Teacher speak interpretation needed please [grin]

(30 Posts)
seeker Sun 31-Mar-13 09:06:23

After years of school reports, I have learned what "lively" "eager to contribute" and "full of life" mean!

But ds has 5 "reward" certificates this term, 3 of which use "determined"

Ideas? Bloody minded? Never gives up, even when clearly in the wrong?

DearPrudence Sun 31-Mar-13 09:13:05

Stubborn?

LadyBarlow Sun 31-Mar-13 09:20:47

'Sticks at the activity even when I'm trying to get the whole class back together. It drives me insane but I do like his enthusiasm!' grin

Cybbo Sun 31-Mar-13 09:37:58

Schools are trying to encourage perseverance so maybe they mean that for determined

I think determined is good. He is not a quitter. smile I know what you mean about there possibly being another explanation though. grin I would be doing the same!

seeker Sun 31-Mar-13 09:56:11

I have always loved searching my children's reports for this year's way of saying "mini seeker is doing very well, but would do much better if he/she would shut up and listen for the occasional 5 minutes"!

Oh yes. I think we have had 'spirited' once or twice with DS2 and we all know what that means. sad

tiggytape Sun 31-Mar-13 14:42:41

We had 'mischievous' on DD's report last year. That's worse than lively! In fact it is not even properly disguised teacher speak for naughty! They did also say she was delightful and full of fun too (presumably when she isn't being a royal PIA)

DS only ever gets 'quiet' and 'a pleasure to teach' which means he is so silent he is all but invisible and this is a welcome attribute as far as the stressed out teacher is concerned. He has had this on every report for 9 years now!

Determined is good though - perseverance is a good trait.

Schooldidi Sun 31-Mar-13 14:49:27

I only ever use determined in a good way. I use it to talk about the kids who refuse to give up even though the rest of the class could have lost interest ages before.

It would never even occur to me to look for a translation of determined, it is what it is, which is good.

Which seemingly innocuous words are not good on a report School?

Schooldidi Sun 31-Mar-13 15:23:08

I'm not actually sure. I tell it as it is, so if they aren't behaving the way they are supposed to then I would let you know, politely but clearly.

I do know that some of my colleagues use teacher speak though, so there obviously are some words that mean pita but aren't clear to the parents.

Wouldn't it be refreshing to say 'X is a right pain in the arse' School? grin

These make me laugh. Our (Y8) parents' evening included these gems:

"I enjoy his wit but he needs to learn that there are times to rein it in" [English].

"He can be very entertaining and I enjoy his sense of humour, but at the end of the day, it's a Science practical, not the stand-up comedy circuit".

Your DS sounds a hoot Three. Full of personality. grin

Just to clarify, we did take the clowning quite seriously, and stern words were had.

smile We told him that he can let his 'personality' have free rein once he has some A-levels under his belt.

As the Mum of a shy, quiet DS of 13 Three, it sounds odd but I would be overjoyed to read that in his report. blush

I think they must mean 'determined' in the positive, perseverance sense, or they wouldn't be giving out reward certificates for it.

LynetteScavo Sun 31-Mar-13 15:47:34

"Determined" means determined in a good way.

"Willful" means determined in a bad way.

seeker Sun 31-Mar-13 15:49:44

Shame. Much more fun if it was teacher speak!

Schooldidi Sun 31-Mar-13 15:52:23

I'd love to be able to say that Sparkling. Our "house style" is generally against being rude about children though, however accurate it might be.

Three your ds sounds like the sort of pupil I enjoy teaching, as long as he does learn when to stop the comedy.

Parents should have a choice of how they want the reports worded School. Those that can take the truth can have it told like it is. grin

EvilTwins Sun 31-Mar-13 19:25:16

I was told by one of my yr 11s that her report was a bit "gushy". She questioned whether I had new at the red wine... blush

EvilTwins Sun 31-Mar-13 19:25:35

been at the red wine.

Schmedz Sun 31-Mar-13 21:16:44

Anything preceded by the word 'can' ( as in 'X can listen well to instructions...) usually means it doesn't usually happen but has maybe on one occasion!

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now