Triple science, DD has been offered it, but doesn't want to take it.

(26 Posts)
MyballsareSandy Sun 28-Jun-15 08:51:29

DD did well in her end of year tests (year 9) and has been offered triple science. Only the kids who get a level B1 and above are offered it.

She is adamant she isn't interested in science enough to bother doing the triple. Can someone explain it all to me please. Am I right in thinking that double science will result in just one GCSE and the triple is a potential three?

DD wants to be a primary school teacher so science isn't essential to her chosen career but I think she should at least try the triple as she then has a chance to drop back to double if the workload is too much. So nothing to lose.

She did not revise much at all for these tests and got an A so she must be very capable in the subject so seems silly not to do it.

JinglyJanglyJungleBigGameTours Sun 28-Jun-15 09:05:04

Its been a long time ago now but I did Single Science to get one science GCSE. Double gave you two and triple gave you three.

I had to do single science if I wanted to do more language GCSE's due to timetabling.

GinUpGirl Sun 28-Jun-15 09:07:54

Double science gives you two GCSEs - Science and Additional Science, that both include a mix of physics, biology and chemistry.

Triple science gives you a GCSE in each of the subjects.

Double is absolutely fine should she not want to pursue science. Hell, double science is fine full stop tbh - my DB is midway through a medicine degree having 'only' studied double science at GCSE.

TheFallenMadonna Sun 28-Jun-15 09:15:06

Double Science is two GCSEs, Science (usually called Core Science) and Additional Science (unless the school does IGCSE). Science and Additional Science covers 2/3 of the content of triple Science (more correctly separate Biology, Chemitry, Physics). Both separate sciences and Additional Science are the progression route to A level Sciences.

Some schools give that extra third of content extra time, so triple science takes up an option block. Some do not. Some schools make it optional, some do not. If your dd's school do not, there are two significant things for her to consider: would she benefit from the extra teaching time available for Core and Additional, and would not being in one of the top sets affect her motivation?

I would ask to meet the Head of Science to discuss. The pros and cons can be very individual. It isn't as simple as "triple science is better" or she doesn't need triple science for what she wants to do.

ValancyJane Sun 28-Jun-15 13:45:44

As a Science teacher, quite honestly I'd recommend not forcing her to do it - double Science is time consuming enough (usually six lessons a week minimum - so over the week they spend more than 1/5 of it in Science - depends on the school/timetabling though), triple Science usually takes up an option block and therefore means even more time in Science. Unless a student is really keen on Science it can be a bit of a slog, and I've known some students to choose triple and then regret their choice not realising the commitment. Also, it's not usually that easy to 'drop' to double Science. If she has another subject in mind, I think she should go with that.

I don't mean to be negative, Science is a great subject (I'm obviously biased!) and triple science is fantastic for those really into the subject... Just it can be hard work for someone who isn't that keen!

annandale Sun 28-Jun-15 13:48:14

I'm quite depressed at a primary school teacher who doesn't want to maximise her achievement in science. Primary school teaching is competitive and having good science qualifications will increase her chance of getting a job and being a better teacher.

TheBreeze Sun 28-Jun-15 13:55:25

DS did Double, he had the option of Triple, he was also very capable but wanted to do two language GCSE's and timetabling wouldn't allow it. He then went on to do a Physics degree, so it didn't hold him back.

SanityClause Sun 28-Jun-15 14:05:10

The way it works is there are three modules of each science. If you do core science, you do one of each, double science, two of each, and triple science, three of each.

So, triple science is not harder, it's just more science.

Most schools allow you to study a science at A level, provided you attain the appropriate grades in the modules you take. So, if you want to do A level physics, you might have to get an A in the two physics modules, for example.

Rummikub Sun 28-Jun-15 14:09:08

If you're in England then one of the requirements for a primary teaching degree is a science GCSE. This doesn't have to be triple science.

GinandJag Sun 28-Jun-15 14:12:28

You need to know how exactly the school delivers science.

Science + Additional Science is absolutely fine for any career, including science ones. Physics + Chemistry + Biology, or Science + Additional + Extension, adds in some factoids rather than huge amounts of insight and understanding.

What you need to know about the school is whether triple science uses up more curriculum time, so takes up an option block at the expense of another subject.

Also, is setting based on whether you do triple, double or single? That means, does the top set do triple, middle set double and bottom set single. Reading between the lines, are all the clever kids doing triple? Would your DD encounter more disruption if not doing triple? If she does double, will there still be a top set for her?

chickenfuckingpox Sun 28-Jun-15 14:13:43

you get three gcses instead of two my daughter does this to fit it in she has to give up most of her PE and have an extra class after school

GinUpGirl Sun 28-Jun-15 14:14:14

I'm quite depressed at a primary school teacher who doesn't want to maximise her achievement in science.

