SQA results support thread

(85 Posts)

Anyone else's DC waiting for results on 6 Aug? I've one doing Advanced Highers (but already has unconditional place) and one doing Highers, who hasn't applied, but may apply through clearing if the results are good enough.

Neither has signed up for email/text results, so they'll be waiting until 3pm for the postie!

Dameron Thu 08-Aug-13 00:48:33

My daughter did the same. Unconditional so she slacked off. I think she got a bit of a fright though this year although she did manage to pass them. Got an A in her Adv Higher but 3 'C's in the Crash Highers. I should have expected it though - I did exactly the same thing all those years ago. Perhaps not a waste of a year - she was only 16 at the end of 5th Year - but I do feel frustrated.

Dameron Thu 08-Aug-13 00:52:39

I'm sure she will. I did! Son did the same and he's going into his 4th year now and doing well. Will graduate next year. Daughter will work I'm sure even though she slacked off this year (see post). I wouldn't panic.

mrsjay Thu 08-Aug-13 09:54:22

IT is frustrating Dameron I was raging (inwardly) at dd1 results although she got an A in her advanced higher but failed the rest one was a no mention, It doesn't matter now I suppose she is in herlast year of her degree but at the time it was annoying, she was 18 and probably shouldve left in 5th year

mrsjay Thu 08-Aug-13 09:56:25

Please will someone tell me that their dc messed up advanced highers but still managed to remember how to work when they got to uni.

as I just said she is doing great her degree is a music production/engineering one though so a lot of practical stuff but she has just passed her second year

wigglybeezer Thu 08-Aug-13 10:13:27

I still feel a bit guilty about my one Advanced higher at C in sixth year, although I did do my Art school portfolio, which was a lot of work.

Does anyone ever post on these threads if their child does really badly? I am anticipating disaster next year for DS1, he is in the guinea pig year for the new exams and seems oblivious to the purpose and point of education at the moment. After much angst I am almost at the point of letting him fail as I feel he will only try hard when he feels he is choosing to work for himself.

I am trying not to mind posts on facebook congratulating the clever children of my friends.

After DS1 I have DS2 with Aspergers to worry about!

wigglybeezer Thu 08-Aug-13 10:14:30

Forgot to say well done to all the exam passers ( and their parents).

mrsjay Thu 08-Aug-13 10:21:19

he will be fine wiggly although the new C O E seems pretty laid back for what i hear of it but im sure he will get into the swing of it when he goes into 4th year, and next year I have the Highers to worry about with dd2 those are one year courses so not sure she will do well,

JellicleCat Thu 08-Aug-13 16:50:48

I found bribery worked with standard grades wiggly. blush Much as I don't like paying for results, it worked. We paid dd so much for each A (bright but idle so no point in paying for passes). Would it work for littlewiggle?
obviously should have done the same for advanced highers

And thanks to those reassuring me about passing exams at uni.

mrsjay Thu 08-Aug-13 18:52:41

nowt wrong with a weebit of incentive imo

2rebecca Thu 08-Aug-13 23:33:10

I've never given financial incentives. By the time they have external exams they should be realising that they are sitting their exams for themselves and their future, not to make me happy.
I have encouraged them to think about future careers and look at exam grades needed for college as I think once kids start having a plan for life then the rest follows. My son's friends are quite academic which helps.
My stepson did badly in his highers. he cruised standard grades so thought he could do no work for highers, failed most, got a couple in 6th year, got into a local college for a degree, got kicked out in his first term for slacking and so worked for a couple of years.
He's now doing a degree in an unrelated subject and doing really well and is motivated. He just needed a few years to mature and decide what he wanted to do. Parental nagging at 17 was a waste of effort.

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