what do you write in the reading book of a reception child that doesnt read?

(40 Posts)
unsureunderneath Tue 11-Sep-12 18:07:48

Dd1 started today and has brought home a reading book which uses high frequency words.

She cannot read yet so I read the book to her and then went back through it showing her the words and asking her to point the high frequency ones out on each page (is that right)

What do I write In the reading book?

Euphemia Tue 11-Sep-12 18:09:40

Write "read the book to her and then went back through it showing her the words and asking her to point the high frequency ones" smile

Ruprekt Tue 11-Sep-12 18:12:40

'we shared the book together'

LeeCoakley Tue 11-Sep-12 18:18:22

DD enjoyed the book.
We read the book together.
We discussed the story.
DD made up her own story using the pictures.
DD pointed out to me 'was' 'and 'he'.
DD pointed out 'the' on each page.

Hopefully after using up the first two you will get a new book and can start from the top again. grin

unsureunderneath Tue 11-Sep-12 18:47:11

Thanks, wasn't sure as all the suggestions were aimed at children that could read the words.

unsureunderneath Tue 11-Sep-12 18:48:16

Suggestions in the reading book I mean, not your suggestions - which were all fab obv! grin

mrz Tue 11-Sep-12 18:49:00

Why have you sent this book home? hmm

BonkeyMollocks Tue 11-Sep-12 18:50:42

i have just written 'we have read the book together' .

DS had his first book today, without words. I wrote that we looked at it together, he counted what was on each page, he found the ending funny and he liked that the people looked happy. Then DS made me do an intricate drawing of said book so his teacher is going to think I'm a right twat.

unsureunderneath Tue 11-Sep-12 19:59:42

Lol @ intricate drawing. I would love to see that!

UniS Tue 11-Sep-12 21:16:24

with one of the wordless books DS told me "the story" and i wrote it on postit notes. Stuck them into the reading diary.

Next day I quoted DS's question " How many more of these do I have to have"

two days later he had a book with words to his great delight.

PastSellByDate Wed 12-Sep-12 09:44:45

I agree with Euphemia. If you've already been given the first 100 high frequency words (possibly not yet with explanation) what you have is a list of words that quite often you just have to learn (as they aren't always decodable - like the, she, he, etc... or homonymns their/ there/ they're - so need to learn the difference). Personally - I'd start with she since you have a girl, but he and the also appear all the time. Add and and but - and you're really making inroads.

Show her the word - let her write it in the reading diary - and then let her count with you how many times she saw it in the reading. Add new words as necessary.

DD2 wanted to write in reading diary before she could read/ write because DD1 was doing this - so we had 3 options:

RATE MY BOOK: she would draw stars and happy faces.

Drawing of favourite character

Today we worked on the word 'she' (for example) and let your DC write it in the diary. Let your DD read she (point to it) every time you come across it and keep track of how many times she read it. Then help your DC write 'I read 'she' 18 times.' For whatever reason - DD2 was very keen that the high frequency word she was working on was in colour, with the rest written in pencil.

HTH

unsureunderneath Wed 12-Sep-12 10:04:12

Thanks pastmysellby date. The school is holding a reading workshop bit as of yet we haven't been given any details and I had no idea about high frequency words.

Thanks for the ideas and explanation smile

paddlinglikehell Wed 12-Sep-12 13:14:43

I do love some of the ideas, I always find it so hard to know what to write, always sticking to 'enjoyed this book' or ' lovely expression'!!!! Getting dd involved is a lovely idea.

I wonder if I can get her to write herself any new words she comes across, or unfamiliar words that she has to take time to sound out? She is in Year 3, so it isn't that often now, but will the teacher think me a prat sad mum?

PastSellByDate Wed 12-Sep-12 16:02:58

Hi Paddlinglikehell:

In Year 3 DD1 did write unfamiliar words into her reading diary - what she would do is look up their definition and write that down too. She got really into multiple meanings for words and when the word first came into English. Her favourite thing was to find Viking/ Saxon words.

HTH

noramum Wed 12-Sep-12 16:25:46

@Mrz: what is your school sending home until the child can read simple words?

We received such books from the beginning and the school pointed out that even reading TO the child and talking about the words in the book and the story is important.

Books without words were seen as "Baby-books" and "boring" by my DD.

unsureunderneath Wed 12-Sep-12 16:42:29

I wrote that we had read the book and dd had found the high frequency words.

