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Another encouraging story about ABA in a mainstream newspaper

(17 Posts)
moondog Fri 01-Feb-13 07:33:53
sickofsocalledexperts Fri 01-Feb-13 08:27:37

Hooray! Don't think it was in the actual paper, just online? But still fab! Thanks moondog

sickofsocalledexperts Fri 01-Feb-13 08:33:06

When you say "another" good story, I am thinking this is the first time I have seen ABA mentioned in a mainstream paper? I think there was another article in the Mail many years ago, but in that one they mentioned ABA in passing but the main thrust of the article was "miracle diets". Have I missed other articles?

PipinJo Fri 01-Feb-13 08:51:14

Does he still have ABA and 1:1? Or is he totally ind in school now?
This is the second one I have seen in my many years of ABA too.

sickofsocalledexperts Fri 01-Feb-13 08:53:07

Ooh it is in the paper, full double page spread! I think the kid is now fully independent in school, bit of a "cure" story!

salondon Fri 01-Feb-13 08:56:32

Don't know what to say. We are about to start ABA and hope & believe it will help our child.

sickofsocalledexperts Fri 01-Feb-13 08:59:47

Everyone with sceptical SEncos or school staff should take this article into school "just for info"

An odd thing happens when something gets into the papers - "well if it's in the paper, there must be something to it"

PipinJo Fri 01-Feb-13 09:02:02

Oh wow!!!
Ds never had mercury but had rubbish fine motor too and is now excellent at drawing (imitation down to ABA).
Ds full time in MS before 7yrs old now 8yrs...but to be totally ind double wow!!

sickofsocalledexperts Fri 01-Feb-13 09:03:53

Ah he may still have an LSA

sickofsocalledexperts Fri 01-Feb-13 09:30:57

I don't believe ABA can cure at all, SAlondon - but it is, by a very long chalk, the quickest way I have seen of getting a kid to his or her full potential. Some other educational methods in this country may not do that at all, imho and ime.

I don't know about the mercury pill mentioned in article - sounds a bit like bunkum to me, but I'm deeply cynical! And how on earth can they say it had an effect, when they were already doing intensive 40 hour a week ABA? Why is everyone so quick to attribute success to the wacky, untested methods, rather than to scientifically-proven methods such as ABA? Pisses me off!

salondon Fri 01-Feb-13 15:14:09

The reason I dont know what to say is that the article talks of placebo effect and pills..

sickofsocalledexperts Fri 01-Feb-13 16:42:35

I don't think the placebo effect is relevant in the case of ABA, Salondon: there is just too much data collected. It's not like other interventions, which base their so-called "cures" on subjective evidence from hopeful mums. In fact I'm sure I'll be flamed but I'd put pretty much every other intervention in the latter category. You'll see from the independent site Research Autism that the only 2 interventions with 3 ticks (meaning they are backed up by a very significant and peer-reviewed body of research) are ABA and melatonin.

salondon Fri 01-Feb-13 16:45:54

sickOf - I agree.. But the article talks about it nonetheless.. Its better than nothing. However, there are people out there who will read it and get a -ve impression about ABA from the article.

Is no publicity better than -ve publicity?

sickofsocalledexperts Fri 01-Feb-13 16:48:52

I think the article is positive. First, because there has been not so much as a mention of ABA in a mass circulation paper in this country for years (or ever? and secondly because the vast thrust of the article is positive - in fact probably TOO positive, as I dont believe ABA can cure, only greatly improve.

salondon Fri 01-Feb-13 17:15:08

As usual, didnt explain myself too well. I meant that the "curing" to some people will mean "ah, there they go again. Wanting to cure Autism with this magical therapy". Instead if it said "ABA improves children's chances of a proper education" I would have felt better.. I am nitpicking now..

sickofsocalledexperts Fri 01-Feb-13 17:53:57

Oh I see what you mean SAlondon. Unfortunately "cure" fits better in a headline than "gradual but significant progress " . Still v exciting to see it in paper. Maybe the tide is turning? I am an optimist though!

moondog Fri 01-Feb-13 18:38:50

Sickof, I've seen others but, if it doesn't sound too pompous, I am usually reading academic accounts of the efficacy and not ones in papers.

Having said that though, you are so right.
If it's in the paper, people take note.
More folk are leafing through the Mail of an afternoon than the Journal of Applied Behaviour Analysis.

grin

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