Too early to be considering dyslexia?

(11 Posts)
Cherubneddy1 Tue 13-Sep-16 21:25:05

My daughter is just 5 and has started in Year 1. Since the middle of reception I have wondered whether there is something more going on with her than just finding reading difficult. In reception, her teacher commented that she struggled to retain learning; she can see the same word repeatedly on consecutive pages and still not recognise it, after sounding it out. It took her ages to learn all her phonics, and even longer to work out how to 'blend' sounds to read.

She has just moved schools and her teacher spoke to me today about how behind her peers she is with reading. I've been shocked to find out she seems to have forgotten what she did know at the end of last year. She was struggling to recognise 'n' today. I wonder if this is our fault though, as I was in hospital for a month over summer, and poor DH struggled to keep everything together and reading was NOT a priority.

And she absolutely HATES reading. We have to force her or bribe her to sit down to read. And she often just cries when we make her look at a book. She finds it so stressful (as do we.). We've tried reading apps, which seem to really help at the time, but she forgets what she's learned ( such as how 'ai' sounds) by the time we see it in a book, despite her seeing it repeatedly 10 mins earlier.

She's left handed which her teacher says makes dyslexia more likely too. We've always affectionately called her a 'dizzy daydream' as she is forgetful and vague all the time, wondering if this could be related though?

Any thoughts? Is it too early to see if she can be assessed? Who would do it? I'm having a proper meeting with the school next week to discuss.

NightNightBadger19962 Tue 13-Sep-16 21:39:56

Just popped on to say in year 7 school advised us that getting a visual processing assessment by an optometrist (available locally at a few specialist opticians) was the first step. It turned out she had a specific problem with horizontal tracking - we have a list of games etc to help work on it, and she has some special glasses (that look like normal ones). Also your school may be able to do a screening test (not sure what age this recommended from though). My dd disliked reading too, and performed worse in tests when under time pressure than in class. It helps her if there is less text on the page (uses a kindle) and if worksheets etc are not cluttered/busy, as she finds it hard to pick information out. Useful games for her specific problem are jigsaws, spot the difference, where's wally, little things app, also picking out and circling all the 'a's' on a page! Or any other letter. Good luck.

Gingernut81 Tue 13-Sep-16 21:40:12

We have a computer programme at our school called Lucid which is a very vague test - it highlights areas of weakness rather than diagnose dyslexia. However if the results were very poor we'd advise a dyslexc test. I've got a feeling that she may still be too young for formal testing but don't hold me to that.

Have you tried doing her work on coloured paper (cream/buff is meant to be good) or using a coloured overlay when reading? Could be worth a try & then at least you know, the colours are meant to help words stay still rather than moving.

Theworldsgonemad Tue 13-Sep-16 21:51:35

I don't think it's to young op, my son was diagnosed at that age. I took him to the Helen Arkell dyslexia centre for an assessment. They produced a report for us and teachers to use to help him.
It can be tough as well as frustrating for them in school, especially as they get older and realise others are so far ahead in certain aspects, especially reading.
Follow your instincts and get your Dd assessed.

dublingirl48653 Tue 13-Sep-16 21:53:01

I am an educ psychologist
we do not assess for dyslexia before the age of 8

Jakadaal Tue 13-Sep-16 21:55:46

School refused to accept that dd had a problem and that it was all behaviour relating to the fact she was adopted. We finally took her to Dyslexia Action aged 7 for assessment which revealed numerous issues including dyslexia. School finally sat up and took notice when I started her with weekly lessons with dyslexia action as it involved taking her out of school over a lunchtime.

Dd is now in a special school and is starting her GCSEs. I have never forgiven her primary school for refusing to take both her and us seriously

Jakadaal Tue 13-Sep-16 21:56:45

School refused to accept that dd had a problem and that it was all behaviour relating to the fact she was adopted. We finally took her to Dyslexia Action aged 7 for assessment which revealed numerous issues including dyslexia. School finally sat up and took notice when I started her with weekly lessons with dyslexia action as it involved taking her out of school over a lunchtime.

Dd is now in a special school and is starting her GCSEs. I have never forgiven her primary school for refusing to take both her and us seriously

Jellykat Tue 13-Sep-16 22:07:05

Not sure about Dyslexia, but DS2 started being assessed for Dyspraxia in Reception year.

Cherubneddy1 Tue 13-Sep-16 22:11:16

Thanks so much for all your replies everyone. Some great advice there. I agree I need to trust my instincts; I know it's so, so early to consider it, but I do feel something just isn't quite right. The amount of time we spend reading with her is wholly disproportionate to the progress she has(Nt) made. She's generally a very bright girl, we thought she would do well at school, it's been a real surprise.

There's no way I'll leave seeking an assessment until she's 8, if things don't improve though confused

Didiplanthis Wed 14-Sep-16 19:39:38

Just came back from ed psych today ! My Dd is nearly 7. Amongst other things we were told she has dyslexic tendencies but they would not formally diagnose it yet as some of the tests are for things that would be normal at this age anyway. She has been definitively diagnosed with other issues which are affecting her learning which we can address now however so it may be worth pursuing if you are worried things aren't right. We had similar issues very very bright but very little progress. We sat it out in year 1 but things weren't picking up so thought we had best look further as her confidence is already in tatters.

Mrssigns Mon 19-Sep-16 08:56:09

My dd is dyslexic and she also has very poor working memory, which means that she struggles to retain what she has learnt. So she is taught something, gets it and then 10 minutes later forgets it! It's like working with a goldfish !! Her ed pysch report and the senco at school have given us lots of strategies though to get stuff into her long term memory and once there it is secure. Do some reading on short term/working memory as there are games you can do now that can help

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