I think I might have inadvertently done DS1's last Geography assessment

(12 Posts)
rwepi Mon 11-Nov-13 20:34:53

He had to advise the Kenyan government on the best site for a new hotel - there were various headings that he had to include in a report.

He made his initial effort which TBH was a bit slapdash and rushed. I told him I thought he could do better and made him expand all his points. Basically by saying "which means that" or "which could be solved by" and making him add an explanation.

I still wasn't that pleased with him it when he handed it in, but I'd lost the will to live. My reason for trying to support him with it was to try an instil a habit of looking for ways to improve his work rather than handing in the minimum he thought he could get away with. I didn't realise it was a proper marked assessment.

His level for Geography has gone up a whole level since the end of last term blush It's not going to look good next term is it?

RandomMess Mon 11-Nov-13 20:36:15

I wouldn't worry too much, you didn't give him the answers!

DalmationDots Mon 11-Nov-13 20:49:34

Haha, never mind! No harm done. You didn't do his assessment, just made constructive suggestions for improvement ;)

admission Mon 11-Nov-13 21:16:29

And he could take on board what you said for all future work. Mine you he is a teenage boy!!!

Seeline Tue 12-Nov-13 09:58:43

Kids have to learn teh techniques necessary for completing such work - it's not just being able to find the facts on google as I keep telling my DS. If hte school aren't going to do it, tehn what is wrong with advising your DCs on different methods and approaches? You didn't do the work - you just asked probing questions to which your DS responded. Hopefully he will be better able to deal with a similar assignmet in the future. Surely this is what is meant by parental support?

HaveAcuppa Tue 12-Nov-13 13:58:40

What I hate about homework is a child completes their homework to the best of their ability and is happy with what they have produced, it gets marked but then school do not advise on how it could have reached the next level or give examples of how to make it better.
I am always supporting homework (not doing it for them, but giving advise on techniques to make it better)

Shows he can do it though rwepi!

Haveacuppa - do your school not have something like an EBI (even better if) comment at the end of each marked piece?

treas Thu 14-Nov-13 10:04:34

What you gave was guidance not answers, just as a book editor would do to an author, although in that case it would usually be advice to add in a gratuitous sex scenegrin

amidaiwish Thu 14-Nov-13 10:06:07

you didn't do it for him. you pushed him to improve it. what is wrong with that?

Middleagedmotheroftwo Thu 14-Nov-13 10:07:50

DH and I used to compete for the best grade when "helping" the DDs with their homework. He was gutted when I got a B+ for my her project on the Nile blush

Philoslothy Thu 14-Nov-13 19:13:51

Add message | Report | Message poster HaveAcuppa Tue 12-Nov-13 13:58:40
What I hate about homework is a child completes their homework to the best of their ability and is happy with what they have produced, it gets marked but then school do not advise on how it could have reached the next level or give examples of how to make it better.

Every time I mark a piece of work I make a suggestion of how it could be improved, that is standard. Every time I mark a leveled or graded piece I set the students a task that should enable them to reach the next level or grade. Again fairly standard.

treas Thu 14-Nov-13 21:00:40

Philoslothy- Yes, what you do should be standard, however, not all teachers do this.

Ds's school does Triple Impact Marking (TIM), which works quite well. Unfortunately, his previous school wasn't so good at TIM as some of the teachers didn't look at the work after the children's peers had marked the work. Frustrating in subjects like French when children do not have the experience or knowledge that there are more than one way to write the same thing.

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