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Second child with hyper mobility

(12 Posts)
autumnsmum Thu 29-Aug-13 14:03:00

Hello everyone I hope were all surviving the holidays .i took dd2 to the physio today and she said she is hypermobile .My ds was also diagnosed with this .I wasn't told much apart from to make sure she excercises has anyone else any experience of this ?

2boysnamedR Thu 29-Aug-13 14:07:39

My middle son has dyspraxia so is hypermobile. My baby has been referred to see if is hypermobile too. My ds has a lot of Ocupational therapy - but his issues are a lot wider than pure hypermobilty ( the least of his problems). I hear hypermobilty can be hereditary. Do the give any exercises? Going to send you any? Going to provide a written report?

itsnothingoriginal Thu 29-Aug-13 20:56:57

It's pretty common tbh but often depends on whether there are any other mitigating factors as to how much the hypermobility will impact on the child. Both my kids are hypermobile but it only really affects my dd because it is accompanied by low muscle tone. She is quite unstable because she has weak limbs and trunk together with lax joints.

Your physio will hopefully tell you more but if it affects hands/fine motor skills etc you could ask for an OT referral too.

ArthurPewty Fri 30-Aug-13 08:34:50

Both of mine are hypermobile, as am I.

It can lead to chronic pain as an adult. Or constant leg pains as a child (i had them).

Otherwise, it can be normal and ignored, it just depends on the severity.

2boysnamedR Fri 30-Aug-13 09:08:53

Arther - I didn't know that it caused pain, sorry to hear that. I think there so much I need to learn. Anything that helps with the pain?

ArthurPewty Fri 30-Aug-13 09:30:43

rubbing legs downwards towards the feet. Mom used to have to do that for me for hours as a child, and even last night i went to bed with sore legs after a busy day on my feet.

I also live with chronic pain in my neck from hypermobile joints, after a car wreck 15 years ago where i ended up with whiplash.

2boysnamedR Fri 30-Aug-13 09:39:41

Thanks for that arther - I did read on here that some kids have pain but its normal and they never know what's its like to be pain free. Sorry to hear your in so much constant pain. C

ArthurPewty Fri 30-Aug-13 09:46:47
PolterGoose Fri 30-Aug-13 12:14:25

My ds is hypermobile everywhere except elbows, his OT picked it up and referred him to physio. When physio took a family history I suddenly had an explanation for the extreme and immobilising pains I had suffered as a child/teen which were investigated but never diagnosed confused since my late teens I've had back problems and more recently my knees are terrible. I also have problems with scarring easily and anaesthetic not working (both related to hypermobility), I am also extremely clumsy and my ankles 'go over' frequently. I'm usually wearing at least one support bandage. Ds is mostly affected in his legs and needs massage and painkillers if he's been out walking, however his hands, which are extremely bendy, don't give him pain, so pain isn't inevitable, but this can change.

Strength building exercises are good, decent seating and posture, not over-doing sports, supportive footwear and orthotics for support if needed. We were warned to be careful with trampolining because of the increased risk of injury.

2boysnamedR Fri 30-Aug-13 12:38:22

Thanks for the link above. My eldest fits those criteria for being hypermobile! I always thought he wasn't as he goes to gymnastics since he was three but can't do the splits! Sounds like that's just as well. I think all my kids are hypermobile - but me and sh aren't

autumnsmum Fri 30-Aug-13 16:37:07

Thank you so much everyone a lot to think about

cory Fri 30-Aug-13 20:32:12

Dd had a lot of trouble with chronic pain. It being normal doesn't make it any nicer actually; it just makes you exhausted and anxious. She spent a lot of her junior and secondary school years in a wheelchair but is now much better. Partly because she is old enough to take strong painkillers, which enables her to keep active, which makes the pain less.

Ds is also hypermobile but only went through a short period of pain when he was about 8. He is fine now at 13.

Swimming has been good for both of them.

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