need to get my act together.

Ineedmorepatience Thu 25-Apr-13 21:19:36

Yes Dd3 really struggles to be organised too and she would be devastated if she got into trouble.

One of my big concerns as well as the OP is about how strict the school is now that it is an academy.

Dd3 was at a really strict school before and half the time she was frightened to breathe.

Oh I dont know, I wish I could afford to HE sad

Ineedmorepatience Thu 25-Apr-13 21:20:55

Yes Dd3 really struggles to be organised too and she would be devastated if she got into trouble.

One of my big concerns as well as the OP is about how strict the school is now that it is an academy.

Dd3 was at a really strict school before and half the time she was frightened to breathe.

Oh I dont know, I wish I could afford to HE sad

Ineedmorepatience Thu 25-Apr-13 21:22:27

Oooops sad

Ineedmorepatience Mon 29-Apr-13 14:08:17

Just an update, I have spoken to the SENCO who says that it is no problem for her to refer to OT and we are meeting later to chat smile

PolterGoose Mon 29-Apr-13 14:36:05

Excellent smile

MareeyaDolores Mon 29-Apr-13 20:39:14

I am so envy of those with sensory OT locally. The NHS and LA here both say there is 'little convincing evidence of benefit' and so won't release funding for assessments, never mind treatment. angry

lougle Mon 29-Apr-13 20:44:51

Well done, Ineed. You will get there. We all will. Step by step (excuse the pun).

Ineedmorepatience Mon 29-Apr-13 21:39:02

Mareeya I think our OT service is quite good but Dd3 hasnt been accepted for an assessment yet, we have just filled in the referral and they will decide from the information that we included whether or not to see her. LOL

Just keep jumping through the hoops, through the hoops, through the hoops.......grin

MareeyaDolores Mon 29-Apr-13 23:07:37
Ineedmorepatience Tue 30-Apr-13 08:35:10

Lmao @ mareeya grin

KeepOnKeepingOn1 Tue 30-Apr-13 10:35:13

mareeya - I have been told that the NHS in these parts does not do SI therapy although they do test for it hmm.

However, as I am appealing the LA is willing to pay for one hour a week with a private (also has to be post-grad and qualified) OT to provide SIT if DS1 attends m/s rather than OOC indi ss with onsite therapists.

It is amazing what provision appears when you appeal.

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