conservatory heating?

(43 Posts)
whatatwat Wed 14-Nov-12 09:58:38

if you have one, what heating do you have?

Jojay Wed 14-Nov-12 22:40:25

We have an electric plug in heater from Argos which is fab, but we've had the ceiling insulated by Roof Revive

It's fantastic, does everything they said it would and I'd recommend it to anyone smile

CanYouHearMe Wed 14-Nov-12 23:22:32

Ours joins onto the living area with no door. And it's got a rad. I am highly illegal!

CanYouHearMe Wed 14-Nov-12 23:37:03

Jojay, thanks for the link, that looks fantastic. Dare I ask how much it has cost? We have an Edwardian style conservatory which is about 10 x 9. I'd love to do that to ours.

RumBaaBaa Thu 15-Nov-12 11:02:25

Our conservatory was north west facing and was still like a fecking oven in the summer and positively Arctic in winter. It was a good solid brick built conservatory with triple glazing, cavity insulation, underfloor heating and those colonial style blinds.

I would never have one again. It was a rented house so we couldn't do anything about it. I just don't see the point of having a room that you can only use for part of the year. We used ours as a family room/playroom and the kids were barely ever in there.

And, unless we closed it off entirely with doors and curtains) it seeped warmth from the adjoining rooms in winter, causing the rest of the downstairs to be arctic too, and drew in so much heat in summer that the whole house took on oven like characteristics.

If you are part way through building, I cannot advise you strongly enough to get a proper roof put on the damn thing. You won't regret it, honestly.

<fully paid up member of the conservatory-haters society>

It's great for drying clothes in. Especially given the health risk posed by wet laundry indoors
m.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-20176376
We have double glazed doors separating the rest of the house from the conservatory. We also have a electric convection heater when we feel like burning ££ (rarely). However the electric heater does make it warm enough to use in winter.

We inherited our conservatory when we bought the house. I have since joined the conservatory hater group too. And ours have one of those fancy pilkington glass roof. Looks really fab though I have to say.

wendybird77 Thu 15-Nov-12 11:42:29

Oh that is disappointing that the pilkington glass roof doesn't help much. We have just inherited ours with the house and I'm trying to figure out how to make it properly comfortable as there are 3 (!) sets of doors leading on to it - it runs across the entire back of the house. I'm thinking a roof revive type solution. The cost frightens me though! As to not having radiators, I believe that you can have them as long as they are controlled apart from the rest of the heating system - and from what I've read thermostatic valves are ok for this. Easy enough to take the rads out if you need to sell the house and it is an issue though.

Radiator - although we tend not to use the room as much in the winter, so the double doors (which lead into the dining room) are usually closed. When you go in there it's noticeably colder than the rest of the house, but with the doors open it soon warms up.

PS have thought about replacing the roof with a solid one but I like the fact that it feels like an outdoor room with a glass roof. But we must lose shed-loads of heat through it confused.

Jojay Thu 15-Nov-12 12:45:26

Canyouhearme It cost us around £2.5k for Roof Revive to do our ceiling. Not cheap, but cheaper than knocking it down and building a new extension, which was the other option!

This company were cheaper, quoted us around £1400 iirc, but we went with Roof Revive in the end. Our conservatory is about 4mx3m. It now feels like an extension with lots of windows, and very much part of the house. We removed the doors between the two rooms and it works brilliantly for us.

halfnhalf Thu 15-Nov-12 16:04:15

I love our conservatory and never heat it (for reasons given above) and it DOES make the rest of the house much colder. It opens straight out from the kitchen with no doors. But I wouldn't be without it, it's so nice for most of the year.

RumBaaBaa Thu 15-Nov-12 16:14:43

You can still get that outdoor room feel if you go for a solid roof with veluxes.

Our back room in our new house is a bit like that - solid walls at either side, with a long wall of glass windows and doors all the way along the back. Roof has a shallow pitch, is about a foot thick with a slate roof (to match the style of the rest of the house - thick stone walls, slate tiles), with three large veluxes. It feels very outdoor-ish and lets in loads of light, sky and sea view all year round but doesn't fluctuate in temperature.

CanYouHearMe Sat 17-Nov-12 22:10:05

Thanks Jojay. Must check my lotto numbers!

LovingTheSunshine Thu 06-Dec-12 21:22:20

We're going with Roof Revive soon - will report back smile

LovingTheSunshine Mon 17-Dec-12 23:03:31

Hi all, just wanted to say we've had the roof finished by roof revive & we are very happy smile The conservatory looks fantastic, minimal light lost & it is WARM in there. Just the decorating to do now!

wendybird77 Mon 17-Dec-12 23:06:36

Thanks for reporting back. Is your conservatory UPVC or wood? I'm concerned that the plaster may crack terribly in ours which is UPVC due to the movement with wind and weather!

Startail Mon 17-Dec-12 23:20:02

Underfoot, but it takes forever to heat up the room.

Need a heater to let it be used just after school.

LovingTheSunshine Mon 17-Dec-12 23:26:38

It's UPVC. Before going with roof revive we went to look at a job that was finished 2 years ago & it still looked great with no visible cracks. Obviously it's early days for us though!

LovingTheSunshine Mon 17-Dec-12 23:28:03

Anyone want to see pics just get in touch smile

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