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How to get healthy options into DS2 who has a restrictive diet

(36 Posts)
dietstartstmoz Fri 08-Mar-13 11:29:37

Following on from the banana bread recipe on the support thread, which I will make later, I could do with some tips on how to get healthier options into DS2. He has HFA and only eats a small handful of things, he eats very little fruit and veg and very little meat, eggs etc.
Has anyone got some tips on how to hide some healthier options into food?
My only tip is to puree carrots and other veg into pizza base sauce to make our own pizzas.
I am lacking in inspiration and creativity!

zzzzz Fri 08-Mar-13 23:36:57
zzzzz Fri 08-Mar-13 23:36:25

Well there's also

http://www.lakeland.co.uk/16693/Egg-Slicer

And

http://www.lakeland.co.uk/12750/OXO-Good-Grips-Strawberry-Huller

If you get inspired.

PolterGoose Fri 08-Mar-13 23:14:59

hazey when you see the dietician push them to prescribe you the on prescription vitamin and mineral powder, it is very complete and pineapple flavour so you can disguise it in juice.

PolterGoose Fri 08-Mar-13 23:11:47

Marking place as ds is another food refuser.

I'm going to buy one of those apple gadgets like zzzzz's now ds has decided he likes apple again...

Unfortunately ds's taste buds are so astute he will spot even the most minuscule contaminant, so hiding stuff is just not an option for us, and as his range is so limited I can't risk him abandoning another food.

However... we are having our very own Food Adventure this weekend. Watch this space grin

zzzzz Fri 08-Mar-13 23:11:38

Every cloud grin

hazeyjane Fri 08-Mar-13 23:01:39

That might be handy, considering it can take days for him to do a poo!

zzzzz Fri 08-Mar-13 22:57:52

Boots do them in little tubs (old style hair gel size). They're about £1 a bath like that though. I'd buy a pot or 2 and see if it makes a difference, before buying loads. I guess the more depleted you are the more the impact???

Nb don't let him drink the bath water, it's a laxative! shock grin

hazeyjane Fri 08-Mar-13 22:46:09

Epsom salts! Have just had a google, looks very interesting, can I just get the in the chemist?

I have struggled with omega 3, and haven't found a supplement that he will take. He has 6 lots of meds a day, and he is not great with taking them, which is why I mix the vit drops in with juice.

He won't eat pastry, I did try making my own 'sausages', with all sorts mixed into them, but they weren't popular!

Sorry op, I feel a bit bad about hijacking your thread.

zzzzz Fri 08-Mar-13 22:37:48

Abidec, and he has it from a syringe in the morning (he doesn't sleep if we give it in the evening), it is one of the few things that is truly non-negotiable.

We also do Epsom salts baths sporadically (I can't do routine.... hmm ).

Omega oil I add to his spag Bol every so often (though have run out atm) it's really fishy so challenging for all of us.

He behaves very differently when supplemented. I honestly wouldn't believe it unless I had seen it myself.

With abidec and omega oil the effects are same day, with the Epsom salts sometimes its the second or third bath. All change quality and depth of communication.

MERLYPUSS Fri 08-Mar-13 22:28:40

Would he eat home made sausage roll/pasty? My mum used to fry onions and blended veg, mix it with the sos mix and wrap in pastry for the whole family. She would be able to disguise most stuff in there - bless her.

hazeyjane Fri 08-Mar-13 22:21:13

Which supplements do you use, zzzzz? I add baby vitamin drops to watered down juice, but is there something better I could be giving him?

I will try the morphing thing, and be very gradual. food like pasta gives him the heebie jeebies, if I could disguise it as cake, it would be fine!

zzzzz Fri 08-Mar-13 21:59:21

I think it's all bout morphing what's ok to what you want him to eat.

So something like

Cake morphed to flatter round cake morphed to pancake morphed to pancakes with ever more egg morphed to omelette shock morphed to scrambled eggs faint with joy you are da Mama

Chipolata sausages are good, morph through to pasta tossed with chipolata and you are on your way to eating out at an Italian restaurant.

Philadelphia can be slowly doped into humous or "dip"

Ds stopped eating almost everything last summer and we are slowly working our way back. I suspect it will happen several times while he grows. For us supplements have been a huge boon, though I was a little angry with the paediatrician when he told me they were recommended for all small children. When I think of all the times I brought up diet for ds and no one said anything!

ouryve Fri 08-Mar-13 21:57:48

Fruit and veg are DS2's brick wall.

He has ready brek for breakfast, every day and we mix half a pot of organix fruit puree in to sweeten it (it has more fruit solids and less juice than other brands)

He has decided he likes apples - cooked or raw, though they tend to go straight through him so he only gets them a couple of times a week. He'll also happily eat berries and blackcurrants cooked with the apples

He loves rhubarb crumble. And fresh blueberry muffins. And banana bread. Just cake in general!!! He often asks for cak if he knows or suspects there's some in the house.

We can sneak a small spoonful of tomatoey pasta sauce onto his chips instead of ketchup, if we're having pasta (which he can't eat without gagging, even when he tries)

Fruitus bars - pretty much just dried fruit and oats.

