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DD2 (Yr 1) told me today that she is going to do phonics with Yr R tomorrow...

(16 Posts)
Ineedmorepatience Tue 26-Feb-13 19:08:18

How funny lougle.

I got sent home with lines to write from a needle work lesson when I was 5 or 6, the lines were "I must not swear in needle work"grin

Allegedly I couldnt thread my needle and threw it down on the table and said "Fuck it". This was straw hat type private school. Lol.
My mum was very blush

PolterGoose Tue 26-Feb-13 19:02:30

grin

lougle Tue 26-Feb-13 10:25:21

Thank you, you're all a lovely lot. Really not suitable for MN with it's nest of vipers rep wink

DD1 came out of school yesterday with a plaster on a finger. A helper had stabbed her in sewing shock

I said 'what did you say??' and she said 'I didn't say anything, I did this <sucks air through teeth>'. I did laugh grin

amumtothree Tue 26-Feb-13 08:29:23

My school also mixes the ks1 years for phonics. Because it's always been like that the children don't seem to mind or even notice.

Lougle I'm glad it's going well with the new school, a lovely ht can make a real difference.

Handywoman Mon 25-Feb-13 22:56:42

I'm with zzzz I reckon you are playing this just right. I think it takes at least half a term for teachers to get to know a child, and her teacher seems remarkably perceptive. The key thing is your dd2 sounds happy, which means you have whatever time you need.

In my girls' school YR and Y1 mix for some sessions. I don't think it's at all unusual.

PolterGoose Mon 25-Feb-13 22:43:00

Agree with zzzzz

I think it is fab that school don't need you to point out the obvious and that they have so quickly shown how responsive they are to an individual child's needs envy

(Ds's school stream across year groups too)

Ineedmorepatience Mon 25-Feb-13 22:38:04

I agree that you should maybe sit back for a while, the new teacher seems to be getting to know her and seeing where her weaknesses are.

You are really good at spotting when your Dd2 is getting stressed so if that happens you can step in then.

When she has been there a while, book an appointment with her and have a good chat.

Good lucksmile

zzzzz Mon 25-Feb-13 22:36:31

I think you are playing things just right, and dd is happy at school lougle !!!! You rescued her. You should be bloody proud of yourself.

lougle Mon 25-Feb-13 22:31:51

But I'm hoping it is all done without me having to come above the 'radar' so to speak. I don't want to push just yet, because I don't know if DD2 does have additional needs or if she's just a bit behind in a few areas....it's not clear. I'd rather wait and see how her teacher feels in a few weeks, I think.

lougle Mon 25-Feb-13 22:30:24

I think I'm hoping that it's a case of the teacher noticing that all is not as it seems with DD2. She already put her down to book band 2 from the book band 5 she was on at old school -which was fine, because she decodes quite well but I don't think she comprehends as well, which the teacher said she also felt. She's moved up to a band 3 now.

I'm hopeful that this teacher is really going to 'get' DD2 and not just assume that she's doing fine because she agrees with whatever she says.

Ineedmorepatience Mon 25-Feb-13 22:29:16

Thats great news lougle, the HT sounds lovely.

I hope it continues to go wellsmile

zzzzz Mon 25-Feb-13 22:26:53

I'd say the message was for you too. What a nice man trying to make you both feel you did well. smile

lougle Mon 25-Feb-13 22:22:44

She seems absolutely unfazed by it. Completely matter of fact, hasn't twigged, or isn't bothered, that Yr R is a 'younger' year group. Let's face it, 2 weeks later and she'd be Yr R - certainly if she'd been born on time.

She's still fine with her new school smile. She's still getting tummy ache, including waking her in the night, but she wants to go to school despite it, rather than using it as a reason not to go to school, so that's wonderful.

Her new HT spoke to her today as we walked into the school and she said she had been for a blood test. He was quite surprised and said 'goodness, that's keen. I said 'oh yes, we had to go to <town 10 miles away> He replied to DD2 'And still spot on time for school! Aren't you organised?' I think the message may have actually been for me, which was comforting, given that he told me before she started, that the old HT had telephoned him to share her concerns with him.

zzzzz Mon 25-Feb-13 22:22:10

Ours all shift around R up to Y2.

Ineedmorepatience Mon 25-Feb-13 22:14:27

Hi lougle there is a school near to me that sets across key stage one for phonics, they do RML so I guess it is the most effective way of doing it.

Is your Dd2 ok about it? So long as it isnt stressing her I should think it will be good.

Is she ok at her new school still?

lougle Mon 25-Feb-13 22:10:17

DD2 moved school 3 weeks ago. She was doing phonics in her class, although they seem to split the children across the classes, I presume according to ability. Her cousin comes into her new class for phonics, and her cousin is quite good, I think.

Today, DD2 came out of school and said 'Mum, tomorrow I'm doing phonics with Turtles class in Yr R'

Do you think her teacher is noticing that she isn't as secure in her phonics as she might appear?

I'm torn between mentioning it to the teacher and asking or seeing it as a natural part of differentiation and waiting for the teacher to mention it to me?

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