She has a new book today with different high frequency words. I've discovered she has trouble saying a word. I honestly had never noticed it before she makes a v sound instead of a th sound. Should I write that in the book?

mrz Wed 12-Sep-12 21:23:19

We send home story books (library books) for parents to read to/talk about with their child. We use wordless books in school with children who have language problems/delay.

beanandspud Wed 12-Sep-12 21:44:52

Am I supposed to write in the reading record blushblushblush???

DS has been bringing home a simple reading book with high frequency words and some little flashcards. He is obviously 'reading' every day with his teacher and is beginning to recognise some words. We have been playing games with the flashcards and reading the story together at bedtime but I never thought to write anything in the record.

Blimey...I am already labelled 'crap mother' aren't I? I never thought I was supposed to write an update.

mrz that's really useful to know...when would/should a child with speech difficulties bring home books with words in - I'd really appreciate any info on this.

Glittertwins Thu 13-Sep-12 06:49:18

I've been writing that the books have been read. I meant by me to them though, not them actually reading the books. Looks like I need to be a bit more specific.

Badvoc Thu 13-Sep-12 06:53:43

Ds1 is older (y5)
I write the name of the book and what page he read up to.
I also note any difficulties/how easy it was.
Don't know why I bother....they dont read it!

Badvoc Thu 13-Sep-12 06:55:49

Unsure...you can help her with that.
Make a game of making the sound by putting your tongues between your teeth and saying " th"
My ds2 also struggled with this sund but can Make it now.

jaynebxl Thu 13-Sep-12 07:28:06

Lots of parents struggle with the idea of wordless books which is a shame because it is up to the parent to present them positively really, as a chance for parent and child to chat together about the story and come up with their own words. Can make a game of finding a variety of interesting words for each page. They are generally not only used for children with difficulties.

I'd apply the same to the book the OPs dc brought home.

unsureunderneath Thu 13-Sep-12 09:45:30

Thanks badvoc, I will try that with her later

RedHelenB Thu 13-Sep-12 09:50:45

I'm a te4aqcher & I o0ften just sign it to show ds has read it with me. Don't worry too much about what comments you write in there.

mrz Thu 13-Sep-12 16:42:27

ladyintheradiator I would send "reading scheme" books (with words) home for a child when they are able to independently blend the words in the book to read them, regardless of whether their speech is clear or unclear. I don't generally use wordless books for "reading" because I don't want children to develop the idea that we read pictures.
I do use wordless books for storytelling and developing language/vocabulary.

paddlinglikehell Thu 13-Sep-12 22:13:45

Bean- I didn't know to write in the book either - felt very silly, but then dds old school didn't give much information generally.

If you haven't had a child in school before, how would you know?

Thanks for that mrz.

HappyAsEyeAm Fri 14-Sep-12 07:16:36

Nice to see this thread, as DS1 gas started reception this week and he can't read yet either. We got the first in the purple (?) Oxford Learning Tree series Hide and Seek, last night.

I wrote "I read the book to Daniel twice, following with my finger word by word. We talked about the pictures. We talked about how to play hide and seek."

Very interesting and informative to see comments in reply. I have no idea how language is taught really.

Panzee Fri 14-Sep-12 07:22:05

Another one who say spurs sign it if you're not sure. We just want to know if they've read it or not.

Panzee Fri 14-Sep-12 07:22:32

Spurs? Wtaf? JUST grin

holyfishnets Fri 14-Sep-12 19:04:59

It's more about the story line. Can your child tell you the plot? She doesn't need to read to do this.

BsshBossh Fri 14-Sep-12 20:12:05

I just sign it (no comments, even though DD and I actively read the books together - identifying letter sounds and high frequency words). I figure it's obvious to the teacher how much my DD is progressing.

We have reading book in bag for the weekend, so this thread has been very interesting to me. We also have 'letter strings' never seen those before either. I would have really appreciated an 'introduction to reception parents' meeting or letter or something. I have no clue how they are teaching her to read and would love to know so I can help!

Feenie Sat 15-Sep-12 11:59:08

That link has some very dodgy advice about the use of picture clues, however.

I am casting around in the dark rather, that link was in the back of the reading book. Any other suggestions welcomed?

Feenie Sun 16-Sep-12 00:27:54

The rest of the stuff on that link was good - just ignore the picture clue stuff smile

mathanxiety Sun 16-Sep-12 01:53:31

I would write exactly what you did and what DD did/said in the note. That way the teacher can understand exactly where your DD stands wrt the material. The purpose of the exercise is for the teacher to get good quality feedback in order to better approach teaching your DD, so I wouldn't just write something rhubarby.

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now