Dysgraphia - How to get tested?

(17 Posts)

If anyone is in Greater Manchester, I know a really good handwriting tutor. She is a trained and experienced paediatric OT but now working as a tutor. She has helped lots of students tremendously. That doesn't mean to say, of course, that some students shouldn't use computers etc as their primary means of writing, just that if there are any handwriting improvements that can be made, she would be able to help with it IYSWIM. PM me if you want details

amistillsexy Tue 01-Oct-13 22:12:49

Bundaberg believe me, it is not for want of trying. We have worn out the whips trying to flog this particular dead horse. Over the years, several different strategies (including those specifically aimed at children with dysgraphia, even prior to this diagnosis) have been used, to no avail.

aciddrops, I think that's how our OT sees it, DS's handwriting is barely functional. He mixes upper and lower case letters, and cannot control the sizes of letters at all. Watching him write is like watching someone walk on a broken leg (to use your wheelchair analogy).

TheArticFunky, have you asked about OT for your DS?

aciddrops Tue 01-Oct-13 21:50:33

I was a bit surprised at how categorical she was about it being pointless to try to do anything about it. I assume it's because he is so bad that nothing will help
I'm coming to the same conclusion for my DS. It is heart wrenching watching him struggle to write. You wouldn't force a person who needed a wheelchair to walk.

bundaberg Tue 01-Oct-13 20:02:41

really? it might be worth getting a second opinion? from what i've read online there are various strategies used to try and help children with it... personally I think i'd feel awful if I didn't at least try some of them even if that was alongside using a laptop or whatever as well

amistillsexy Tue 01-Oct-13 19:57:21

I asked for an OT assessment at DS's last annual review, since we spent nearly half the time discussing his handwriting and whether it was a 'won't do' or a 'can't do' problem.
In the end, I pointed out we'd been discussing this every year for the last 5 years, and I was flagging up concerns about his lack of mark-making in private nursery at the age of 18 months (I actually moved nurseries due to this (an the Angel Delight for puddings grin), so it was about time something more was done.
We had the OT assessment two weeks ago, and she diagnosed dysgraphia. She said it is not even worth him doing any exercises-it's flogging a dead horse- and he's best learning to use technology instead shock.
I was a bit surprised at how categorical she was about it being pointless to try to do anything about it. I assume it's because he is so bad that nothing will help sad

bundaberg Tue 01-Oct-13 19:49:03

i've been googling and read online that you need an assessment from a behavioural optometrist to get/help get a diagnosis. I think we might see if we can find one for DS1 to go to!

aciddrops Tue 01-Oct-13 18:02:09

Perhaps he could use a laptop? I am considering this for my DS but I guess if you do that the writing will never improve. it is a tricky one.

TheArticFunky Tue 01-Oct-13 17:47:34

Ds finds writing difficult. His writing isn't particularly scruffy it's actually quite neat but it requires huge effort and he is incredibly slow. His reading is above average for his age (level 4 at the end of year 4).

It's been a problem since quite early on and I was hoping it would improve with maturity but it isn't improving and I'm concerned that he won't keep up when he moves up to secondary school.

aciddrops Tue 01-Oct-13 16:52:19

Is it just writing that your DS has a problem with or is it reading as well? Have you considered dyslexia or Irlens Meares? The writing problem could be part of a bigger issue. My DS has a huge problem with writing but he is dyslexic and has Irlens Meares. Another of my DS's writing was terrible. He is also dyslexic but he can manage now - the writing is just scruffy. However, the other DS finds writing so difficult that he has a melt down every time he has to do writing homework. It is a complete nightmare and is a very significant problem for him. The school do not understand at all and I am in the process of speaking to them about his problems.

You can also raise the issue with your GP who can refer you to a paediatric OT. they can assess for dysgraphia/dyspraxia and advise on relevant exercises and activities to help.

bundaberg Tue 01-Oct-13 16:28:15

no experience but having read it I am wondering if ds1 has it!! so will watch this with interest

aciddrops Tue 01-Oct-13 16:22:28

Will they know what dysgraphia is? IME you are better off bypassing the school and seeking your own help.

ameliasmama89 Sat 28-Sep-13 23:12:23

Be firm with them, don't get pushed aside. You need answers to help your child to development. Remember, your the parent. Parent knows best smile x

TheArticFunky Sat 28-Sep-13 22:18:39

Thank you Ameliasmama. We have parents evening coming up, I will ask for an appointment with the SENCO.

ameliasmama89 Sat 28-Sep-13 20:39:26

Hi there, you need to get in touch with the schools SENCO (special educational need co-coordinator) High light all the things you want clarifying, and they should look into it. If you get no where with the school, go to your local council they will have a children's and family unit that will be able to point you in the right direction.x

TheArticFunky Fri 27-Sep-13 16:26:06

Bump

TheArticFunky Fri 27-Sep-13 11:57:56

I think ds ( 9) may have dysgraphia he is a bright boy ahead in reading and Maths but has always struggled with writing. He has received extra help at school however it has got to the point where I think we need him tested as I'm worried he will struggle at secondary school.

I've tried googling for further information on testing but I've drawn a blank. Does anyone have experience in this field?

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