Here some suggested organisations that offer expert advice on SN.

Aba tutoring???

(44 Posts)
WouldBeHarrietVane Mon 03-Jun-13 09:25:02

We don't have a diagnosis yet but am wondering about getting an aba tutor to work with my speech delayed child (just under 2) anyway - I understand it can't do harm if in the end there is no asd issue and may do good if there is?

I have a lovely primary school teacher from another eu country coming to us as an ap for 6 months. Can I get her aba trained and if so, how?

Can I train myself?

salondon Mon 03-Jun-13 09:34:09

Hi Wouldbe

Its a great idea. Other members here have way more experience than I do on ABA. However, my only question would be, who will train the tutor (and you & the Au-pair?) and who will design the program?

PEACH and aba-tutor have training courses. You can look them up.

WouldBeHarrietVane Mon 03-Jun-13 09:45:45

Good questions sa - I have absolutely no idea.

I called peach just now and they said only a qualified aba tutor could work with a child.

I had hoped we could use some of the techniques in advance of a diagnosis, if any - it may still be it is just speech delay.

salondon Mon 03-Jun-13 09:50:18

I have spoken to parents who started ABA/VB without a consultant/supervisor. They did fine. You might eventually need a supervisor as your child makes progress.

However, getting a professional who isn't trained in ABA is as good as having a play therapist. They cant do ABA if they dont know it.. KWIM?

There are trained tutors who will charge you more, but will be able to do work without much supervision and show you and the Au-pair some techniques too. You could hire them

Have you read any books on VB?

WouldBeHarrietVane Mon 03-Jun-13 09:52:43

Sa, thank you so so much for replying. What is vb ?

How do I hire a tutor and would it be very pricey?

WouldBeHarrietVane Mon 03-Jun-13 09:53:38

I was thinking of sending the ap on the initial peach two day course, but they've told me that would be pointless as she isn't aba qualified.

salondon Mon 03-Jun-13 10:19:36

VB is verbal Behaviour.

I dont understand what does ABA qualified mean. Tutors arent expected to have any qualifications.

WouldBeHarrietVane Mon 03-Jun-13 10:53:08

Maybe I misunderstood that, sa. She said the tutor would have to be aba trained and a two day course wasn't enough to enable our ap to work with DS.

salondon Mon 03-Jun-13 10:53:36

yes, that would make sense.

Oh FFS. ABA isn't fucking rocket science. There can be a lot to learn but certainly what is required for a 2 year old is behaviour, imitation and then basic communication and it ISN'T HARD. You just need commitment and some basic guidance.

What planet are Peach on?

WouldBeHarrietVane Mon 03-Jun-13 12:41:32

Thank you do much for saying that, Starlight! I felt like a total idiot for even thinking I could learn to do it when I got off the phone sad

WouldBeHarrietVane Mon 03-Jun-13 13:16:05

Any advice, Starlight? Where can I pick up the basics?

bochead Mon 03-Jun-13 15:04:58

Ambitious about autism - charity based at Treehouse school North London do very basic aba courses.

I've used the courses offered by the organisation above, and a lot of reading up on the subject etc to fantastic effect without employing an "expert". DS has made great progress. I am considering using a qualified ABA tutor via the Caudwell charities programme for various "adolescent issues" in a few years but your child is only 2 ffs.

I honestly think the SN industry sometimes needs to recognise that for many families a child with SN's equals decreased income and earning potential rather than an instant lottery win. [hmmm]

The Cauldwell children's charity offer £2k worth of qualified aba tution, which equates to one hour of the tutors time per week for approximately one school year. It might be worth contacting them, and if you aren't eligible for their programme, finding out who they use to provide this genuinely affordable option. As a charity with VERY limited funds, if previous children they'd funded for this "aba-lite" programme hadn't obtained significant benefit from it, then they wouldn't be offering it iyswim.

ABA is more about genuinely hard graft than rocket science imho. Once you've got your head round the basic principles then working with a 2 year old isn't gonna be THAT complex. Hanen more than words, the VB- Mapp, (& associated literature), Sing and sign, + an ambitous about autism course should be enough to get you started. You can always ask advice re specific issues on here.

(I do btw think you may need more "qualified" help later on, just not aged 2 as the very early stages of any programme are more sheer slog than genius)

bochead Mon 03-Jun-13 15:06:04

I would start with Hannen More than Words. It isn't ABA but it is behavioural. I would say the 'AB' of ABA.

As you get a feel for that you can progress to becoming more effective by being able to analyse both the students progress, and your own effect on that progress. That is the skill, coupled with some syllabus/knowledge of skills that need to be learnt.

