House and garden on separate titles - problem??

(7 Posts)
runningLou Sun 20-Jul-14 19:19:34

We've just had plans through from solicitor with other paperwork for house we're buying. Solicitor flagged up that for some reason the house and half the garden are on one title, and the bottom half of the garden is on another. The owner has rights to both - though property is leasehold (999 year lease) with nominal ground rent of £1 pcm.
Is this a problem?? Can we apply to land registry to get these titles combined?
Also is it worth purchasing freehold - am thinking it might make property easier to sell on?

spotty26 Sun 20-Jul-14 19:29:33

Two separate title is no problem as long as there is no ransom strip between them and they abut one another.

Missellie6 Sun 20-Jul-14 20:18:52

Our current house is leasehold with 911 years left on it. Our solicitor advised us not to buy freehold as the legal fees etc were more than we would pay in ground rent over 25 years. If it is fairly common for the area I don't think it makes any difference to resale value.

Suzietwo Sun 20-Jul-14 21:49:53

Check it isn't agricultural land

Chillisauce Sun 20-Jul-14 23:10:00

I've just had the same thing from our solicitor. Freehold house but leasehold garden. She said it's ok but I'd never heard of it!

LandRegRep1862 Mon 21-Jul-14 12:19:35

Two titles is generally fine and not that unusual.
They could only be combined (amalgamated) if they were the same class/tenure of title and held in the same ownership/capacity.
I suspect, as part of the garden is registered separately that whilst probably in the same ownership the class/tenure of title is different? The class of title for example Absolute/Possessory is referred to in the B Proprietorship register.

SarcyMare Mon 21-Jul-14 12:38:43

or it could just be they were bought at different times like our house, the owners wanted the drive somewhere different so arranged to buy an extra strip of land off the neighbours.
so our house is on two deeds one for the house and one for the drive.

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