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daily mail article - ABA

(25 Posts)
nupurkumarika Mon 04-Feb-13 21:31:57

what perceptionreality has pointed out is so true and OMG....made me laugh so horribly

perceptionreality Mon 04-Feb-13 21:29:03

'The most dangerous person of all is the right on types endemic in the NHS/Social Services who bangs on about using a 'social model' which is usually shorthand for going to a lot of meetings, nodding sympathetically, using jargon and writing vague reports telling everyone else what to do.'

Yes, so true.

silverfrog Fri 01-Feb-13 19:07:14

Was just thinking about that the other day!

Bit hectic at the mo, as have just re-started OU, and ds still isn't sleeping much at all, by give me a couple of weeks and we'll sort something out!

When are our babies gonna have a playdate?

Ah. well I on the other hand post all over, some sense, some less sense. However I like to consider myself becoming 'refined'!!!

silverfrog Fri 01-Feb-13 18:51:02

grin thanks (I think wink)

tis probably because I've not been around so much - quality, not quantity wink

moondog Fri 01-Feb-13 18:47:24

'God, I hate the way that 'acceptance' has come to mean 'must not try to change anythign or improve, or realise potential'

So true Silver (you are speaking so much sense these days-not that you don't usually but you are coming out with some gems).

The most dangerous person of all is the right on types endemic in the NHS/Social Services who bangs on about using a 'social model' which is usually shorthand for going to a lot of meetings, nodding sympathetically, using jargon and writing vague reports telling everyone else what to do.

hmm

perceptionreality Fri 01-Feb-13 17:24:57

The problem with TEACCH is that there is no curriculum, no teaching the child to imitate and no way to measure progress. It would have been no good for my dd when she was 2/3. It is no good for children who don't already have the skills in place which will enable them to sit down and concentrate for at least a short time.

The other problem though, is that if a provision says that it uses TEACCH then it is regarded as ASD specific by a tribunal and hard to fight against. There are schools in London endorsed by the NAS who have a very good reputation, but some parents feel their child isn't making progress there because they need something more hands on like ABA. Unfortunately it's still hard to win in that situation.

googlyeyes Fri 01-Feb-13 16:52:24

TEACCH is pretty damn far from ABA!

For a start TEACCH believes in adapting the environment to the child and ABA believes the polar opposite

TEACHH isn't ABA, PECs on the other hand IS ABA when done properly, which unfortunately is pretty rare.

salondon Fri 01-Feb-13 16:43:21

My portage worker (who I talked about in this thread as being open to ABA) said to me that the Borough practices ABA because we have TEACCH & PECS. I know nothing about TEACCH. However I am reading more and more that TEACCH isnt the way to go.

sickofsocalledexperts Fri 01-Feb-13 16:29:19

Btw Zumba, I wouldn't give it to the school as in "here is proof of AbA's scientific credentials" but more just as a casual "for your information, some background on ABA in today's mail"

sickofsocalledexperts Fri 01-Feb-13 16:23:27

I would use he Daily Mail article with the school yes, particularly if part of their problem is they just ont know what it is and think it's new/wacky. No press article is ever 100% good (that would be an advert) but I am relly pleased o see this in a paper in such a massive circulation. This kind if thing is how the zeitgeist gets changed

perceptionreality Fri 01-Feb-13 13:07:44

At our tribunal, the LEA tried to use a clipping from a newspaper about ABA to support their case grin

perceptionreality Fri 01-Feb-13 13:05:42

Nobody should ever use the DM as an example ever imho grin

I agree with Starlight - the article seems stupid and irrelevant. There is nothing outlandish about ABA - it's common sense that intensive teaching and breaking things down into small steps, together with reinforcement will do far more for a child with a severe communication disorder and learning disability than a lets wait and see how they turn out approach.

As much as I hope ABA becomes more accepted, I strongly suspect it will never be easy to access as long as TEACCH is around - 1. cheaper, 2. no therapy involved - therefore no committed therapists required to put it in place.

I do think that it is actually not easy to find great therapists (even though we've had some really talented ones) - it's so important to have the right people.

zumbaleena Fri 01-Feb-13 12:54:01

Thanks

No. Don't send them DM articles to back up your point.

Send them easy to read research or a basic common sense introduction.

zumbaleena Fri 01-Feb-13 12:45:48

I know sickof what you mean. Would you advise sending the link to this article to school. They have just opened to aba and agreed to try it out. The article does promote,aba but also denigrates it in the latter half.

sickofsocalledexperts Fri 01-Feb-13 11:50:05

Agreed. The Mail article is a bit "curey" but I think v helpful overall in term of awareness of ABA. Remember there is still a large chunk of the population that only gives credence to a thing when it has been in the papers. I m v excited about it!

silverfrog Fri 01-Feb-13 11:24:52

god, I hate the way that 'acceptance' has come to mean 'must not try to change anythign or improve, or realise potential'

I completely accept that dd1 is severely disabled.

I will fight for, and with, her for the rest of my days to help her get the most out of life, and be the best that she can.

just as I will for dd2 and ds.

zumbaleena Fri 01-Feb-13 11:17:36

exactly....starlight....we as parents should atleast give a good try to few therapies for a few years before we give up completely

I'll not accept my ASD ds the way he is any more than I'll accept my NT 4yr old dd the way she is.

Do I really want her scratching her peers because they won't do what she says? Do I want her kicking and screaming in the queue at sainsbury's because it is too slow, when she is 34?
Do I want her throwing her food at her other people when she is 23?

Why is it okay to treat/educate her out of these behaviours, but cruel to do the same for my disabled son?

zumbaleena Fri 01-Feb-13 11:08:53

also wondering...about people who still believe that autism cannot be treated! just accept them the way they are

It's a stupid article imo.

Blah blah blah cure, followed by 'it's just a placebo'.

Neither of which make any sense or are factually correct imo.

zumbaleena Fri 01-Feb-13 10:45:56

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2271608/Can-really-cure-child-autism-With-parental-devotion-pioneering-treatment-Jamies-behaviour-transformed-So-experts-sceptical.html?

ALSO CHECK http://www.cambridgeautism.com for the child's full story

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