Under what circumstances would you change primary schools?

(30 Posts)
Superness Fri 16-Sep-16 13:35:03

Is a recent exodus of teachers a reason to change schools...do they know something I don't? Are suspected weak KS1 and KS2 results a reason to change school? Is the fact that there is a probably a better school nearby a reason to change school? If your children are happy at school, in what circumstances would you move them? I would love to hear your thoughts. I have precisely two hours to make my mind up about moving schools!

Rattusn Fri 16-Sep-16 14:06:46

None of these sound like very concrete reasons.

Teachers leave for a variety of reasons, 'suspected' poor results doesn't mean anything, and 'probably a better school', what does this mean?

Is your child happy at their school? Are they making good progress?

I wouldn't put my primary school aged dc through the upheaval of moving school unless there were compelling reasons.

whogrewoutoftheterribletwos Fri 16-Sep-16 14:10:46

In our case, bullying and the school doing bugger all about it. No other reason would be compelling enough - especially not those based on ridiculous standardised tests for under 10s

whirlygirly Fri 16-Sep-16 14:13:25

I've just done it as we had a dc teacher clash and in a small school he would have had this particular teacher 4.5 yrs out of 7, the way things were structured. Pulled him out to a larger school and he's thriving already. It was also good to have a change of peer group.

It's the only time I've ever moved one, I moved around lots as a child and hated it. I definitely think it was the right decision though, even though it was a fair amount of hassle and expense - new uniform etc.

situatedknowledge Fri 16-Sep-16 14:14:48

Bullying and the school doing nothing about it because the other child was "from a very nice family who are having a difficult year". They are a nice family, and they did have a horrid year, but the bullying should still have been dealt with.

seriouslyclueless Fri 16-Sep-16 14:16:09

In would change if my child was being bullied and the school were crap.
Wouldn't compromise my child's mental health.

chunkymum1 Fri 16-Sep-16 14:16:47

Teachers could be leaving for any number of reasons so I wouldn't let this alone put me off the school. The SATs tests for the year just gone are generally agreed to have been problematic so I also wouldn't move my DC for that.

In fact, having moved schools myself several times in primary school and therefore knowing how difficult it can be to be the 'new girl' I'd only move my DC if I needed to leave the area, if they were really unhappy at school or if I felt that for some reason they were unsafe.

Superness Fri 16-Sep-16 14:38:34

It seems as though my reasons are not good enough. My kids are not being bullied and I have no concerns about their safety. The other school near me is judged to be 'outstanding' by ofsted and i think ours just scraped through a 'good'. I guess that is not a good enough reason either?

Superness Fri 16-Sep-16 14:40:26

Would child's opinion count? DS would be happy to move (year 4) but DD (yr 1) more hesitant about leaving her best friend

t4nut Fri 16-Sep-16 15:09:00

When were they judged outstanding?

Criteria have changed in recent years and a historic outstanding would be a current good.

Rattusn Fri 16-Sep-16 15:24:20

Have you actually viewed the 'outstanding' school?

I wouldn't move a child based simply on ofsted ratings, in fact I don't think them to be very important at all. The are some 'outstanding' schools locally that I would never send my child to.

DixieWishbone Fri 16-Sep-16 15:40:51

I moved my DC because the other school was a much better fit for their personalities and interests, and was much more diverse. The teachers are more eccentric and low key, the class size is smaller, the whole school is smaller.

The school they moved from was rated as a Blue Ribbon school (not in the UK here) and is generally considered to be excellent in the area. They are doing very well at the lower key school as it just works for them. I think at the larger school they would have been swamped as many of the pupils were very loud, confident and mainstream in their interests, my DDs would have just sunk into the background. At their current school they have had to step up and it has helped their confidence.

Leaving friends is a concern though. DD had several friends at the old school and I found trying to stay in contact with them was very one sided on our part and they have drifted apart, which is sad.

Goingtobeawesome Fri 16-Sep-16 15:44:14

We have moved schools twice but my kids weren't happy.

