Moving a statement from England to Scotland

(4 Posts)
googleplex10 Tue 26-Jul-16 16:23:13

We're considering a move and have one DC with a statement for severe dyslexia. It's about to be changed to an EHCP.

Does anyone have any experience of moving and getting support in Scotland? Is there a similar set up in Scotland and would his statement/EHCP be recognised and converted into the Scottish equivalent or would it be more paperwork/negotiation?

JudyCoolibar Tue 26-Jul-16 23:18:33

There is an equivalent in Scotland, but I'm afraid I have no idea of the procedure involved. There's some information here - www.educationscotland.gov.uk/inclusionandequalities/additionalsupportforlearning/

blaeberry Wed 27-Jul-16 21:38:59

The nearest equivalent in Scotland is a Co-ordinated Support Plan (CSP); this is the only legal ASN document (ASN = additional support need = SEN). Very few children have a CSP and I don't see that you would get one for dyslexia alone as to get a CSP you need to require help from more than one agency (i.e. education and the NHS or social work). What you are more likely to get is a 'Child's Plan'. This is new (they only need to be in place from this August) so LAs are still working out how to operate them. A Child's Plan lays out what support your dc needs according to a bunch of 'wellbeing indicators' don't ask me what I think of those. They are unlikely to be very specific in terms of support required and if you are unhappy or think agreed support is not being provided then you have to go through the council complaints procedure not an independent tribunal. What it boils down to is support is very dependent on the school and LA.

googleplex10 Wed 27-Jul-16 21:55:39

Thank you for your replies both.

So it's not really worth bothering with? We're about to take him out of school anyway as we're unhappy with the education he's been receiving and so will probably lose it. I was just concerned that we may be shooting ourselves in the foot if we jump too soon.

It looks like it wouldn't be worth much in Scotland (hasn't been worth much in England TBH) so we'd be best off making our own plans.

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now