How Dangerous is lead paint?

(12 Posts)
BlueBee Sat 13-Jun-15 16:51:42

Hi,
I'm debating on stripping the landing bannister, it's thick with old gloss paint, it's an old house so I suspect it may have lead paint somewhere in it.

I was going to use some of that corrosive stuff and a heat gun, with a mask.

I'm also 7 months pregnant - if that makes any difference.

Is that safe do you think?

PigletJohn Sat 13-Jun-15 16:59:33

the dust from sanding, and the fumes from burning, are considered hazardous to the development of the brain in children, so I wouldn't.

If you can find a paint stripper that works (they have been reformulated recently to be safer and ineffective) that would be OK.

Is the house more than 50 years old?

BlueBee Sat 13-Jun-15 19:39:52

Yes it was built in 1914. I don't think the bannister is the original but it does look old and is caked in gloss. I was going to replace the spindles though as they will be a faff.

Does that paint stripper stuff work without a heat gun ?

deckthehallswithdesperation Sat 13-Jun-15 19:42:17

I did stained glass & there's lots of lead fumes around, they recommend wearing a good quality cycling mask as a filter but if you're preggers I'd avoid it altogether for now.

Ragusa Sat 13-Jun-15 22:55:57

Cycling mask will not cut it. Quite aside from breathing in the fumes there is a risk of lead paint dust/ chips getting onto your face, in your hair, on your clothes etc, and it then getting ingested by accident. Unborn children are at particularly high risk of brain and nerve damage IIRC. Besides which, residues can linger, and soon you'll have a baby who puts everything into their mouth
.
You could try a professional decorator who is fully aware of the dangers of lead?

BlueBee Sat 13-Jun-15 23:01:49

Hmmmmm, yeah looks like I may have to leave this to the professionals then. It just annoys me every time I look at it!

Thanks for the advice.

Chicksy Sun 14-Jun-15 22:13:55

Please don't do it yourself. My husband plastered in a house weeks after old paint was removed. Lead was in the dust in the house and he ended up with lead poisoning.

Muddymits Sun 14-Jun-15 22:16:24

God no way, actually be wary of professionals too as so many aren't at all professional in this area.

You can use any wet strip method, wet all the way keeps it safe but use gloves/mask too..

PigletJohn Sun 14-Jun-15 22:23:17

Slightly off-topic, but the graphs of brain damage by lead are stunning

Mail sorry

Grauniad

Opinions differ.

PigletJohn Sun 14-Jun-15 23:41:14

or the story the papers have used came from the BBC

ichef.bbci.co.uk/news/624/media/images/74298000/gif/_74298891_lead_crime_gra624.gif

shovetheholly Mon 15-Jun-15 09:12:56

You can buy the effective and older form of paint stripper on ebay. It is extremely, extremely nasty stuff, though. All of the advice says not even to think about doing it when pregnant or when young children are in the house. Sorry! I think you're going to have to get someone else to do it while you're on holiday in future! (Or simply replace the bannister with a new one if you can't wait).

BlueBee Mon 15-Jun-15 18:45:09

Crikey. Ok now I am thinking yes just replace the whole thing, just to be on the safe side then. I'll look into that instead then. Thanks.

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