Here some suggested organisations that offer expert advice on SN.

feeling down again

(13 Posts)
iloveithere Thu 13-Feb-14 15:57:24

DS was making good progress in his behaviour placement. They reccomended a phased return to school. But in the last two week,s i feel like we have gone backwards again.
He has begun hurting others, just getting up from a activity, walking across the class, and scratching, for no apparent reason.

I feel like giving up, just curling up in bed and not getting up again.

sammythemummy Thu 13-Feb-14 16:30:48

Hi ilove

That sounds awful, I'm sorry. It's such a roller coaster with our children sad

Was there a trigger for his behaviour?

I don't really have much advice just that I can understand how frustrating it is.

iloveithere Fri 14-Feb-14 07:42:35

no one can work out a trigger,that the frustrating thing.

thanks for answering, it got a bit frantic here and i had to log off yesterday. feeling a bit better today, hope this feeling continues!

PolterGoose Fri 14-Feb-14 08:30:58

How old is he ilove? What are his issues/diagnosis and what professionals are involved?

My ds exhibits similar behaviour and IME there is always a trigger, but sometimes it's too subtle for staff to see and sometimes the trigger was ages ago and suddenly pops into ds's head. My ds is very sensory defensive and OT sensory interventions work well.

OneInEight Fri 14-Feb-14 08:43:11

I am not clear if the behaviour has only returned when he is back in mainstream? My son's behaviour is much improved since he has been in a very small & friendly BESD school but I am sure it would come back in full force if he returned to mainstream. I am not sure exactly what it is about mainstream he can not cope with - too many people, chaos, unsympathetic teachers - I suspect the accumulation of lots of little things. It might just be suggesting that he needs a more permanent specialist setting.

iloveithere Fri 14-Feb-14 11:32:52

He is not back in mainstream yet, he has always been doing 2 days a week, increasing to 3 after half term, and his teacher at the center suggests a speedy return.
But that was 2 weeks ago, behaviour deteriorated since then.

He has no diagnoses, possibly sensory issues, he has been referred to OT and we are waiting on that. I am not really sure what it means, Polter, can you tell me a bit more about what sensory issues are and what the OT does?

Oh, he is only 5 years old.

PolterGoose Fri 14-Feb-14 11:51:58

There's a good introduction to sensory issues here on the NAS site. Sensory processing difficulties are very common in people with ASDs but can be a standalone diagnosis too.

I posted a link for these fact files recently and you might find some useful strategies in there.

My ds's sensory processing is completely muddled, he's a mix of under and over sensitive to all sorts of things. For example, you could hit him on the head with a brick (and no, I haven't actually done this!) and he wouldn't feel it, but he would feel a light brush past as if he had been violently punched. 2 books really helped me: 'The Out of Sync Child' is a fantastic introduction and has lots of tips, and 'Too Loud Too Bright Too Fast Too Tight' is all about sensory defensiveness.

It's worth remembering that we all have sensory 'needs', think about irritating noises, comfort food, bear hugs, evocative smells, the effect of light, dark and flashing lights, all these things are sensory and affect our mood. For some of us and our children though, this effect is magnified, that's what sensory processing difficulties are.

iloveithere Fri 14-Feb-14 12:22:29

thanks, ill have a read of those links.

RightRoyalPainInTheArse Sun 16-Feb-14 12:51:55

How many are in the placement? Does he have regular breaks, visual timetable, sensory activities, task/ reward, 1-2-1?

iloveithere Sun 16-Feb-14 19:17:24

There are about 7/8 in the class, no idea about the other questions, what goes on there is a mystery to me. All I know is it was working wonders till about two weeks ago, and we seem to have slipped right back. The teacher at the placement said on Friday that he needs a statement, the first person to agree with me on that, so after half term she is going to help me with that. Not sure mainstream school will be happy though.

TigerLightBurning Mon 17-Feb-14 22:57:04

Our OT recommended http://www.sensory-processing-disorder.com

iloveithere Tue 18-Feb-14 09:26:43

We went to a museum yesterday that had lots of sound effects. He got v upset, crying, asking to go home, saying he didn't like the noise. Thing is, he has been there before and was fine about it. Could this be a sensory issue, or just a child being silly?

Julia2132009 Tue 18-Feb-14 11:18:21

That does sound like my boy (same age) and his sensory problems. His sensitivity to things does change (noise, crowds, lights, lots of colours and stuff going on around him). When he's tired or stressed, especially when things have been going badly at school, his nervous system seems to be able to tolerate less, and when he's in a good place, feeling calm, he can cope with a bit more. When he has had a difficult week at school, it definitely affects what he can cope with at the weekend. That's how it seems to me anyway - I'm still trying to understand it all.

Sorry to hear you're having such a hard time. Since Sept my boy has been breaking other children's models at school, throwing and pushing. He is a really lovely person, but it was all just too much for him and he wasn't able to be his lovely self. He has a TA now helping him and he has stopped doing those things and is much happier.

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