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Anti-Carrot Campaign Manual

(32 Posts)
MareeyaDolores Tue 23-Apr-13 18:00:45

This one.

Now, I think ds1 does need some therapeutic education. Some well-defined, boundaried, professional-led, targetted and evaluated provision. On top of the ordinary, old-fashioned, teacher-y style education and guidance.

But instead he (and other) dc are offered participation in generic emotional literacy guff. No wonder autistic dc are failing to cope. It's like asking deaf dc to listen to daily whole-class birdsong appreciation tapes. In lieu of giving out radio aids, speech therapy, BSL teaching etc. And then blaming them for not putting the effort in (and if it hasn't been done yet, I'm sure it will be, the dc with hideen disabilities are like canaries in the mine succumbing to the early whiffs of downgraded provision)

MareeyaDolores Wed 24-Apr-13 14:19:38

blush

sorry SallyBear and slummy; I quoted HI because it's the only non-ASD disability where I have any first-hand knowledge of educational provisions

(ie what one mainstream school did for one relative back in the day, so obviously not at all representative, but it worked. I think because they did exactly what the audiologist, parent and ToD advised, modified only by what the child said)

Mind you, an educationally unsuitable provision was briefly recommended because of possible 'later emotional impact' of the HI... said relative is a scarily well-educated, successful and obviously well-balanced adult now hmm

MareeyaDolores Wed 24-Apr-13 14:52:29

That Scottish lady's site is indeed very interesting. Now, how to make this into something 'smart' if we ever get a part 3 hmm

MareeyaDolores Wed 24-Apr-13 14:53:29

bearing this caveat in mind, of course

ouryve Wed 24-Apr-13 14:58:12

DS1 has actually volunteered himself to participate in play therapy, in the past. It got him out of lessons, which is what he wanted. He was taught a few counting and breathing techniques, which he could tell me all about, but as soon as he got into a situation when he needed them was unable to apply them because the part of his brain that accesses that kind of information completely switches off.

I think a lot of the behavioural and emotional issues in ASD are so primal that they're impossible to crack with any artificial behavioural modification.

ouryve Wed 24-Apr-13 15:57:29

I like the idea of the responsibility pie chart.

MareeyaDolores Fri 26-Apr-13 21:21:07

Ouryve, I think you're right about the 'reflex' stuff being really hard to modify, and near-impossible to eliminate. Our aim here is to modestly reduce the harmful behaviours, and channel the excess emotional energy but even that's a challenge.

What makes me sad though, isn't that, it's the general and manifest failure to make mini modifications that would give the dc have more chance of sometimes applying the strategies they know.

MareeyaDolores Fri 26-Apr-13 21:21:54

<wants a real pie now>

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