1. Bullying - head sided with bullies as SEN and one other reason.

2. Rubbish teaching and head refusing to communicate.

3. Child assaulted and head choosing to side with SEN bully.

Superness Fri 16-Sep-16 16:10:19

I have viewed the school, other children I know go there and are very happy with it and so are their parents. I think it is fair to say that the school they're at now is going through a period of change and it may take some time to drive up standards. My ds will be very disappointed not to move school as he seems to want a change. He thought the children all looked very friendly and he struggles a bit with the children in his class so I don't think leaving friends behind will be a big issue for him but it will be for dd. Its always harder to keep up friendships when you are not at the same school so this is a real concern for her but she is only yr 1.

Muskey Fri 16-Sep-16 16:16:25

I moved my dd because of bullying. The 3 dc who were involved all had parents who had close connections with the school. One dc's mother was a teacher at the school, another's mother was a school governor and the third mother worked at the school. So of course the school did nothing and even tried to blame dd. It was only when we moved dd did we realise how unhappy and isolated she was. It was the best thing we ever did.

averylongtimeago Fri 16-Sep-16 16:26:03

I moved my two when I found out my ds had been locked in a cupboard by his teacher.
I walked into school, told the DC to get in the car and then told the head they would not be returning. Took me a week to find another school where they were much happier.

30percentoff Fri 16-Sep-16 16:30:03

I would do it in your shoes. Good luck.

Superness Fri 16-Sep-16 16:53:00

and i guess that is the dilemma as if anything like locking up my child in a cupboard occurred I too would be out of there like a shot but its really a case of it currently being a higher achieving, more settled school which may meet the needs of my DS better even though he is making progress at current school.

LittleCandle Fri 16-Sep-16 16:56:36

I moved DD2 as she was about to be lumbered with the useless teacher in a job share for the second year running. The other part of the job share, who had been brilliant, was a new teacher and had to move schools. I moved DD2 to the local Catholic school, where her best friend attended, and it was the best thing I ever did. She went from a class of 33 (that was only half the year group) to a combined P6/7 of 22. She blossomed and I only wish I had done it sooner. Teachers leaving, however disappointing, would not be the sole reason for moving schools for me.

nicp123 Fri 16-Sep-16 18:30:04

I have changed DC1's school in his last year of primary school due to years of unsolved bullying + they had massive issues keeping the teaching staff more than a half-term! DC had 7 class teachers in one academic year!
Head of School focused on Maths and English mostly; therefore, the rest of subjects were poorly taught or non-existent.
Children sent to look in dust bins for Art and DT resources, no glue or hand soap or paper available, teachers arguing over bottles of paint. Shocking!... And this was a school classed as Very Good by Ofsted!
I had no doubt moving DC to an Independent school was the best decision. I felt so foolish trusting the Comprehensive's Head when he promised to parents that things will change! He was so charming and convincing!
OP my advise to anyone :Trust your child and yourself and if the school doesn't feel right please move. Good luck!

Rattusn Fri 16-Sep-16 18:45:58

On balance I wouldn't given the information you have provided, especially as your younger child is not keen. You say that both your dc are making reasonable progress, and it sounds happy too. The new school may well not turn out how you hoped, and then the upheaval will be for nothing. It's of course up to you though, and it sounds like you are quite fixed on the new school.

CaptainSnort Fri 16-Sep-16 18:55:12

I moved my DD because her old school refused to do anything to support her SN, leaving my DD an anxious, miserable wreck who was refusing to go to school and coming out hysterical most days. She ended up being referred to CAMHS aged 8 years old sad

The staff (mainly SLT) were the most disorganised, unhelpful, patronising, rude bunch of people I've ever had to deal with.

Her new school is about a billion times better.

Superness Fri 16-Sep-16 18:58:47

Thanks for all your views. I am still undecided but veering towards staying as I don't think my reasons for moving are the right ones. I think I will hang in there with the school.

DixieWishbone Fri 16-Sep-16 22:59:47

Is there a way you can find out why teachers are leaving? Can you ask one of them what is going on? It might be that they have a problem with how the LEA handles things as opposed to the head or the board of governors. Moving schools in the same LEA therefore wouldn't help much. Or it might be that it is just coincidence that a number of retirements and moves to fit in with spousal job changes have all hit at the same time.

ROSY2016 Fri 16-Sep-16 23:18:44

How could teacher lock a child in the cupboard? Where the social service gone? If parents done that's the end of the world?

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