School outings with no permission

(19 Posts)
trekkiemom Wed 22-Jun-16 22:57:47

My oldest came home with a letter last week asking if she would like to go on an outing to a nearby school with her book club to talk and hear about books they'd all been reading this year. My daughter didn't want to attend so I filled in the permission slip denying the school from taking her. When she came home from school today I found out that one of the assistant headteachers said she had to go and took her regardless.

Am I right thinking they shouldn't of taken her without contacting me first?

janethegirl2 Wed 22-Jun-16 23:04:21

I'd complain big time. You did not want her to go. Your decision (I may not agree with it) but it was your choice. I'd suggest you tell them that unless you have given them a positive decision, that they may not take your dd anywhere ever agein.

bemybebe Thu 23-Jun-16 18:26:45

Oh no, completely out of order. What is the point I filling in any paperwork if it is so blatantly ignored?

HanYOLO Thu 23-Jun-16 18:35:37

totally out of order and potentially a safeguarding issue

(though I would probably have encouraged made DD go if similar)

Feenie Thu 23-Jun-16 18:39:20

It was part of the curriculum and you should have encouraged your child to go.

user1466610292 Thu 23-Jun-16 18:40:52

Yea complain, I'm a teacher, we don't take kids anywhere without permission from parents

thisoldhouse1239 Thu 23-Jun-16 18:58:02

I am as shocked that you would not sign based on her not wanting to go. You made it clear it was part of the curriculum.
They should not have broken the rules.

lostscot Thu 23-Jun-16 21:41:44

Did you sign something when she started agreeing to local walks etc? Could come under that possibly if so....

exLtEveDallas Thu 23-Jun-16 21:53:36

1. Are you sure she handed in the permission slip?
2. Did you sign giving permission for local curriculum based trips at the start of the school year?
3. Did something happen to your DD whilst she was on the trip?
4. Why on earth would you not give permission?

KingLooieCatz Fri 24-Jun-16 09:03:32

They shouldn't have taken her but, my word, if I told DS he didn't have to do anything at school unless he wanted to...well the mind boggles. He certainly wouldn't be getting an education. Don't think it's the right message to send at all, unless there are big underlying issues that mean your DD would struggle to cope with the outing. It doesn't sound like it.

NapQueen Fri 24-Jun-16 09:06:12

I'm surprised they even asked tbh. Our school (and I assumed this was a national thing) states any local trips within a certain radius do not require individual permissions, but we signed a form at the start of the year to agree overall yes or no to local trips.

Only trips outside the radius or those within it requiring transport were requiring individual permissions.

SoupDragon Fri 24-Jun-16 09:07:04

Given you specifically filled in the permission slip denying permission, YANBU.

jamdonut Fri 24-Jun-16 20:45:36

Permission slips are a formality. School HAS to get permission.But it is expected that you will sign, unless you have some real objection for your child not to take part. You shouldn't really be saying she can't go just because she doesn't want to, unless it was clear it was voluntary! If that happened school trips etc would NEVER happen!

SoupDragon Fri 24-Jun-16 22:09:37

School HAS to get permission

And they didn't have it.

BoGrainger Sat 25-Jun-16 05:08:24

I imagine it was an oversight. A returned and signed form usually indicates permission. Not saying it's right but when the office are flicking through a wedge of forms for a response of this sort they are mainly checking signatures. If you hadn't returned the form it would have been more obvious.

cansu Sat 25-Jun-16 07:55:47

They obviously made a mistake. Complain but I would also be wondering why you would ask her if she wanted to go rather than tell her this is a great addition to normal lessons and of course she will be going. Pretty unbelievable that you would encourage her to opt out.

Patterkiller Sat 25-Jun-16 08:01:53

School should not have taken her and you have every right to complain.

However, you said she didn't have to go because she didn't want to?

Well I'm well and truly gob smacked.

I bet the school think you're a right treat. confused

NerrSnerr Sat 25-Jun-16 09:19:28

They made a mistake and you have a right to complain but I can't believe that you didn't sign it because she didn't want to go!

zippey Sat 25-Jun-16 09:23:23

Bad parenting on your part to allow your child not to go but the school shouldn't have put it as an option to parents to back out. It's like Brexit all over again!

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