I'd say your AP sounds perfect as a potential tutor. A bright, well educated person who doesn't have English as a first language so won't prattle on at the rate of knots and has to consider carefully what is said and its clarity, and 'probably' has more understanding of behavioural approaches than the average UK teacher.

Good syllabus for that age is the ABA play-based curriculum: Early Start Denver Model. You can get the book describing the model and the checklist from Amazon.

The VB-Mapp is more comprehensive and extends to 5/6years old.

I would, start with More than Words, then ESDM and then VB-Mapp.

One reason why ABA is hard for parents to deliver is nothing to do with its complexity but more because as you start to see improvements you tend to want to deliver more hours, as many as possible, and parents can struggle with burn-out and also the blurring of their relationship as therapist/parent.

Often parents begin with a certain no. of hours a week and then once they are sold on the approach from seeing the progress, find justification in hiring a tutor.

SOmetimes hiring a good tutor from the start for just a few hours a week, can be like in-house training. i.e. they deliver 5 hours a week and the parent then delivers 10 hours, copying them iyswim.

www.simplestepsautism.com/

This is a reputable company/resource for online training and curriculum but I have no personal experience of it.

Sarah1611 Mon 03-Jun-13 15:32:25

I'm a qualified ABA tutor (not therapist, so I couldn't lead a programme) feel free to email with any questions! I worked with a little boy who was just over two as his nanny and one of his tutors when he started ABA after an ASD diagnosis

Sarah, what is the difference between tutor and therapist?

I thought they were the same thing.

Also what does 'lead a programme' mean? I led a programme as a parent, though had someone highly qualified (though not BCBA) popping in now and then to direct our programme.

I get the feeling that some organisations/Consultants like to have a certain structure to their home programmes that involve a hierarchy of people which IMO and IME is totally unnecessary, especially if you are funding it yourself.

I would like to suggest OP, that it is very useful to have an independent person pop in and observe your programme now and then to offer tips, correct any mistakes and generally give you more things to think about that you might not have considered, not to mention share their knowledge of resources available.

Also, you should video yourself regularly as you can see much more clearly when the child is engaged and how your behaviour effects theirs.

salondon Mon 03-Jun-13 16:34:35

Ditto bochead - (I do btw think you may need more "qualified" help later on, just not aged 2 as the very early stages of any programme are more sheer slog than genius)

Ditto Starlight - I'd say your AP sounds perfect as a potential tutor. A bright, well educated person who doesn't have English as a first language so won't prattle on at the rate of knots and has to consider carefully what is said and its clarity, and 'probably' has more understanding of behavioural approaches than the average UK teacher.

and

One reason why ABA is hard for parents to deliver is nothing to do with its complexity but more because as you start to see improvements you tend to want to deliver more hours, as many as possible, and parents can struggle with burn-out and also the blurring of their relationship as therapist/parent.

bochead Mon 03-Jun-13 17:24:47

I think the Cauldwell Programme is aimed at giving the parent/school TA advice rather than administering the nitty gritty daily slog themselves iyswim. It does however offer a cost effective method for introducing ABA principles to a family/school.

Boch, I've tried messaging you over the last couple of days but messaging doesn't appear to work for me.

I was wondering how things were going. Clearly you're still 'here' and seemingly still sane!?

bochead Mon 03-Jun-13 17:42:24

I'm still sane but only because everyone around me is "so obviously bonkers that they are impossible to take seriously" (that's DS's quote - not mine lol!).

DS is currently off sick with chicken pox - I'm sure that will become crime of the century at some point in the eyes of the authorities, but in the meantime I'll just plod away with the calamine applications regardless & leave others to their Machiavellian machinations.

I dare say all will become clear before the end of the summer term as regards officialdom, (currently things are as clear as mud). In the meantime we are focusing on our families goals same as always iykwim wink.

Sarah1611 Mon 03-Jun-13 19:55:34

In the set up I was part of (with Peach), we had our psychologist and specially trained ABA therapist Louise (who was wonderful) and she did our training to be ABA tutors. We worked under her, so to speak. She set us specific exercises once every six weeks or so at which time we'd then have an afternoon workshop attended by us all to go over the results of the last few weeks, iron out any problems or answer queries. We'd then be instructed on our next few weeks exercises and then demonstrate and practise them.

I was a tutor, as we're the parents and both sets of grandparents. The child was on 20 hours per week and he did very well on it. As I understand it cost quite a bit to train us and then have Louise come in every few weeks but they saved a lot by not paying for outside tutors (other than me, who was there anyway). Though I would say to think twice before involving immediate family members- there's a lot to be said for someone with an outsider perspective on things.

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