At the expense of all the other subjects she could be learning about, to... you know... give children a good, all-round, primary education.

Science teacher yes, but why fill up a timetable slot with more of the same when she could be enriching herself with French, for example?

lljkk Sun 28-Jun-15 14:17:54

My take on it is...
if taking triple science prevents her from taking an option she'd love & excel at, then it's wrong thing to do.

However, strategically it would probably keep more options open about future careers to take triple science now, all other things being equal.

annandale Sun 28-Jun-15 14:22:58

I guess there's always an opportunity cost with every choice, and it's true that it would be relevant to know what else she wants to do instead.

TheFallenMadonna Sun 28-Jun-15 15:30:25

Depending on how the course is delivered, doing 2 rather than 3 GCSEs in Science can be the way to maximise achievement in Science. Every year we come up against the "triple science is better" thing. It is nothing like as simple as that. There are loads of variables that need to be taken into consideration, and they will depend on the student and the school.

westoxmum Sun 28-Jun-15 15:32:11

"DD wants to be a primary school teacher so science isn't essential to her chosen career" !!!! I can't get past that and am just as depressed as annandale.

TheFallenMadonna Sun 28-Jun-15 15:33:05

You can progress to Science A levels (and this careers in Science) from Additional Science. What you need is the high grade.

TheFallenMadonna Sun 28-Jun-15 15:36:32

I am as anxious as anyone else that primary school teachers have good science understanding. However, three rather than two science GCSEs would have a negligible impact on that, and to suggest otherwise shows a lack of understanding of Science GCSEs.

ifonly4 Sun 28-Jun-15 19:58:10

My DD is in Year 9 and doing triple science, she's not sure about it though. She can swap at the start of Year 10 and do double science but will have to make up the coursework already started by those doing double. It's so hard to know what's the best thing to do.

I half think she should cut her losses now and ask to be transferred to double, giving her a better opportunity to achieve the two A*s (or whatever the new grade is) she set her sights on in a couple of subjects.

clary Sun 28-Jun-15 21:12:34

Actually science is essential to her chosen career - you can't train as a primary teacher without science GCSE.

That said, double will be fine.

I would be like you tho, encourage her to do the triple, it has to be a good idea if you are capable of it. YY tho, how do theyr do it? Anextra lesson after school (my DC's school)? or an option block (lots of other schools)? If the latter, will it stop her doing something else she wants to do?

GinUpGirl Sun 28-Jun-15 21:15:23

Completely agree TheFallenMadonna.

Having 2 science GCSEs rather than 3 will have no impact on DD's understanding/enthusiasm for science. The teaching at the school, and her own ability will though.

ErrolTheDragon Mon 29-Jun-15 01:10:54

Not sure my DD ( who's just done her GCSEs ) would agree with that. She commented while revising that she felt a bit sorry for people who didn't do triple because u1&2 tended to be 'about science' ( some of it quite boring) whereas 3 was more properly understanding it and therefore a lot more interesting.

But that argument might well be lost on someone doing triple reluctantly. You can lead a horse to water...

BigBoobiedBertha Mon 29-Jun-15 01:24:51

I would suggest you find about about the hours involved as schools seem to vary judging by the responses. Sounds like some schools use an option slot for the third science which they don't here. In DS1's school you get the same time to triple science as you do for double, you just have to work harder to fit it in. Presumably this why the only the top set do it. It isn't negotiable either, it is just the way it is. They do start the course in the last term of yr 9 to fit it in though.

DS is doing the higher level paper in double science (well hopefully he will for additional science - we have to wait and see how he does in core higher paper) and the 6th form college say he can do science A levels so long as he gets a B or above in double science.

Personally, I think science is important but getting a good GCSE grade in additional science must be as good, if not better, than getting mediocre grades in triple science surely?

BigBoobiedBertha Mon 29-Jun-15 01:24:57

I would suggest you find about about the hours involved as schools seem to vary judging by the responses. Sounds like some schools use an option slot for the third science which they don't here. In DS1's school you get the same time to triple science as you do for double, you just have to work harder to fit it in. Presumably this why the only the top set do it. It isn't negotiable either, it is just the way it is. They do start the course in the last term of yr 9 to fit it in though.

DS is doing the higher level paper in double science (well hopefully he will for additional science - we have to wait and see how he does in core higher paper) and the 6th form college say he can do science A levels so long as he gets a B or above in double science.

Personally, I think science is important but getting a good GCSE grade in additional science must be as good, if not better, than getting mediocre grades in triple science surely?

proudmama2772 Tue 30-Jun-15 14:52:46

My DD is in the same situation where she was offered triple and we completely supported her in dropping it and going for double.

GCSEs are stressful enough and if she ever changed her mind and wanted to go into Physics we would support her later on even though its unlikely.

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