I am preparing my DS for 7+. Can I ask his classroom teacher to tutor him him after school?

(79 Posts)
computer1000 Thu 17-Dec-15 19:36:00

I am preparing my DS for 7+. Can I ask his classroom teacher to tutor him him after school? she does not necessarily need to tutor for 7+ - just covering maths skills overall?

WaitingForSnow Thu 17-Dec-15 19:37:09

I would imagine the teacher wod already be busy after school with activities clubs and marking? But no harm in asking I suppose. Would
You pay?

melonribena Thu 17-Dec-15 20:09:46

If you are willing to pay then it's worth an ask.

LibrariesgaveusP0wer Thu 17-Dec-15 20:32:23

Ask. But expect to be told no and phrase it accordingly.

Smartiepants79 Thu 17-Dec-15 20:36:24

You can ask. I assume you are offering to pay the going rate.
They may well say no though especially if they work full time.

mineofuselessinformation Thu 17-Dec-15 20:53:05

I can't comment on primary schools, but I know that many secondary schools forbid their teachers from tutoring students at their school as it is seen as a conflict of interests.
Perhaps you should look for a private tutor?

Maidupmum Thu 17-Dec-15 21:10:01

I'm a primary HT and I don't allow my staff to tutor pupils from our school. Its disrespectful to their colleagues.

Grittzio Thu 17-Dec-15 21:12:50

Our primary does not allow it's teachers to private tutor.

MidniteScribbler Thu 17-Dec-15 23:47:55

Good grief no. Pay for a tutor like everyone else has to.

spanieleyes Fri 18-Dec-15 08:20:37

I could possibly fit him in from 9.30p.m to 10.30 p.m , after I have finished my afterschool clubs, meetings, marking, preparing for the next day, eating and speaking to my own children. Would that be OK?

TeenAndTween Fri 18-Dec-15 08:33:02

I'm not a teacher, but I think this would be wildly inappropriate.

multivac Fri 18-Dec-15 13:55:39

"Hi, I was wondering if I could pay you to teach my son all the things you are clearly failing to teach him and his classmates during the course of the school day, in your own time? What? Hang on, where are you going...?"

Feenie Fri 18-Dec-15 17:34:36

I would fall about laughing if any of my Y2 parents asked me this!

spanieleyes Fri 18-Dec-15 18:09:51

Clearly if you were a better teacher, he wouldn't need extra tutoring, so it's all your fault really and you should be jumping at the chance to correct your mistakesconfused

writingonthewall Fri 18-Dec-15 23:27:28

Well, my son goes to a private pre-prep where they are all preparing for the 7+ and I know that some of the teachers do paid tutoring outside of school hours. No reason why a state school teacher shouldn't do the same, unless the school forbids it. 7+ is done early in year 2 and the standard is above the point that some (not all) schools will be teaching at.

You can only ask, but I would check with the head first that it isn't forbidden at a school policy level.

Feenie Sat 19-Dec-15 00:38:21

No reason why a state school teacher shouldn't do the same, unless the school forbids it

Apart from the date's.own survey which shows that state primary school teachers work an average 60 hour week, perhaps? That would be the reason that would make me fall about laughing.

Feenie Sat 19-Dec-15 00:39:25

Dfe survey. Stupid autocorrect.

writingonthewall Sat 19-Dec-15 10:23:20

Some teachers job share. Some work part time. Some might want the extra cash.

irvine101 Sat 19-Dec-15 14:10:47

I think it's a great idea if your own teacher can tutor your child. She/he knows where is the child's weakness already.

Sounds like it's rare thing in England, but I was tutored by my own teacher in high school before entrance exam to university.(She volunteered, I didn't ask, she new my weakness and offered.)
Also my nephew was tutored by his teacher before his entrance exam for high school.
I lived in USA when I was a child, and my teacher kept me after school to catch up, since I didn't speak any English.

It's all happened voluntarily by teacher. I don't expect it from normal British teacher now, since how long hours they work, but like writingonthewall says, there may be a teacher who doesn't mind doing this for extra cash?
I've seen teacher looking for tutor work in other section of MN.

SirChenjin Sat 19-Dec-15 14:15:25

What on earth is the 7+? confused

doceodocere Sat 19-Dec-15 14:16:04

It has been forbidden in schools I have worked in because it's seen as a conflict of interests.

I've also got no idea how a full time class teacher would fit it in.

meditrina Sat 19-Dec-15 14:18:32

7+ is an entrance exam for a private school.

irvine101 Sat 19-Dec-15 14:24:39

I don't understand why it can be seen as conflict of interest, some teachers do booster sessions for advanced or least able children sometimes?

All my experience of tutoring took place in school, and no cost was involved. I can still see that happening these days in my country.
I'm not saying that they should do it, just saying it's possible if they wanted to.

LibrariesgaveusP0wer Sat 19-Dec-15 14:58:57

I don't understand why it can be seen as conflict of interest, some teachers do booster sessions for advanced or least able children sometimes?

The argument is presumably that, if you are directly being financially recompensed to improve the performance of Freddie, there is an incentive to give Freddie just that bit more attention in class too. Thus a conflict, or appearance of conflict.

spanieleyes Sat 19-Dec-15 15:19:39

There is a difference between running booster groups in school time and being paid extra to tutor the same children outside school time. The argument is that, why bother giving children attention in class/booster groups if you can be paid extra for tutoring in the evenings, the less effective you are in the class, the more children there will be who you can be paid extra to tutor ( if you had the time!!)

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