Do you buy your children the books they are studying in English?

(22 Posts)
ShadeofViolet Fri 06-Sep-13 10:58:28

DS is in year 8 and is doing Dracula this term. I asked him this morning if he needs to get a copy and he told me no.

Is this usual? When I was at school you had your own copy of the texts. I said I would get him one so he could look at it but he insisted he didn't need one.

Do you buy texts, either on your own or through the school. DS is not the worlds best listener!

Floralnomad Fri 06-Sep-13 11:02:39

I do but that's because my son used to write notes on the pages ,which you obviously can't do with a book you have to give back . If you're not going to write in it though I don't think its essential and might be better to buy the 'notes' on the book instead .

longingforsomesleep Fri 06-Sep-13 11:22:38

School have always provided copies of texts. At GCSE level I've tended to buy copies so, as Floral says, notes can be made in the margins. I've never bothered pre-GCSE though.

RussiansOnTheSpree Fri 06-Sep-13 11:34:10

If we didn't have the book already then yes, I'd buy own copies for my kids. Thus far we've had the books anyway.

mumslife Fri 06-Sep-13 11:57:57

i do so they can write in it notes etc well for gcse and a levels anyway daughtet doing picture of dorian gray for a levels got that also strret car named desire am bucking slightly as 10 pound in wh smith will have to look on amazon

HmmmIwonder Fri 06-Sep-13 13:27:35

All the books she's read, or should that be 'read' (i.e. skimmed through in class) we already have on our bookshelves at home. She won't touch them. Never reads! Over the years I've learned to accept this as a fact of her life and personality. She's an A* English student confused.

Madmog Fri 06-Sep-13 14:18:11

My daughter has just gone into Year 8. So far, if they are studying a book in class they are each given a copy but it remains in school. They have been required to do written work based on the book at home but nothing major so doesn't warrant buying one. They usually have to read another similar style book at home, but it's up to them whether they buy it or borrow from school library (who so far have been brilliant finding my daughter a suitable book).

Jas Fri 06-Sep-13 14:23:37

I am buying them for the first time this year for GCSE studies. I have never bought (or needed to have) other books specifically for school studies.

alemci Fri 06-Sep-13 14:41:28

yes for GCSE. I have passed the copies onto my other dc despite it being written on.

friday16 Fri 06-Sep-13 15:48:55

Books are great, right? Why wouldn't you buy them? Read them yourself, perhaps?

ShadeofViolet Fri 06-Sep-13 16:30:41

Books are great, right? Why wouldn't you buy them? Read them yourself, perhaps?

I read Dracula but I am not that crazy about reading it again. I also don't want to spend money if I don't really need to.

My dd is in year 10 and is given a copy of the book she is studying. They can write notes in as they get to keep it.

Iamnotminterested Sat 07-Sep-13 12:50:08

DD has just started year 8 and her English group have started to read "Al Capone ironed my shirts" (?), something like that anyway, and she ordered her own copy from good old Amazon last night because she is enjoying it so much. Will buy whatever books they fancy, I spend a fortune on Amazon but rather that than her asking for designer clothes!

MaddestMother Sun 08-Sep-13 23:15:32

You can get Dracula free on kindle.

StressedandFrazzled Mon 09-Sep-13 11:13:01

My DS's (Yr 8) provide the books. They are going to be reading Lord of The Flies, but if they didn't provide the book, I would definitely buy it for him.

monikar Mon 09-Sep-13 11:20:01

I bought books for GCSE so that DD could highlight and make notes in her own copy. They need a 'clean' copy for the exam and this was the school copy.

A word of advice when you are buying a duplicate copy - make sure it is the same edition and publisher as the school copy. I made this mistake myself before I got DD to show me the cover of the book I was ordering off Amazon. She got to remember where quotations were on the pages so it was essential that the school book was an exact copy. I also discovered with Amazon that it was never worth paying for postage. Postage can really increase the cost of a paperback, and I had been paying for ages when I ordered a book I was in no hurry for and selected 'free super saver delivery' - it literally takes about 2/3 days if the book is in stock, and has saved me loads.

alemci Mon 09-Sep-13 11:23:02

also you can link amazon to the lifeboat appeal when you buy things from there and I think it is a really good way to support this charity.

NoComet Mon 09-Sep-13 11:25:13

I have bought mice and men, Teacher asked if they could as she doesn't want the class set scribbled in.

DD asked for a specific CGP copy of Romeo & Juliet with colourful notes, she's dyslexic - her own notes are 'intresting'

friday16 Mon 09-Sep-13 11:28:44

"A word of advice when you are buying a duplicate copy - make sure it is the same edition and publisher as the school copy."

A relative believes that all editions of Shakespeare's plays are the same, "because it's out of copyright". Ho hum.

englishteacher78 Wed 11-Sep-13 07:07:10

It is indeed the case that 'clean copies' are needed for exams so it can be helpful to get a copy for annotation purposes.
I suspect, however, that if they are doing Dracula in Year 8 they will only be doing extracts - I would consider some of that text inappropriate for a year 8 class. The full length text would fill at least a whole term with that age group.

prettybird Fri 13-Sep-13 01:11:01

Ds is in S2 (=Y8) and is currently reading "Kidnapped". The school has given him what looks like a brand new book. He is complaining bitterly about the size of the text. Dh suggested that we maybe buy him a different copy with larger/more spaced out text.

I said No grin

he's got to get used to reading small text and should be reading more anyway

Dominodonkey Fri 13-Sep-13 18:07:47

I have never heard of key stage 3 students having to buy books to study but most gcse and all A level students do.

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