He's been through phases where he'll tolerate small amounts of veg (eg spinach) cut small, in an omelette.

We do the familiarisation thing, too. He'll now happily completely blank a piece of carrot on his plate, instead of rejecting the entire meal grin

hazeyjane Fri 08-Mar-13 21:55:59

Ooh, I have a lovely polenta lemon cake recipe, if you are interested, I can dig out the recipe. I did actually try that one with ds, but it must the the only cake he wouldn't eat! Dd love it though, it makes a really nice pudding with Greek yoghurt.

silverfrog Fri 08-Mar-13 21:51:07

nigella's clementine cake is gf, and uses ground almonds in place of flour.

polenta is also a good gf option. I have eaten (many blush) polenta cakes, but never made one. I have used polenta for a quick supper though - make up and boil/stir as per pack instructions, then mix in some grated cheese (and maybe the odd bit of finely chopped veg if tolerated), then pour onto plate/dish and leave to cool to set. (20 mins?)

then slice up into fingers/wedges, and shallow fry until it turns a bit golden.

yummy.

porridgeLover Fri 08-Mar-13 21:47:47

I agree with Ineedmorepatience about the amount of exposure needed.
I would have heard a figure of over 20 but there you go.

My own experience with DS has been similar.....he had a appalling diet about which I would get extremely stressed....until I decided that I wasn't doing that anymore.

I started about 2 years ago, set a goal of one new food at a time. I wanted him to eat plain roast chicken. Started with tolerating it on his plate, moving to putting it on his fork and sniffing it, then 'try it in your mouth and put it back on your plate if you dont want it'.
Eventually, and v-e-r-y slowly, he tolerated and then started eating plain chicken. Yeah!
I've used the same routine with lots of other foods, and while he is still very 'faddy', he is much much better. And now he trusts me that if I introduce something new, he only has to try it, not eat it regardless.
Our latest has been success eating plain rice (sounds ridiculous to celebrate that as a goal but we will never be stuck if we are out, and hungry, near a Chinese now).

hazeyjane Fri 08-Mar-13 21:43:49

Ground nuts in cake is a good idea, I have a recipe somewhere for hazelnut cake, which might even be gf, so good for dd1 too!

Off to google microwave crisp thingy, more for dd's than ds, who can't really manage crisps, as they make him choke.

silverfrog Fri 08-Mar-13 21:33:28

still cake, but beetroot makes a good cake too smile

can he have nuts? ground nuts in place of flour also very nutrient rich.

crisps - have you tried eg a micorwave crisp gadget and making your own vegetable crisps? I got my then teenage dss eating loads of veg he would otherwise have turned his nose up at by slicing thinly and turning into crisps...

hazeyjane Fri 08-Mar-13 21:27:06

Hmm, some tips my way would be great (I'll start my own thread, rather than hijack, if you'd rather!)

Ds eats

Crackers
Dairylea/Philadelphia
Chipolata sausage
Toast+marmite or jam
Cake (most varietiesblush
Biscuits (ditto)
Sweetcorn
Apple
Petit filous
Fruit pouches
Organic crisps
Chips

That's it. We have been referred to a dietician, and try to put different foods in front of him, but he gets upset if there is something he doesn't like the look of anywhere near him. I make banana bread and courgette cake, but could do with some other suggestions!

zzzzz Fri 08-Mar-13 21:17:44

This gizmo has sent apple consumption through the roof in the zzzzz household.

www.lakeland.co.uk/AllProductReviews.action?productId=13181

ScramblyEgg Fri 08-Mar-13 20:57:19

How about mixing other veg in with the mash, like carrot or sweet potato.

Also what Ellen said about raw carrots - DS will eat lots of veg raw that he won't touch cooked, including peas & sweetcorn straight from freezer.

dietstartstmoz Fri 08-Mar-13 20:20:47

Thanks for the tips, i will try some of these. He doesnt do nuggets or fish!

EllenJaneisstillnotmyname Fri 08-Mar-13 19:53:14

Nutritionally you've got quite a good mix, agree with zzzzz Some apples and grapes, will he drink juice? Could you try occasional fruit smoothies blended until smooth with apple or orange juice as the base? He's having cheese on toast and milk so some dairy and protein. How about good quality chicken nuggets to increase the protein? Fish fingers? Or is that too out there? Veg is harder, caring carrot sticks? grin Mine will eat raw carrots but not cooked. I have a veg chopper thingy that I chop mushrooms up and hide them in mince, perhaps you could chop up a small floret of cooked broccoli very finely and hide it in the pesto? Jelly can be made with fruit juice.

Ineedmorepatience Fri 08-Mar-13 18:02:28

Dont know if you ever saw Tanya Byron on House of Tiny Tearaways but she said a child with food issues needs to see a new food upto 20 times before it becomes familiar.

I have used the familiarisation technique with Dd3 and I can say it does help to take the fear out of new foods.

Good lucksmile

dietstartstmoz Fri 08-Mar-13 17:46:37

Thanks-I will keep offering new things and putting them out. I have made banana bread-but he wont eat it! Will perservere.

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